Tag Archives: Ireland

Issue 371 – Christmas Truces in 1914

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 371     –     December 8, 2017

A true story worth sharing . . . 

Christmas Truces in 1914:

Peace in the Trenches of World War I

 by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Dec. 8, 2017

War and Peace - The Christmas Truce on Dec 25, 1914 During World War I - painting in the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS - Jan, 1915

World War I began as a dispute between Austria-Hungary and Serbia on July 28, 1914, but soon involved many countries of the world. It pitted the “Allied Forces” such as Serbia, Belgium, France, Great Britain and Ireland, Italy, Japan and Russia against the so-called “Central Powers” such as Serbia, Germany, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire. The United States did not officially join the Allied forces until 1917.  Many journalists and politicians billed this military struggle as “the war to end all wars.” By the end of World War I on November 11, 1918 , some 25 million people – soldiers and civilians – had been killed or serious injured. And when the smoke cleared, no one saw it as an antidote to future wars.

By November of 1914, all allusions about this war being a short one were gone. Along the Western Front, each side was dug-in to fortified, well-defended trenches and underground tunnels. This had become a war of attrition, depression and sometimes boredom.

1915--War--World War 2 -- digging trenches

War--WW 1 -- British solders on the Western Front opposite Germans - slighly damp trench -- 01

War--WW 1 -- Map of the Western Front in 1914

However, a striking example of human decency and goodwill took place mainly on the Western Front between some of the British troops and some of the opposing German troops just five months after the war had started in Europe. One hour these young soldiers were trying to kill their enemies in their trenches often less than a hundred yards away. Each army was hunkered down in their respective muddy trenches, cold and lonely and experiencing a mixture of fear and courage.

1915--War--World War 2 -- military-- medical -- shellshock

It was shortly just before midnight on Christmas Eve that a series of purely spontaneous and often unauthorized truces broke out along the long battle line. Most believe it was the German boys who started it when they stopped firing their rifles and machine guns and artillery. As that awkward peace lingered, those German troops began singing Christmas songs. In a few places, some even accompanied the singing with harmonicas or bugles.

Naturally, the leaders of the British troops were at first skeptical of this “truce” and viewed it as a trick to lull them into a false sense of security. But it wasn’t that at all. Soon, here and there along the Western Front, British troops began singing out their own Christmas carols with both pleasure and gusto. Their own musicians kicked in with whatever instruments they had at their disposal. And the Germans began yelling out in their own language or even in broken English, “Merry Christmas.” And the British troops in those spots along the war zone responded with their own shouts of “Merry Christmas to all.”

1914 -- World War 1 - German soldiers with an Xmas tree and singing carols

That kind of activity lasted through the early morning hours of Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 1914. Then just after dawn, amazingly, a handful of young German troops stood up with their arms outstretched to show they were not armed. After a few minutes they slowly walked toward the opposing troops and across “no-man’s land.” Just as bravely, a few of the British troops crawled out of their trenches and walked toward the Germans with their own arms outstretched in a sign of friendship. The two groups met in the middle ground, shook hands and even embraced in generous expressions of friendship. In a few minutes, many others from both sides joined the group standing exposed in the middle of the battlefield. They sang Christmas songs with the same melodies, but their different languages. And they laughed. A lot. A few even brought out leather-bound soccer balls and the two sides played “kick ball” or “kick about.”

1914 -- World War 1 - British and German soldiers sharing a Christmas tree

It was during these brief but enthusiastic kick ball competitions that the Germans got both an education and a chuckle or two. In one location there was a regiment of British troops from Scotland and they wore their traditional kilts on the battlefield. A German lieutenant, Johannes Niemann, years later recalled the scene this way:

1914--War--World War1 -- Scottish & German solders playing kick ball on Xmas Day

“Us Germans really roared when a gust of wind revealed that the Scots wore no drawers under their kilts—and hooted and whistled every time they caught an impudent glimpse of one posterior belonging to one of ‘yesterday’s enemies.’ But after an hour’s play, when our Commanding Officer heard about it, he sent an order that we must put a stop to it. A little later we drifted back to our trenches and the fraternization ended.”

Scottish soldiers in kilts in 1915 during WW 1

This entirely impromptu show of the brotherhood of man soon had them exchanging small gifts – perhaps a coin from their own respective currency, chocolate bars, military dress buttons, a pack of cigarettes, a can of peaches or plum pudding, a spare patch of their military unit or whatever they had at hand. In a few instances, prisoners were even exchanged and each side given time to bury their dead. This scene was repeated in many places along the Western war front as spontaneous gestures of goodwill, if only for a day.

