Category Archives: Senior Citizens

Issue 379 – 1984: A Vintage Year

Logo -- The Paregien Journal -- 2018--01--18 -- 800 X 195 pix X 400 dpi

Issue 379     –     Dec. 10, 2018     –     An Occasional Blog by Stan Paregien

I’ve been to a great many funerals over my lifetime and presided at many of ’em as the clergyman or one doing the eulogy. I can truthfully say that too many of them were either far too long and/or way too somber and formal. I know, ’cause I preached some like that in the early years of my ministry.

However, I learned a lot about what to do and not do and about what to say and what to avoid when I was an Associate Minister at the Mayfair Church of Christ in Oklahoma City from 1968 to 1970 or so. That is because I observed and learned from a master public speaker and encourager: Virgil R. Trout, the Minister of the congregation. His regular Sunday morning and evening sermons were 15 to 20 minutes long, and they were among the most therapeutic, encouraging and instructive I ever heard. 

Virgil was especially skilled at personalizing the funerals for which he was the officiant. I went with him a few times on occasions where a funeral home just needed someone to say a few words over the deceased, with few (if any) family or friends in attendance. Still, by the time he ended his short eulogy you felt the person in the casket was important, because Virgil reminded us God feels that way about each of us and believes in us right to the end. 

Okay, so what has all that to do with the title of this blog, “1984: A Vintage Year”? Good question.

This week, on Wednesday and Thursday, millions of us watched on TV as our nation and the world said goodbye to George H.W. Bush, the 41st President of the United States and the father of the 43rd President. He was a remarkable man, not only for his many career achievements, but for his plain decency, his unfailing loyalty to friends, his sense of humor, and his strong love for his God, his country and his family. Quite a guy. 

The first funeral for Mr. Bush was in the magnificent National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Every detail was perfectly choreographed. It had to be with that many people and world-wide TV coverage. Yes, I think it was far too long (about 3 hours worth). If I had been there, I would have had to run to the nearest restroom at least twice during that three-hour extravaganza.

It was even a tad funny to see all those presidents (one present and three ex-presidents) and their wives sitting in the same pew. The Obamas and the Clintons were more than a little uncomfortable being so close to the guy who had been smearing them for the last three years. But it was good for all of them and for the nation to see them working through that moment.

But let it be said that the military and the police and Secret Service did there their just as they were trained. The musicians, singers and speakers were all in sync to produce a memorable experience. It was inspirational and instructive. It unapologetically showed all who were paying attention the importance President Bush and Barbara and their whole clan put on a personal walk with God and a real relationship with Jesus Christ.

The second funeral, at the Bush’s family Episcopal Church in Houston, was a replica of the first. Same officiating minister, for one thing. It was different in the details or ceremonies or length (mercifully, it was only about 90 minute), but no difference in the vivid witness of a grieving family who lost both Barbara and George within a seven month span and yet relied on faith, family and friends to make it through the long days and to move on.

Wow. It was all just a positive shot in the arm for me and I think for the nation. Their preacher, a Rev. Levenson from the Episcopal Church in Houston presided at both services, plus the burial. 

Our son Stan Jr. lives in the St. Louis, Missouri area. He called us that night a few hours after the body of President George H.W. Bush had been taken for burial next to his wife and their daughter inside the walls of the George Bush Library in College Station, Texas (our daughter, Stacy, lives and works just a hop, skip and a jump from there. She and her daughter, our granddaughter Christal Magness, drive by there every day). 

As Peggy and I visited with Stan Jr., I said: “You know, it seems like I went over to Tulsa one time to hear ol’ George speak. I couldn’t tell you a thing about it, but I believe it was right in downtown Tulsa and was some kind of a rally or fundraiser of some sort.”

“Hey, dad,” Stan Jr., said. “I went with you to that event. It was down there in the heart of Tulsa. And, yes, we got to see Mr. Bush.”

See there, all you doubters, I haven’t really lost as much of my brain power as you thought. More than I’d like, but just not that much. We did not get very close to Mr. Bush in Tulsa, but here is the one and only photo I took of him:

1984--065--OK--Tulsa---George Bush speaking in downtown plaza -- Copyrighted by Stan Paregien Sr

Quotes from George H.W. Bush

It is my considered judgment that you [sitting President Richard Nixon] should now resign. I expect in your lonely, embattled position this would seem to you as an act of disloyalty from one you have supported and helped in so many ways. My own view is that I would now ill serve a president, whose massive accomplishments I will always respect and whose family I love, if I did not now give you my judgment. — George H.W. Bush on August 1974, speaking to President Richard Nixon shortly before he resigned, when Bush was Republican national chairman.

