Category Archives: Sports

Issue 371 – Christmas Truces in 1914

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 371     –     December 8, 2017

A true story worth sharing . . . 

Christmas Truces in 1914:

Peace in the Trenches of World War I

 by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Dec. 8, 2017

War and Peace - The Christmas Truce on Dec 25, 1914 During World War I - painting in the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS - Jan, 1915

World War I began as a dispute between Austria-Hungary and Serbia on July 28, 1914, but soon involved many countries of the world. It pitted the “Allied Forces” such as Serbia, Belgium, France, Great Britain and Ireland, Italy, Japan and Russia against the so-called “Central Powers” such as Serbia, Germany, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire. The United States did not officially join the Allied forces until 1917.  Many journalists and politicians billed this military struggle as “the war to end all wars.” By the end of World War I on November 11, 1918 , some 25 million people – soldiers and civilians – had been killed or serious injured. And when the smoke cleared, no one saw it as an antidote to future wars.

By November of 1914, all allusions about this war being a short one were gone. Along the Western Front, each side was dug-in to fortified, well-defended trenches and underground tunnels. This had become a war of attrition, depression and sometimes boredom.

1915--War--World War 2 -- digging trenches

War--WW 1 -- British solders on the Western Front opposite Germans - slighly damp trench -- 01

War--WW 1 -- Map of the Western Front in 1914

However, a striking example of human decency and goodwill took place mainly on the Western Front between some of the British troops and some of the opposing German troops just five months after the war had started in Europe. One hour these young soldiers were trying to kill their enemies in their trenches often less than a hundred yards away. Each army was hunkered down in their respective muddy trenches, cold and lonely and experiencing a mixture of fear and courage.

1915--War--World War 2 -- military-- medical -- shellshock

It was shortly just before midnight on Christmas Eve that a series of purely spontaneous and often unauthorized truces broke out along the long battle line. Most believe it was the German boys who started it when they stopped firing their rifles and machine guns and artillery. As that awkward peace lingered, those German troops began singing Christmas songs. In a few places, some even accompanied the singing with harmonicas or bugles.

Naturally, the leaders of the British troops were at first skeptical of this “truce” and viewed it as a trick to lull them into a false sense of security. But it wasn’t that at all. Soon, here and there along the Western Front, British troops began singing out their own Christmas carols with both pleasure and gusto. Their own musicians kicked in with whatever instruments they had at their disposal. And the Germans began yelling out in their own language or even in broken English, “Merry Christmas.” And the British troops in those spots along the war zone responded with their own shouts of “Merry Christmas to all.”

1914 -- World War 1 - German soldiers with an Xmas tree and singing carols

That kind of activity lasted through the early morning hours of Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 1914. Then just after dawn, amazingly, a handful of young German troops stood up with their arms outstretched to show they were not armed. After a few minutes they slowly walked toward the opposing troops and across “no-man’s land.” Just as bravely, a few of the British troops crawled out of their trenches and walked toward the Germans with their own arms outstretched in a sign of friendship. The two groups met in the middle ground, shook hands and even embraced in generous expressions of friendship. In a few minutes, many others from both sides joined the group standing exposed in the middle of the battlefield. They sang Christmas songs with the same melodies, but their different languages. And they laughed. A lot. A few even brought out leather-bound soccer balls and the two sides played “kick ball” or “kick about.”

1914 -- World War 1 - British and German soldiers sharing a Christmas tree

It was during these brief but enthusiastic kick ball competitions that the Germans got both an education and a chuckle or two. In one location there was a regiment of British troops from Scotland and they wore their traditional kilts on the battlefield. A German lieutenant, Johannes Niemann, years later recalled the scene this way:

1914--War--World War1 -- Scottish & German solders playing kick ball on Xmas Day

“Us Germans really roared when a gust of wind revealed that the Scots wore no drawers under their kilts—and hooted and whistled every time they caught an impudent glimpse of one posterior belonging to one of ‘yesterday’s enemies.’ But after an hour’s play, when our Commanding Officer heard about it, he sent an order that we must put a stop to it. A little later we drifted back to our trenches and the fraternization ended.”