Peace in the trenches, what a marvelous Christmas gift.

Of course, not all units of either Army participated in the truces. Some never even heard of them, since they were spontaneous and unauthorized beyond low-level officers right there in the field. Others among  both the German and the British sides actually opposed such unauthorized fraternization with the enemy. When reports of these truces and fraternization reached the higher commanders, stern rebukes were issued and penalties imposed for such unauthorized actions. One of those who stood opposed to such truces was the French military leader Charles de Gaulle, and another was a young German officer named . . . Adolph Hitler of the 16th Bavarian Reserve Infantry. 

Meanwhile, away from the actual battlefields there were pockets of anti-war protestors who saluted the spontaneous truces but protested for far more. When the United States began drafting young men into the military in 1917, it was labor leader Eugene V. Debs who opposed it and was sent to a Federal prison until 1920. Bertrand Russell, one of Britain’s leading intellectuals, spoke out against the war and spent six-months in a London jail for his efforts. Likewise, Rosa Luxemburg was an anti-war German leader who was imprisoned for two years for her protests.

Also, unfortunately, even on that Christmas day in 1914 killing and dying took place not far from some of those truce celebrations. Here are two examples.

In the darkness just before dawn, near the French village of Festubert—just a half-mile from some of the truce celebrations, several German soldiers hoisted lamps up above their trenches. “Those lamps looked like Chinese lanterns” some said. Then they called out to their British counterparts across the no man’s land. The men shouted out an offer for a day of mutual piece on this Christmas day. A British officer, thinking it was a ruse, ordered his men to shoot out those glowing lamps and they did. The German troops got the message, dismissed their generous overture to the British, and had their own short period of singing Christmas carols.

 

Huggins, Percy - British soldier killed on Dec 25, 1914 -- 02

Photo of  Private Percy Huggins

(1) So it was that later that day  a  23-year old private from England named Percy Huggins (1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment ) was at his assigned post.  It was business as usual on his part of the Western Front. He was stationed on the line less than a hundred  yards from a German  trench   Private Huggins peeked over the mound of dirt in front of his own trench and that is when a German sniper fired a fatal bullet through his head.

(2) The men of Huggins’ regiment were enraged by his killing on this Christmas day. Immediately, his platoon Sergeant, Tom Gregory, demanded and received permission to take his comrade’s position to give him a chance at avenging his friend’s death. Sgt. Gregory, was 36-years old and an expert marksman himself. Back home in Watford, England he had worked for the postal service. On this frigid day he lay still on the frost covered dirt and soon saw the German sniper and killed him with one shot. Instantly, he detected the movement of another sniper but before he could aim his own rifle the second sniper shot and killed him.

These two British soldiers were among  their 149 fellow soldiers who lost their lives on that Christmas day in 1914 (some who died that day had had  previously-inflicted battle wounds). And, of course, a number of German troops – like the one sniper mentioned above — were killed on that day as well.

By 1915, both sides had perfected new technologies of killing their enemies such a machine guns and tanks. One of the most frightening weapons, but not terribly efficient, was the release of poison gas, a tactic used by both the Allied Forces and the Cenral  Powers. By 1917, both sides were experiencing  sharp increases in deaths and carnage. So, not surprisingly, all sides demonized their opponents. And no more opportunities occurred for such spontaneous truces as those in 1914.

Still, those amazing displays of brotherhood and humanity between opposing troops on Christmas day in 1914 are still poignant reminders of what can happen between people of goodwill. That unique day has inspired poems like that of Carol Ann Duffy (Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom) in 2013 titled “The Christmas Truce” and songs like “Christmas in the Trenches” by John McCutcheon in 1984, as well as scores of articles like this one you’re reading and dozens of books like scholar Adam Hochschild’s volume titled To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918.

So let’s all stop for a moment, making our own truce in the middle of our busy lives. Is there a person or a group of people with whom you have had difficulties that you might take a first step of peace . . . and perhaps of reconciliation? 

The apostle Paul certainly was echoing the ministry of Jesus when he wrote in Romans 12:18, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”

Maybe you could break the ice between you and an estranged relative . . . or between you and a group of people . . . or between your congregation (or club or organization) and another by handing key people a copy of this article. And say something to the effect that you’d like to stop shooting at each other and have a truce, with a view toward lasting peace.

My hope is the examples of these warring troops who reached out to each other on Christmas day in 1914 will motivate us to establish our own spontaneous truces where the influence of the Prince of Peace is desperately needed.