And my opponent won’t rule out raising taxes. But I will. And the Congress will push me to raise taxes, and I’ll say no, and they’ll push, and I’ll say no, and they’ll push again. And I’ll say to them: Read my lips. No new taxes. — George H.W. Bush on Aug. 18, 1988, during his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention.

I do not like broccoli, and I haven’t liked it since I was a little kid and my mother made me eat it. And I’m president of the United States, and I’m not going to eat any more broccoli.” — George H.W. Bush on March 22, 1990.

To those who say we no longer need a CIA, I say you’re nuts. To those who want to dismantle CIA or put it under some other department … you’re nuts, too. And to those who feel the right to know takes precedence over legitimate classification of documents or over protecting our most precious asset, our people, the same to you. You’re nuts, and so’s the horse you came in on.” — George H.W. Bush on Sept. 17, 1997, at ceremony marking the 50th birthday of the CIA.

I have opinions of my own, strong opinions, but I don’t always agree with them.—George H.W. Bush

I’m conservative, but I’m not a nut about it.   – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

We are a nation of communities… a brilliant diversity spread like stars, like a thousand points of light in a broad and peaceful sky. — George H. W. Bush

I’m not trying to get myself up a notch on the ladder by shoving somebody else down on the ladder, whether it’s a candidate or the president of the United States or anybody else. I just don’t believe that’s the way one oughta campaign, I’ve never done that.  – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

You know I vowed when I became President not to talk about the loneliest toughest job in the world and I didn’t. — George H. W. Bush

I have a form of Parkinson’s disease, which I don’t like. My legs don’t move when my brain tells them to. It’s very frustrating.  – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

We must act on what we know. I take as my guide the hope of a saint: In crucial things, unity; in important things, diversity; in all things, generosity. – George H. W. Bush in 1989.

I have climbed perhaps the highest mountain in the world [i.e., having been President of the United States], but even that cannot hold a candle to being Barbara’s husband. – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

There is a God and He is good, and his love, while free, has a self-imposed cost: We must be good to one another.  – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

In what has been deemed his “most devastating” quote of all time, the former president promised voters “no new taxes” during the 1988 Republican National Convention in New Orleans: “Read my lips: no new taxes” (Aug. 18, 1988). It certainly wasn’t the first time a presidential candidate broke a campaign promise when he became president, but it proved catastrophic for Bush, who raised taxes on the wealthy and lost his re-election campaign in 1992.

Don’t forget: Old guys can still have fun and still do stuff. — – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.  Mr. Bush met with Headline News anchor Robin Meade on June 16, 2009, just four days after his 85th birthday, Those words were addressed to Meade by Bush to explain what they were getting ready to do. Then they went up in a perfectly good airplane and each of them, joined to an expert jumper, parachuted safely to the ground. President George H.W. Bush did the same thing on his 90th birthday, too.

No nation can fully understand itself or find its place in the world if it does not look with clear eyes at all the glories and disgraces, too, of the past. We, in the United States, acknowledge such an injustice in our own history: The internment of Americans of Japanese ancestry was a great injustice, and it will never be repeated.  – George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the U.S.

The Class of 1959

We had a class reunion for our Class of 1959 (Fillmore Union High School in Fillmore, Calif.) in the summer of 1984. Here are a few photos of those who attended. Yep, I was there as well.

1984--002 Fillmore, CA -- Reunion of the HS Class of 1959

1984--002--A Fillmore, CA Reunion of the HS Class of 1959

 

1984--003 Fillmore, CA -- Reunion of the HS Class Of 1959

1984--004--A Reunion of the HS Class Of 1959

1984--004-C Reunion of the Class of 1959 -- Cartoon

1984--004-D Reunion of the Class of 1959 -- Cartoon

1984--004-E Fillmore, CA Reunion of the Class of 1959 -- Chili Blagg - Pat Brown - Mary Ann Shipley Real - Roger France

1984--005 Fillmore, CA - Reunion of Class of 1959 - poem by Stan Paregien

By now, many of those folks shown in the photos above have died. Next May, 2019 will mark the 60th anniversary of when we all graduated in 1959 from Fillmore High School. No, I have no plans to attend any reunion. 

1984--007--StacyParegien

Our lovely daughter, Stacy Paregien in 1984.

 

1984--008--WapanuckaOK--AlumniReunion

This is one of those vintage Wapanucka (Oklahoma) High School’s Reunions. This one in 1984 included my father Harold’s two sisters – Mrs. Alvin (Loretha) Young of Duncan, Okla., and Mrs. John (Eupel ) Higgenbotham of Santa Paula, Calif. – and my stepfather Chester Spradling and his wife (my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling), plus my maternal uncle Harry Snell and his wife (my mother’s sister) Opal Cauthen Snell of Jay, Oklahoma. 