Scottish soldiers in kilts in 1915 during WW 1

This entirely impromptu show of the brotherhood of man soon had them exchanging small gifts – perhaps a coin from their own respective currency, chocolate bars, military dress buttons, a pack of cigarettes, a can of peaches or plum pudding, a spare patch of their military unit or whatever they had at hand. In a few instances, prisoners were even exchanged and each side given time to bury their dead. This scene was repeated in many places along the Western war front as spontaneous gestures of goodwill, if only for a day.

Peace in the trenches, what a marvelous Christmas gift.

Of course, not all units of either Army participated in the truces. Some never even heard of them, since they were spontaneous and unauthorized beyond low-level officers right there in the field. Others among  both the German and the British sides actually opposed such unauthorized fraternization with the enemy. When reports of these truces and fraternization reached the higher commanders, stern rebukes were issued and penalties imposed for such unauthorized actions. One of those who stood opposed to such truces was the French military leader Charles de Gaulle, and another was a young German officer named . . . Adolph Hitler of the 16th Bavarian Reserve Infantry. 

Meanwhile, away from the actual battlefields there were pockets of anti-war protestors who saluted the spontaneous truces but protested for far more. When the United States began drafting young men into the military in 1917, it was labor leader Eugene V. Debs who opposed it and was sent to a Federal prison until 1920. Bertrand Russell, one of Britain’s leading intellectuals, spoke out against the war and spent six-months in a London jail for his efforts. Likewise, Rosa Luxemburg was an anti-war German leader who was imprisoned for two years for her protests.

Also, unfortunately, even on that Christmas day in 1914 killing and dying took place not far from some of those truce celebrations. Here are two examples.

In the darkness just before dawn, near the French village of Festubert—just a half-mile from some of the truce celebrations, several German soldiers hoisted lamps up above their trenches. “Those lamps looked like Chinese lanterns” some said. Then they called out to their British counterparts across the no man’s land. The men shouted out an offer for a day of mutual piece on this Christmas day. A British officer, thinking it was a ruse, ordered his men to shoot out those glowing lamps and they did. The German troops got the message, dismissed their generous overture to the British, and had their own short period of singing Christmas carols.

 

Huggins, Percy - British soldier killed on Dec 25, 1914 -- 02

Photo of  Private Percy Huggins

(1) So it was that later that day  a  23-year old private from England named Percy Huggins (1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment ) was at his assigned post.  It was business as usual on his part of the Western Front. He was stationed on the line less than a hundred  yards from a German  trench   Private Huggins peeked over the mound of dirt in front of his own trench and that is when a German sniper fired a fatal bullet through his head.

(2) The men of Huggins’ regiment were enraged by his killing on this Christmas day. Immediately, his platoon Sergeant, Tom Gregory, demanded and received permission to take his comrade’s position to give him a chance at avenging his friend’s death. Sgt. Gregory, was 36-years old and an expert marksman himself. Back home in Watford, England he had worked for the postal service. On this frigid day he lay still on the frost covered dirt and soon saw the German sniper and killed him with one shot. Instantly, he detected the movement of another sniper but before he could aim his own rifle the second sniper shot and killed him.

These two British soldiers were among  their 149 fellow soldiers who lost their lives on that Christmas day in 1914 (some who died that day had had  previously-inflicted battle wounds). And, of course, a number of German troops – like the one sniper mentioned above — were killed on that day as well.

By 1915, both sides had perfected new technologies of killing their enemies such a machine guns and tanks. One of the most frightening weapons, but not terribly efficient, was the release of poison gas, a tactic used by both the Allied Forces and the Cenral  Powers. By 1917, both sides were experiencing  sharp increases in deaths and carnage. So, not surprisingly, all sides demonized their opponents. And no more opportunities occurred for such spontaneous truces as those in 1914.