Sources:

Bajekal, Naina. “Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914.” Published online by Time magazine at: http://time.com/3643889/christmas-truce-1914/. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017.

Brown, Malcolm and Shirley Seaton. The Christmas Truce: The Western Front December 1914. London: Papermac, 1994.

“Christmas is for Sharing.” This was a Christmas-time ad (video) which was produced in 2014 as a TV commercial by the Sainsbury’s chain of grocery stores in the eastern United State. You may view it on YouTube at:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KHoVBK2EVE

“Christmas Truce.” Wikipedia, accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_truce)

“Christmas truce of 1914 was broken when German snipers killed two British soldiers.”

Posted to the web site of the London Telegraph newspaper on Dec. 22, 2014 near the 100th anniversary of this event. Accessed Dec. 2, 2017 at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11307513/Christmas-truce-of-1914-was-broken-when-German-snipers-killed-two-British-soldiers.html ]

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park (eds.). The Christmas Truce 1914: Operation Plum Puddings, accessed December 22, 2011.  

Dash, Mike. “The Story of the WWI Christmas Truce.” An article for the Smithsonian Museum Magazine which was published on their web site on Dec. 23, 2011. Accessed on Dec. 2, 2017 at:  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-story-of-the-wwi-christmas-truce-11972213/   

Ferro, Marc and‎ Malcolm Brown and‎ Rémy Cazals and Olaf Mueller. Meetings in No Man’s Land: Christmas 1914 and Fraternization in the Great War. London: Constable & Robinson, 2007.

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park.  Not a Shot was Fired: Letters from the Christmas Truce 1914.  Alan Cleaver, Publisher. 2nd Edition in full color, 2008.

“Christmas Truce of 1914,” a video.  History.com   Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 online at: http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/christmas-truce-of-1914

Hochschild, Adam. To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918. New York: Mariner Books by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011.

Kuper, Simon. “Soccer in the trenches: Remembering the WWI Christmas Truce.”  Published on the ESPN sports web site on Dec. 25, 2015. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 at: http://www.espn.com/soccer/blog/espn-fc-united/68/post/2191045/christmas-truce-soccer-matches-during-world-war-one.

Rees, Simon. “The Christmas Truce.” Published online on Aug. 22, 2009 at http://firstworldwar.com/features/christmastruce.htm . Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017. “First World War.com” bills itself as “a multimedia history of World War One.”

Snow, Dan.  “What really happened in the Christmas truce of 1914?”  A presentation on the British Broadcasting Company’s TV channel. Accessed Dec. 1, 2017 online at

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zxsfyrd.

“The Christmas Truce.” A song written by John McKutcheon in 1984 about the truces in the trenches of World War I along the Western Front in Europe. See and hear him perform his song on YouTube at: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=chords+for+the+song%2c+%22Christmas+in+the+Trenches%22&&view=detail&mid=2E284897E6744A13B6DE2E284897E6744A13B6DE&&FORM=VDRVRV

Twitter, Jon Wiener. “The Day the Troops Refused to Fight: December 25, 1914.”  Published in the online version of The Nation magazine on Dec. 23, 2014 to mark the 100th anniversary of this remarkable day. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017 at:

https://www.thenation.com/article/day-troops-refused-fight-december-25-1914/ ]

Weintraub, Stanley. “Demystifying the Christmas truce.” The Heritage of the Great War.  __________.  Silent Night: The Remarkable Christmas Truce Of 1914. London: Simon & Schuster, 2001.

“World War I.” Wikipedia. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I.

 

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Some Thoughts on Cats and Dogs,

Candles, and Romans 14

 By Curtis K. Shelburne

Copyrighted Dec. 4, 2017

Getting ready. That’s what Advent is about.

At church we lit the first candle of Advent this morning, and, as I write on this Sunday evening, I’m sitting in a quiet house, enfolded by the warm glow of the light from our Christmas tree.

I didn’t grow up observing Advent or, for that matter, any of the other seasons of the “Christian calendar.” I was unaware that there was such a thing, and in our non- or anti-denomination denomination, there most certainly was not. I was blessed by “our” folks and still love them, but our bunch back then wasn’t even very sure about celebrating Christmas as a “religious” holiday. We weren’t the only ones. Chalk that, and a lot of this, up to our common Puritan ancestors, I think, who tended to be suspicious of both color and celebration.  But, honestly, I need to read more history to be sure I’m being fair with them.

As I grew older, I suppose I became vaguely aware that Lent was a time preceding Easter and, I thought, seemed to have something maybe to do with eating fish on Fridays. What else? I didn’t know.