Still, those amazing displays of brotherhood and humanity between opposing troops on Christmas day in 1914 are still poignant reminders of what can happen between people of goodwill. That unique day has inspired poems like that of Carol Ann Duffy (Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom) in 2013 titled “The Christmas Truce” and songs like “Christmas in the Trenches” by John McCutcheon in 1984, as well as scores of articles like this one you’re reading and dozens of books like scholar Adam Hochschild’s volume titled To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918.

So let’s all stop for a moment, making our own truce in the middle of our busy lives. Is there a person or a group of people with whom you have had difficulties that you might take a first step of peace . . . and perhaps of reconciliation? 

The apostle Paul certainly was echoing the ministry of Jesus when he wrote in Romans 12:18, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”

Maybe you could break the ice between you and an estranged relative . . . or between you and a group of people . . . or between your congregation (or club or organization) and another by handing key people a copy of this article. And say something to the effect that you’d like to stop shooting at each other and have a truce, with a view toward lasting peace.

My hope is the examples of these warring troops who reached out to each other on Christmas day in 1914 will motivate us to establish our own spontaneous truces where the influence of the Prince of Peace is desperately needed.

Sources:

Bajekal, Naina. “Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914.” Published online by Time magazine at: http://time.com/3643889/christmas-truce-1914/. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017.

Brown, Malcolm and Shirley Seaton. The Christmas Truce: The Western Front December 1914. London: Papermac, 1994.

“Christmas is for Sharing.” This was a Christmas-time ad (video) which was produced in 2014 as a TV commercial by the Sainsbury’s chain of grocery stores in the eastern United State. You may view it on YouTube at:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KHoVBK2EVE

“Christmas Truce.” Wikipedia, accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_truce)

“Christmas truce of 1914 was broken when German snipers killed two British soldiers.”

Posted to the web site of the London Telegraph newspaper on Dec. 22, 2014 near the 100th anniversary of this event. Accessed Dec. 2, 2017 at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11307513/Christmas-truce-of-1914-was-broken-when-German-snipers-killed-two-British-soldiers.html ]

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park (eds.). The Christmas Truce 1914: Operation Plum Puddings, accessed December 22, 2011.  

Dash, Mike. “The Story of the WWI Christmas Truce.” An article for the Smithsonian Museum Magazine which was published on their web site on Dec. 23, 2011. Accessed on Dec. 2, 2017 at:  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-story-of-the-wwi-christmas-truce-11972213/   

Ferro, Marc and‎ Malcolm Brown and‎ Rémy Cazals and Olaf Mueller. Meetings in No Man’s Land: Christmas 1914 and Fraternization in the Great War. London: Constable & Robinson, 2007.

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park.  Not a Shot was Fired: Letters from the Christmas Truce 1914.  Alan Cleaver, Publisher. 2nd Edition in full color, 2008.

“Christmas Truce of 1914,” a video.  History.com   Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 online at: http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/christmas-truce-of-1914

Hochschild, Adam. To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918. New York: Mariner Books by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011.

Kuper, Simon. “Soccer in the trenches: Remembering the WWI Christmas Truce.”  Published on the ESPN sports web site on Dec. 25, 2015. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 at: http://www.espn.com/soccer/blog/espn-fc-united/68/post/2191045/christmas-truce-soccer-matches-during-world-war-one.

Rees, Simon. “The Christmas Truce.” Published online on Aug. 22, 2009 at http://firstworldwar.com/features/christmastruce.htm . Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017. “First World War.com” bills itself as “a multimedia history of World War One.”

Snow, Dan.  “What really happened in the Christmas truce of 1914?”  A presentation on the British Broadcasting Company’s TV channel. Accessed Dec. 1, 2017 online at

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zxsfyrd.

“The Christmas Truce.” A song written by John McKutcheon in 1984 about the truces in the trenches of World War I along the Western Front in Europe. See and hear him perform his song on YouTube at: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=chords+for+the+song%2c+%22Christmas+in+the+Trenches%22&&view=detail&mid=2E284897E6744A13B6DE2E284897E6744A13B6DE&&FORM=VDRVRV

Twitter, Jon Wiener. “The Day the Troops Refused to Fight: December 25, 1914.”  Published in the online version of The Nation magazine on Dec. 23, 2014 to mark the 100th anniversary of this remarkable day. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017 at:

https://www.thenation.com/article/day-troops-refused-fight-december-25-1914/ ]

Weintraub, Stanley. “Demystifying the Christmas truce.” The Heritage of the Great War.  __________.  Silent Night: The Remarkable Christmas Truce Of 1914. London: Simon & Schuster, 2001.