As is the case with all of us pretty much all of the time, I needed very badly to learn a little more history to be able to make more sense out of the present and plot a wise course for the future. And, as a Christian, I desperately needed to read more church history for the very same reasons.

I also needed to learn some things other members of Christ’s family could teach me if we’d just try to cross over our walls occasionally and visit a bit. Not only do we honor our Lord by doing so (he prayed poignantly for the unity of God’s people, you know, in John 17), we also put ourselves in a position to learn some things. We might or might not choose to make some changes in our own situations, but at least we might come to understand more about the decisions and practices of other folks who love and honor their Lord every bit as much as our own little group does. The guy who said that cats and dogs who try spending more time with each other often find it to be a very broadening experience was on to something.

Differences among Christians regarding the keeping—or not—of special days is nothing new. When the Holy Spirit made it clear that God wanted the doors of his church opened wide to both Jews and Gentiles (the gulf between them was vastly wider than that between, say, a Baptist and a Lutheran) well, you never saw cats and dogs have a harder time figuring out how to live under one roof.

Ironically, then it was the more conservative folks who felt duty-bound to observe special feast days, and folks on the other end of the spectrum who felt perfectly free not to. Read the amazing Romans 14 to see God’s incredible counsel to his kids about dealing with differences. Don’t stand in judgment on each other, he says. Make a decision that you believe honors Christ. In love, let your brothers and sisters do the same. And don’t you kids dare look down on each other or try to make laws for one another! You’ve got one Master. You’re not him.

By the way, it turns out that Lent has precious little to do with fish. Advent does have something to do with candles (and I like candles). But both have a lot to do with preparing our hearts to more fully receive what God is doing. Personally, I like that a lot. Personally, I need that a lot.

[Copyright 2017 by Curtis K. Shelburne of Muleshoe, TX. Permission to copy without altering text or for monetary gain is hereby granted subject to inclusion of this copyright notice. You’re invited to visit his website at http://www.CurtisShelburne.com ]

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Issue 365 – Jacob Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 365  –  October 12, 2017

 

Jacob Mac Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

Paregien, Jacob M - no exiting photo -- maybe looking something like this in about 1866

 

 How Jacob might have looked at about age 50.

Introduction

I compiled the first Paregien Family History and published it in February of 1974. There were only a few people who were really involved besides me. That small number included my mom, Evelyn Paregien, my sister, Roberta Fournier, and Melvin Pearigen, Jewel Paregien Smith and Eura Paregien. That was about it. And those last three have been gone a long time now.

Thankfully, there were others who stepped up this time and gave me a hand. I especially want to thank Marie Paregien Walker, Roberta Paregien Fournier, Jan Harris Warner, Sandra Paregien Dudley, Marie Clark Palm, Amanda Pearigen, Kathy Peargin, Shirley Paregien Barrett and Clayton Moorman.

Are there typographical errors in this history? Are there factual errors in it? Do some families have much more material than others? Could it have been organized differently? Could it have been printed as a hardbound book rather than sold in the CD format?

Well, the answer to all those questions is “Yes”. And not just “Yes,” but “Heck, yes!”

The organization, final typing and editing has been a one-person project of monumental proportion. And I accept the blame for any errors or typos.

As to the format, I would welcome anyone who has deep pockets and wants to step up and put up the money to have it published as a standard book. But not many of us could afford something that would cost well over $150 each copy. So I chose to do it this way. Each person can print out the entire CD and put it in two or three three-ring binders, thus having a nice and quite functional copy. Or one may take it to a print shop and have them print it out and give it a professional binding and, . . . shazam! . . . , have a real book. Or some may choose to just print out the section dealing with their particular branch of the family. There is great flexibility, so it is your choice.

As to some families having much more material in the book than others, the fact is that some families simply donated more information and more photos than others did. Some lines did not provide any information or photos at all. None. Nada. Zip. So the minimum information that is contained here was all I could find. My goal all along was to be as inclusive as possible.  And it is.

Deciding how to organize this history was a much more difficult task than you might first think. After much consideration, it seemed to me that the best way to organize this book would be to first present the history of our patriarch, Jacob Mac Paregien, and his  thirteen (yes, 13) biological children and three stepchildren in the first section, called “Our Roots”. The remaining individuals and/or families then will follow in alphabetical order by their legal names at birth. So that is what I have done.

You will see markers such as [2001-027] in the captions next to most of the photographs and illustrations. That is simply my personal method of indexing my large collection of photographs and graphics. When the date in the caption does not match the date of the marker, the date in the caption is most reliable.