“World War I.” Wikipedia. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I.

 

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Some Thoughts on Cats and Dogs,

Candles, and Romans 14

 By Curtis K. Shelburne

Copyrighted Dec. 4, 2017

Getting ready. That’s what Advent is about.

At church we lit the first candle of Advent this morning, and, as I write on this Sunday evening, I’m sitting in a quiet house, enfolded by the warm glow of the light from our Christmas tree.

I didn’t grow up observing Advent or, for that matter, any of the other seasons of the “Christian calendar.” I was unaware that there was such a thing, and in our non- or anti-denomination denomination, there most certainly was not. I was blessed by “our” folks and still love them, but our bunch back then wasn’t even very sure about celebrating Christmas as a “religious” holiday. We weren’t the only ones. Chalk that, and a lot of this, up to our common Puritan ancestors, I think, who tended to be suspicious of both color and celebration.  But, honestly, I need to read more history to be sure I’m being fair with them.

As I grew older, I suppose I became vaguely aware that Lent was a time preceding Easter and, I thought, seemed to have something maybe to do with eating fish on Fridays. What else? I didn’t know.

As is the case with all of us pretty much all of the time, I needed very badly to learn a little more history to be able to make more sense out of the present and plot a wise course for the future. And, as a Christian, I desperately needed to read more church history for the very same reasons.

I also needed to learn some things other members of Christ’s family could teach me if we’d just try to cross over our walls occasionally and visit a bit. Not only do we honor our Lord by doing so (he prayed poignantly for the unity of God’s people, you know, in John 17), we also put ourselves in a position to learn some things. We might or might not choose to make some changes in our own situations, but at least we might come to understand more about the decisions and practices of other folks who love and honor their Lord every bit as much as our own little group does. The guy who said that cats and dogs who try spending more time with each other often find it to be a very broadening experience was on to something.

Differences among Christians regarding the keeping—or not—of special days is nothing new. When the Holy Spirit made it clear that God wanted the doors of his church opened wide to both Jews and Gentiles (the gulf between them was vastly wider than that between, say, a Baptist and a Lutheran) well, you never saw cats and dogs have a harder time figuring out how to live under one roof.

Ironically, then it was the more conservative folks who felt duty-bound to observe special feast days, and folks on the other end of the spectrum who felt perfectly free not to. Read the amazing Romans 14 to see God’s incredible counsel to his kids about dealing with differences. Don’t stand in judgment on each other, he says. Make a decision that you believe honors Christ. In love, let your brothers and sisters do the same. And don’t you kids dare look down on each other or try to make laws for one another! You’ve got one Master. You’re not him.

By the way, it turns out that Lent has precious little to do with fish. Advent does have something to do with candles (and I like candles). But both have a lot to do with preparing our hearts to more fully receive what God is doing. Personally, I like that a lot. Personally, I need that a lot.

[Copyright 2017 by Curtis K. Shelburne of Muleshoe, TX. Permission to copy without altering text or for monetary gain is hereby granted subject to inclusion of this copyright notice. You’re invited to visit his website at http://www.CurtisShelburne.com ]

AA Fair Use Disclaimer - 02 -- for entire newsletter or blog

 

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Issue 322 – Football, American Style

The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 322  –  February 5, 2016

Stan Paregien, Editor

Football, American Style

 

Football  --  Cartoon  --  06

Football  --  Cartoon  --  14

 

Football  --  Cartoon  --  11

What It Was, Was Football

by Andy Griffith

[ Andy Griffith, a 1949 graduate of the University of North Carolina, became a struggling entertainer, actor and musician. Late in 1949 he sat down and wrote a folksy story about a church deacon’s very first time to attend a football game. He called his humorous story, “What It Was, Was Football.” He performed his story in coffee shops, churches and private parties and always got a great response from his audiences. Finally, Colonial Records in Chapel Hill, NC recorded the story and released it on November 14, 1953. It became very popular and they sold it to Capitol Records. It remained popular for decades, finally selling over  a million copies. The first time I heard the story was when I visited my cousin, Bruce Young, in Duncan, Oklahoma in the summer of 1954. He played his 45 rpm record of Griffith’s football story and I laughed myself silly. And so did my cousin, even though he had played that record for others dozens of times. Heck, it is still funny there some 62 years later. – Stan Paregien Sr.]