It may be helpful for you to start this history by studying the Overview, at the end of this section. That will help you to see how the different “pieces” or families fit together.  

Folks, this is about it for me. I have put much of my life into collecting information and photos of the Paregien family. It has been a rewarding and satisfying experience, but it has consumed about enough of my time and energy. There are other things in life that I still want to do.

So with this book I am passing the torch to whoever has the interest and the dedication and the love of history to take up the challenge. I’ll be glad to help those who have questions, but what you see in print here is virtually everything that I know about the family. And when I don’t work with the information regularly, it sure fades fast.

Finally, I want to dedicate this book to three very important and special women in my life: my wife and best friend, Peggy Allen Paregien;  my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling; and my sister, Roberta Paregien Fournier.

Happy reading,

Stan Paregien

March 1, 2006

Part 1:    1816  to  1857

It is thought that Jacob Mac Paregien was born on April 12, 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. We do not know the names of his parents. Jacob stated in a U.S. Federal Census for 1880 that his father was from Ireland and his mother from South Carolina.      [With the publication of this history in 2006, I am passing the genealogical torch to the next generation. Perhaps they can trace our roots back to our European origin. –SP]

The 1860 U.S. Census of Jackson County, Ill., listed Jacob “Paragen” (age 44) and married as having been born in Kentucky. But the family tradition, at least for the Frank Paregien branch and the Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine branch,  is that Jacob was born in Northern Ireland and came to the U.S. as a stowaway at the age of 14 (about 1830).

The Family Search Ancestral File (ID # 10511984) says that “Jacob M. Paregin” was born in 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. Please be advised that you will find the name Paregien spelled 50 different ways, due to the particular writer’s indifference or literacy.

The major town, today, in Warren County is Bowling Green (the county seat). Ironically, in 1962-63 Stan Paregien traveled to Bowling Green, Kentucky from Nashville every Sunday for about a year. He preached for a little country congregation, Mars Hill Church of Christ, outside of Bowling Green. He had no idea, back then, that he was near the birthplace of his great-great-grandfather.

Map -- Bowling Green, KY -- 2017

Warren county was formed in 1797. It is located in the Pennyrile and Western coal field regions of the state. The elevation in the county ranges from 395 to 955 feet above sea level.

Nancy Baird wrote this of  Bowling Green (Warren County), Kentucky: “In 1821 the Bank of the Commonwealth established a branch office on the square and by 1827 the town boasted a locally owned newspaper, a resident physician, a private school for boys (a school for girls opened in the Presbyterian Church in the mid 1820s), a Masonic lodge, at least one church, two tiny hotels, a number of mercantile shops and an array of other business establishments. Most structures housing a commercial venture also served as a residence for the owner. The courthouse provided meeting space for congregations without buildings and numerous rural log structures provided space for both school and church meetings. A stagecoach line connecting Bowling Green to Louisville, Nashville and Hopkinsville rumbled into town three times a week to discharge and pick up the mail and passengers. The round trip between Bowling Green and Louisville (180 miles) took three days and cost $12.

“From its inception Warren County’s residents depended on the Barren River as an avenue for commerce. In the winter when the river was high, flatboats loaded with tobacco, ham, whiskey and other farm produce began the arduous trip from a warehouse on the river’s edge to New Orleans. The flatboat journey down river and return by wagon or on foot (steamboats did not paddle up the Mississippi and Ohio until after 1814) required about six months. Goods not produced locally came by wagon from Louisville or Nashville on roads that were little better than an animal path, an erratic and expensive mode of freighting.

“After the advent of the steamboat on the Ohio River, local businessmen urged that the narrow, winding, snag-filled Green and Barren rivers be improved sufficiently for steamboats to ascend to Bowling Green. Without such river trade, warned a newspaper editor, “we can never be independent or prosperous.” Discussions and delays followed but eventually a company of young volunteers cleared the worst snags and overhanging trees. In January 1828 a tiny, single stack steamboat, the United States, arrived at Bowling Green and its cargo of a few boxes of sugar, tea, coffee and other items was unloaded and displayed on the riverbank. A local miss later recalled that she could not believe that so much could ever be consumed by the town’s residents.

“During the 1830s the state authorized improvements on the Green and Barren and eventually provided for the construction of locks and dams. On the completion of these projects, paddle wheelers could ply upriver to the Bowling Green boat landing.” (from A HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY)

1840

Jacob Paregien was living near Murphysboro in Jackson County, Ill., when the 1840 census was taken. He may have bought land in Section 31, W/SE sometime prior (Saline Land Grant). That record, taken by Dr. John Logan,, lists “Jacob Peregin” and a white female as living in “Township 7 — Ora”. There is an “Ora” township just north of the “Oraville” community on the Jackson County map.

Murphysboro, IL - Welcome sign - 2017

Welcome sign for Murphysboro, Illinois

Murphysboro, IL - map of Illinois with star on Murphysboro

Map of Illinois, with Myrphysboro at the bottom.

Map -- Murphysboro in Jackson County, IL and surrounding area

Map of the region around Jackson County, Illinois

Map -- Jackson County, IL                               Map of Jackson County, Illinois with Myrphysboro as the County Seat   

Dr. John Logan donated twenty acres of land for a new county seat in Murphrysboro, Jackson County, Ill., in August of 1843.

Jacob M. Paregien’s first marriage was to Nancy Morgan (born 9 April, 1821 or 1822  in Warren County, Kentucky). Her father was  Robert H. Morgan and he was born 19 March, 1786 in North Carolina. Robert Morgan  married Hannah Moyers Myers on  5 Feb., 1812 in Warren County, Kentucky. She had been born about 1794 in Tenn. The web site of Warren County Genealogical Society has her name spelled as “Hanniah Mires,” but the date is the same (http://www.burgoo.com/). Robert Morgan died in September, 1855 in Jackson County, Ill.

Nancy Morgan’s siblings were: Margaret Morgan (born 1826 in Kentucky), Martha Jane Morgan (born 25 Feb., 1825 in Warren County, Ken.; died 13 Sept., 1948 in Jackson County, Ill.)

Jacob and Nancy (Morgan) Paregien had nine children. We only have a photo of one of these nine children, James A. Paregien.

  1. William H. Paregien

William H. Paregien was born 23 Nov., 1837 . He was born in Missouri, according to the 1840 U.S. Census for Jackson County, Ill.  He married Huldah McCann on 11 Jan., 1859. — Jackson County Illinois Marriages: 1857-1866, p. 27).

(Also: See the information below on the 1860 Census, below, which states that at age 23 he was living with his wife, “Huldy” and daughter Elizabeth in Jackson County).

On 21 Sept., 1852, William Paregien bought 40.12 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W. Then on 30 Sept., 1852 William Paregien bought .12 acres of land for $1.25 in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

28 Jan., 1876   –   A 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

  1. James Alexander Paregien

James Alexander Paregien was born 21 March, 1841 in Murphysboro, Ill. (State of birth so noted in the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Ill.).

See more under a separate listing for James A. Paregien in Chapters 4-8.

  1. Mary Jane Paregien

Mary Jane Paregien was born 24 June, 1844. At the tender age of 14, she married James Ward on 25 Nov., 1858. (Marriages Index, Jackson County Courthouse, p. 37).

The 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows a Mary Ward, born in Illinois in 1844, married to a John Ward (blacksmith). That may or may not be our Mary Jane Paregien Ward.

It is important not to confuse this Mary Paregien, born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien, with the Mary A. Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien.

  1. Emily Elizabeth Paregien

She was born 30 Dec., 1845 in Missouri (according to the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois).The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin“, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township.

It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township.

[The 1870 Census for Lauderdale, Alabama (Township 2, Range 8) lists an Eliza Peregin, age 36, born in 1833 in Alabama. It also lists a Nancy Peregin, age 1, born in 1868 in Alabama as living in the same Township.]

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien, age 27,  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien) was married to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

There is no listing for them anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census that I can find. Both the names Richard Connell and Elizabeth Connell are very common.

  1. Sarah A. Paregien

Sarah A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien on 10 March, 1849 (??) in Missouri (according to 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois). There is no mention of her in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, anywhere.

There is no mention of a Sarah A. Paregien anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, when her father and stepmother and several siblings were living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. She would have been 31 years of age then.

  1. Robert H. Paregien

Robert H. Paregien was born 24 March, 1849 in Jackson County, Ill. He died in 1857 at about age 8. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has his name as Robert F. Paregin.

  1. Louise E. Paregien

Louise (or perhaps Louisa) E. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien  on 26 Dec., 1851. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has her first name as Louisa and says she was born in 1853 in Jackson County, Ill.

She married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869.