Griffith, Andy -- What It Was, Was Football -- 1953

It was back last October, I believe it was. We was agonna hold a tent service off at this college town. And we got thar about dinnertime on Saturday. And different ones of us thought that we ought to get us a mouthful to eat before that we set up the tent. And so we got offa the truck and followed this little bunch of people through this small little bitty patch of woods thar, and we come up on a big sign it says, “Get somethin’ t’ Eat chyere!” I went up and got me two hot dogs and a big orange drink. 

But before that I could take a-ry mouthful . . . this whole raft of people come up around me and got me to where I couldn’t eat nothing. And I dropped my big orange drink. I did.

Well, friends, they commenced to move, and there wasn’t so much that I could do but move with ’em. We commenced to go through all kinds of doors and gates and I don’t know what- all. And I looked up over one of ’em and it says, “North Gate.”

We kept on a-going through thar, and pretty soon we come up on a young boy and he says, “Ticket, please.” And I says, “Friend, I don’t have a ticket;

I don’t even know where it is that I’m a-going!” I did. Well, he says, “Come on out as quick as you can.” And I says, “I’ll do ‘er; I’ll turn right around the first chanct I get.”

Well, we kept on a-moving through there, and pretty soon everybody got where it was that they was a-going, because they parted and I could see pretty good. I could. And what I seen was this whole raft of people a-sittin’ on these two banks and a-lookin at one another across this pretty little green cow pasture.

Well, they was.

And somebody had took and drawed white lines all over it and drove postys in it, and I don’t know what all. And I looked down there and I seen five or six convicts a running up and down and a-blowing whistles. They was!

And then I looked down there and I seen these pretty girls a-wearin’ these little bitty short dresses and a-dancing around. So I sit down and thought I’d see what it was that was a-gonna to happen. I did.

About the time I got set down good I looked down there and I seen thirty or forty men come runnin’ out of one end of a great big outhouse down there. They did!

And everybody where I was a-settin’ got up and hollered!

And about that time thirty or forty come runnin’ out of the other end of that outhouse, and the other bankful, they got up and hollered. And I asked this fella that was a besittin’ beside of me, “Friend, what is it that they’re a-hollerin’ for?”

Well, he whopped me on the back and he says, “Buddy, have a drink!” Well, I says, “Well, I believe I will have another big orange.” And I got it and set back down.

When I got down there, again, I seen that the men had got in two little bitty bunches down there real close together. And they voted. They did. They voted.

They elected one man apiece, and them two men come out in the middle of that cow pasture and shook hands like they hadn’t seen one another in a long time.

Then a convict come over to where they was a-standin’, and he took out a quarter and they commenced to odd-man right there! They did! Well, After a while I seen what it was they was odd-manning for. It was that both bunches full of them wanted this funny lookin little pumpkin to play with. They did. And I know, friends, that they couldn’t eat it because they kicked it the whole evenin’ and it never busted.

Uh, anyhow, what I was a-tellin’ was that both bunches wanted that thing. One bunch got it and it made the other bunch just as mad as they could be! And Friends, I seen that evenin’ the awfulest fight that I ever have seen in all my life!

They would run at one -another and kick one- another and throw one another down and stomp on one another. And grind their feet in one another and I don’t know what-all. And just as fast as one of ’em would get hurt, they’d tote him off and run another one on.

Well, they done that as long as I sat there, but pretty soon this boy that had said “Ticket, please,” he come up to me and says, “Friend, you’re gonna have to leave because it is that you don’t have a ticket.” And I says, “Well, all right.” And I got up and left.