  1. Samuel M. Paregien

Samuel M. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien on 10 Feb., 1853. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has him born in 1855 in Jackson County, Ill. The 1910 U.S. Federal Census has him born in 1852

One source says Samuel died 4 May, 1864, but I don’t think that is correct. Can a dead man get married? Perhaps. Or, more likely, he really did not die in 1864. There was a Samuel Paregien who married Mary C. Davis (Index to Female Marriages, Jackson County Marriages, Book 2, 121).

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for his father,  “J.M. Paregien

However, the 1880 U.S. Census shows Samuel Paregien, age 26, living with his parents and other relatives in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

In 1907 there was a Samuel Paregien who owned land in Kincaid Township, IS, Range 4W of the 3rd PM, Block 24. The land is west of Kincaid Lake (The lake is man-made and was not there in those days) and is now owned by the U.S. Forest Service.

The 1910 United States Federal Census for Jackson County shows Samuel M. Paregien, age 57 (born in 1852 in Illinois), as living in Kincaid Township.

There is a  Sam Perigen  listed as buried in the Kincaid Cemetery.

  1. Thomas J. Paregien

Thomas J. Paregien was the final child born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien. He was born 20 Nov., 1854 in Jackson County, Ill. Could his full name have been Thomas Jefferson Paregien? It was common to name children after presidents or prominent people. Thomas J. Paregien died at age four, on 21 Feb., 1859, probably in Jackson County, Illinois.

___________

 

The 1830 Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows that there were only 86 white residents in the county who were over 50 years of age. The life span was not that great, back then. There were a total of 1,768 white residents and 62 black residents.

The 1840 Census Record taken by Dr. John Logan lists a “Jacob Peregin” and a white female in Jackson County, Illinois (Township 7 – Ora; sheet 11). This document was found at www.rootsweb.com/~iljackson/1840.html. There is a community north of Murphysboro named Oraville.

The 1850 U.S. Census Record shows Arys Parmley being married to Daniel, in the Jacksonville area [My sister, Robert Paregien Fournier, found this entry]

The web site for Illinois Land Purchases shows that Jacob “McParegien” bought a parcel of “Federal sale” land in a sale dated 28 April, 1853. And he bought another on 30 April, 1853.  The April 30 document says it was a Federal sale in which he bought .38 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NESW, Range 02W, for $1.25.  Jacob Paregien is also listed as “Jacob M. Paragin” (Township 7S, Range 2W,  Sec 31 WSE) and as Jacob “Peregin”.

On 26 Feb., 1855 “Jacob McParigren” was listed in a probate hearing as the executor of the will for a Mr. Samuel Perry (will on file at Southern Illinois University Library, File 1775).

It was on 3 Nov., 1855 that the probate of the will of  Daniel Parmlee was filed (File #1777), with the executor being Jesse W. Ward.  This was, no doubt, Daniel Parmley, the deceased husband of  Avis Parmley ( She then became Jacob Paregien’s second wife).

Jacob’s first wife , Nancy Morgan Paregien, died on 19 Dec., 1856 (just one year after her father died). Probably in Jackson County, Illinois.  [RESEARCH NOTE: Where is she buried?]

Overview

 Jacob M. Paregien & Nancy Morgan had 9 children (listed chronologically):

          William H. Paregien

          James A. Paregien 

          Mary Jane Paregien

          Emily Elizabeth Paregien

          Sarah A. Paregien

          Robert H. Paregien

          Louise E. Paregien

          Samuel M. Paregien

          Thomas J. Paregien

Jacob M. Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, had 4 children:

          Nancy Paregien

          Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (changed his name to PAREGINE)  

          Mary A. Paregien

          Henry Clay Paregien (changed his name to PEARIGEN)

 

James A. Paregien (son of Jacob) and Harriet Brummett had 9 children:

            Hariett E. Paregien

            James Edward “Bud” Paregien

            George Walter Paregien

            Emey Evaline Paregien

            Jefferson Mac (“Jeff”) Paregien

            William Marion (“Will”) Paregien

            Alruettir Paregien

            Nancy Paregien

            Benjamin Franklin (“Frank”) Paregien

Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob) married Anton “Ollie” Guion and had 3 children:

            May Guion

            Maud Guion

            Thomas Guion

 

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine* (son of Jacob) married Celia Lowe and they had one child:

            Edd Paregine

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine and his 2nd wife, Mollie Mary Brooks Payne, had 3 children:

            Lillian Mary Paregine

            William Mack Paregine

            Grace Olive Paregine

Henry Clay Pearigen (son of Jacob) married Sarah Evangeline Taylor and they had 5 children:

            Eldora Pearigen

            Bird McKinley Pearigen

            Melvin L. Paregien

            Girl who died in infancy

            Another child

 

James Edward “Bud” Paregien married Julie Copeland and they had 1 child:

            William Reece Paregien (he began spelling his name as PEARGIN). He

                     married Lulu Lawson and they had 5 children:

            Marvin Peargin

            Douglas Peargin

            Orie Peargin

            William Olan Peargin

            Creda Peargin

            Richard Odell Peargin

James Edward Paregien and his 2nd wife had 1 and possibly 2 children:

            Bertha Paregien

            Warner (or maybe William) Paregien (??)

 Part 1 of 3 

 

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Issue 332 – Stan Paregien’s 15 eBooks Online

The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 332  –  May 4, 2016  –  Stan Paregien Sr., Editor

Periodically I need to stop and introduce my newer internet friends to some of the other things I have written over the years. So what follows here are thumbnail descriptions of the fifteen (15) eBooks of mine which are currently for sale online in a variety of popular formats.

I hope to have another eBook finished by the end of the summer, this one a non-fiction book with loads of photos and information about places and people in our recently adopted state, Florida. When that one is complete, I plan to start the most challenging non-fiction book of my entire career. Can’t tell you much about it, except that it will probably take a year or two for me to complete it. And I hope it will be my best and most-widely received.

After those two very serious projects end, I’ll ease off the keyboard and chip away at my “bucket list” of over 15 more writing projects. Do you know the story of Mrs. Winchester of the famed, odd-ball “Winchester House” in San Jose, California? Well, her hubby invented the Winchester brand rifle. He made a king-sized fortune on the manufacture of his guns and ammunition. After his death, Mrs. Winchester began listening way too much to a gypsy fortuneteller who convinced her that she would not die as long as there were carpenters at work on her house. So this dear lady with deep pockets kept crews of carpenters busy 24-hours of every day for years. So her house had doors and stairways that led nowhere and rooms that had been remodeled dozens of times. But, bless this mislead lady, her heart stopped way before the hammers and saws would have.

Unlike Mrs. Winchester, I really am not working away at my eBooks under some similar delusion that as long as I’m working on a manuscript I will not die. I’m a realist in the awareness that I may not even finish this page, let alone another manuscript, before the Good Lord calls me  to that Writers Retirement Home in the Sky. God knows I’m ready when He is, but I just don’t want to get on the Gospel Train today if it can be helped. So I keep writing.

In the meantime, please read through this information about what I have already done.

 

2016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 01 of 13

2016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 02 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 03 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 04 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 05 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 06 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 07 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 08 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 09 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 10 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 11 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 12 of 132016--05--03   Stan Paregien's Online eBooks  --- list of 15 -- page 13 of 13

There you have it, friends. My blog for today. I really do appreciate you stopping by once in a while to catch up on what is going on in my corner of the world. I am absolutely amazed at the fact we get visits from people in so many countries around the world. Even a few that I’m gonna have to look on a map and find out where they’re located.

From January 1 to May4, 2016, we had visitors from an amazing 64 countries in the world. Here is the list in order of frequency, with the visitors from the United States being 20 times as many as the next country:

(1) United States, (2) France, (3) German, (4) United Kingdom, (5) Columbia, (6) Brazil, (7) Spain, (8) Netherlands, (9) India, (10) South Africa, (11) Hungary, (12) (13) Australia, (14) Jamaica, (15) Norway, (16) Italy, (17) Ghana, (18) Switzerland, (19) Finland, and (20) Sweden.

Also:  Ireland, Poland, European Union, Thailand, Philippines, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Chech Republic, Venezuala, New Zealand, Austria, Portugal, Trinidad & Tobago, Belgium, Israel, Chile, Mexico, Twaiwon, Serbia, Argentina, Puerto Rico, Slovenia, Jordan, Ukraine, Russia, Costa Rica, United Arab Emirates, Iceland, Lebanon, Peru, Mayotte, Turkey, Kuwait, Greece, Sri Lanka, Georgia (Russia), Morocco, British Virgin Islands, Ecuador, Romania, and Vatican City.

What? Vatican City. Yep, Vatican City. Hmmm. Wonder if one of them was the Pope?

That wide and semi-permanent exposure of my thoughts to others in other cultures is another reason I keep on writing. 

See ya next time.  

 — Stan                Stan Paregien, Storyteller -- 01--D   300 dpi

P.S. The above logo was designed for me by my late sister, Roberta Paregien Fournier, who died in 2015. I miss my littl’ sister a whole bunch almost every day.

Bar  -- 03   Blue with tan and maroon border - created by Stan Paregien - 2015-11-10