And I don’t know friends, to this day, what it was that they was a doin’ down there. But I have studied about it. I think it was that it’s some kindly of a contest where they see which bunchful of them men can take that pumpkin and run from one end of that cow pasture to the other without either gettin’ knocked down or steppin’ in somethin’.

___________

Football  --  Cartoon  --  09

'Good news. We've decided to give you the game ball.'

Football Philosophy

 by Stan Paregien Sr.

Copyright 1990

 

Our old high school football coach was a

strange kind of guy,

One who was mentally pumped up

and always flying high.

 

He always told the fans,

“This will be the year

That we vanquish our rivals

 and fill them with fear.”

 

Our coach turned into a madman

when the starting whistle blew.

“Get out there, boys, and

kill a   mother’s son or two!

 

“Mangle their bodies like your

momma’s mash sauerkraut

Gouge ’em hard, bite ’em

and bash their brains out!”

 

“Make dead meat of that low-life,

rotten scum-bag team.

“Don’t let ’em up off the ground

until they start to scream.”

 

“And above all,” the coach said,

when the principal came around,

“Remember, gentleman, it’s just a game.

“So let sportsmanship abound.”

__________

Now, . . . my personal choice of some of the

best coaches ever.

 

 

Camp, Walter -- Yale U coach credit with created modern football

Walter Camp, a coach at Yale University, is considered the father of modern football.

Football  --  coaches  --  Rockne, Knute -- Notre Dame --  04

Football  --  coaches  --  Bryant, Paul 'Bear'  --  01

Football  --  coaches  --  Bryant, Paul 'Bear'  --  02

Football  --  coaches  --  Bryant, Paul 'Bear'  --  03Football  --  coaches  --  Bryant, Paul 'Bear'  --  04

Football  --  coaches  --  Landry, Tom  --  01

Football  --  Coaches  --  Landry, Tom  --  03

Football  --  coaches  --  Landry, Tom with Bum Phillips  --  01

Bum Phillips stands on the sideline
1984: Head coach Bum Phillips of the New Orleans Saints stands on the sideline during a 1984 NFL game against the Los Angeles Rams.

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  02

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  03  --  with son, Wade

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  01

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  06  --  Bumisms

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  07

 

Football  --  coaches  --  Phillips, Bum  --  05  --  tribute

 

Football  --  coaches  --  Wilkinson, Bud  --  01

Coach Wilkinson led the University of Oklahoma Sooners to an amazing string of 47 straight wins. He was a man of great personal integrity as well.

Bob Stoops

Coach Bob Stoops in 2016 will begin his 18th year as the head football coach of the Sooners. He won one National Championship soon after he started and has come awfully close two or three other times, including this last season. He is a pretty doggone solid citizen.

Football  --  coaches  --  Saban, Nick  --  01

You’re never gonna hear Nick Saban say, “Hey, brother, could you loan me a dime?” He makes multi-millions each year, thank you.  In January of 2016 he won his fifth–count ’em, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5–national football championship. The astounding thing is that all those were not with Alabama, his current time. No, siree. His first national championship was in 2003 with the LSU Tigers. The man is simply a mastermind at getting the best from both his players and his assistant coaches.

Now, . . . The Football Players

Football  -- old-time football with no protective helmets

Thorp, Jim -- great athlete from Oklahoma -- 01

Jim Thorp, above, was outfitted as most players were in the 1920s and 1930s with a few lumpy pads and a simple leather helmet with no face mask at all. The rate of injuries per game was very high. Then along came plastic helmets with more protection. And then the addition of face masks, although mine in 1958 was just a rod about the size of my index finger. I personally found out that a football, thrown really hard at an end who just turned around, will jam through the helmet and the top of the facemask rod and knock off a lot of bark. Today many of the linemen look as though they’re wearing baseball catcher’s masks. 

Football  --  players  --  Unitas, Johnny  --  01  -- Baltimore Colts

Football  --  players  --  Gifford, Frank  --  01  -- All-Pro with the NY Giants

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don  --  06  --  quote

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don  --  02  --  tribute

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don  --  03  --  tribute

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don  --  04  --  quote

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don  --  05  --  quote

Football  --  players  --  Meredith, Don with Howard Cosell and Frank Gifford  --  01  --  ABC football announcers

Football  --  players  --  Staubach, Roger  --  01  -- Dallas CowboysFootball  --  players  --  Staubach, Roger  --  02  -- Dallas Cowboys

Football  --  players  --  Staubach, Roger  --  03  -- Dallas Cowboys

Football  --  players  --  Bradshaw, Terry  --  02

Football  --  players  --  Bradshaw, Terry  --  04Football  --  players  --  Bradshaw, Terry  --  06

Football  --  players  --  Bradshaw, Terry  --  05

Football  --  players  --  Campbell, Earl  --  01

Football  --  players  --  Campbell, Earl  --  02  -- quote

 

 

Football  --  players  --  Owens, Steve  --  01

Football  --  players  --  Owens, Steve  --  02 - Jason White, Sam Bradford, Billy Sims

Football  --  players  --  Owens, Steve  --  03 - Detroit Lions

Football  --  players  --  Sanders, Barry  --  01  -- winning Heisman Trophy at OSUFootball  --  players  --  Sanders, Barry  --  02  -- 1989 rookie running back at Detroit Lions

Football  --  players  --  Sanders, Barry  --  03  -- Detroit Lions

Football  --  players  --  Tillman, Spencer  --  01

Spencer Tillman was another outstanding running back at the University of Oklahoma. He went on to a broadcast career in which he announces football games and/or is a half-time commentor. He is also in great demand as a speaker by corporations and Christian churches.

Football  --  players  --  Tillman, Spencer  --  02

And . . . here are a few more cartoons for your enjoyment.

 

Cartoon-Dennis-MomIsSmart
Football  --  Cartoon  --  05

Football  --  Cartoon  --  10

Football  --  Cartoon  --  12

Football  --  Cartoon  --  13

 

Football  --  Cartoon  --  15

Football  --  Cartoon  --  16Football  --  Cartoon  --  quote from ERma Bombeck  --  01

humor_football_text

Oh, to give you something else to laugh about, here are photos of me during my “lustrous” high school and college football career. I fought for the “Flashes” of dear ol’ Fillmore, California high school. 

1957-001--C StanParegien---football

1957-063--Coaches-EdSimmons-LarrySullivan-FUHS

1958-045--H--1984 article about '58 Football Team by Charles Mozley

1958-132-FUHS-FootballCoaches

1958-134---StanParegien--FUHS-Football--fall57

And I played football one year at a very small religious school, Columbia Christian College, in Portland, Oregon. I played quarterback, but only because the coach decided we were in dire need of the best athlete at the running back position. The best thing one could say about our team is that we still had enough guys to finish the season . . . and we were nothing if not consistent. We lost every game.

1961-036 football-StanParegien

1961-037--B Stan Paregien, right, at Portland, OR - Columbia Ch Col

I’m #15, the one with the ball and headed for a bad wreck. About the third game of the year my right foot was fractured and that was the end of my football days.

 

And now, . . . a word from our sponsor.

Oh, hey, that’s me.

 

I want to draw your attention to the fact that I have more than a dozen eBooks available for purchase online (Amazon.com ; BarnesandNoble.com; etc.). Here are just two of them.

1400w x 200dpi -- AA-- Book Cover - Woody Guthrie - By Stan Paregien Sr -2012----1400w

and . . .

0000--Cover--JimShoulders--StanParegienSr (4)

Go to:  www.smashwords.com and then enter “Stan Paregien, Sr.” in the search box. That will bring up my biography and, below that, every one of the eBooks that I have published through them and a profile of each. You may order online right there in seven different formats, including the popular PDF format.

That’s about it for this time, friends. Soon I will resume my extended profile of presidential candidate Marco Rubio. 

— Stan

AA  Fair Use Disclaimer - 01 -- designed on by Stan Paregien Sr on 2016-02-01

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