 

1984--009--StanParegien

Little ‘Ol Me in 1984

1984--023--GeneParegien-LisaShields-April13

Stan Paregien Jr. (better known as “Gene” until he went into the Air Force in 1985). He and his date for a prom or such at Stroud, Oklahoma in 1984

1984--025--StroudOK--BoysState-GirlsState

1984--026 Stroud, OK -- City Of Stroud, OK

We lived seven miles north and one mile west of Stroud, Oklahoma in 1984. We had 10 acres of land (our “farm”) which featured an old “shotgun” style house and a couple of nice barns. About 7 of those acres were a good stand of hay which we bailed once or twice a year.

1984--027---StanParegien--Evelyn--LosAngeles

The above photo is of me with my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling, at the airport in Los Angeles in 1984. She was as lovely a person on the inside as she was pretty on the outside. She was a very strong person with a deep love for the Lord and his people . . . and for every person who came her way. She had a servant’s heart, to be sure.

1984--030--B Dallas, TX Evelyn Spradling with founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics

My mother did very well when she was a sales representative for Mary Kay Cosmetics. She worked really hard at it, and she liked to visit with everyone she met. So in 1984 she got to meet the Queen herself, Mary Kay.

1984--035--B Fillmore, CA -- Evelyn Spradling -- Eupel Higgenbotham

Here is a photo of my mom celebrating her 62nd birthday in Fillmore, Calif., by holding up a cake which her daughter, Roberta Paregien Loffswold Fournier, made for her. Looking on, at right, is my father Harold’s youngest sister – Eupel Paregien Higgenbotham of nearby Santa Paula, Calif.

1984--035--D Washinton, DC -- National History Day --- Gene Paregien

Our son, Stan Jr. (“Gene”), and his friend Dess Applegate won this competition two years in a road. So they made two trips to Washington, D.C. Much later, as the chief Public Affairs Officer at Scott Air Force Base in Belleville, ILL, Lt. Col. Stan Paregien, Jr. goes to Washington at least once a year with his base commander to meet with congressmen and senators and, over at the Pentagon, various military leaders. Kinda heady stuff.

1984--036--A Fillmore, CA-- Parade Float -- Spradling -- Gary

This 1984 photo was taken at the annual parade in Fillmore, Calif., sorta saluting “The Old Days.” That’s why my stepfather Chester Spradling and my mom Evelyn (at left) and her cousin Troy & Lucille Gary were dressed up this way. They were on their Mobile Home Park’s float and it won the trophy the unidentified man is holding. These four folks, whom we loved very much, left us several years back. Of all things, Chester Spradling actually grew up in the town of Fillmore. Nope, not Fillmore, California. He was born in tiny Fillmore, Oklahoma. He and his first wife lived in Oxnard, Calif., until she died and he married my mom and moved across the county to live with her. He was a great guy, a real gentleman.

I wrote the following poem, “Our Twenty-Second Anniversary,” in May of 1984. We are now in our 56th year of loving on and living with each other.  It has been quite a journey.

1984--041--A Stroud, OK -- May31 -- Stan Paregien -- poem for our 22nd anniversary

1984--041--B--StroudOK--May31--Peggy--StanParegien--22nd-anniversary

1984--042--StroudOK--StacyParegien--on-Paula

Stacy Paregien on one of the several horses we had at our little farm over the years. She was a very good rider and loved any and all animals (as her mother did/does).

I had Mr. Charles Mozley for Social Studies and as a drama teacher (I was in one play, for which I received an Emmy . . . or was it a Showoff Award. Heck, I forget. Anyway, Mrs. Mozley was a really wonderful teacher and a genuinely nice guy. He was a little funny looking, being a small leprechaun kind of guy with one blue eye and one brown eye. Hey, If I’m lyin’, I’m dyin’. He would stop lecturing every once in a while to state some something he hoped we’d remember. His only words I recall are when he smiled that impish smile and announced, “I have only two faults: I cannot resist pain . . . or temptation.” I’ve thought about that every once in a while over the years. He pretty well summed it up.

In 1984, he got to thinking about which of all our high school football teams was the best to ever play at Fillmore Union High School in Fillmore, Calif. He decided it was the team of 1958 — the team on which I held down the right end position. No, funny people, I was not just at the right end of the bench. I started almost every game. And we beat every doggone team we faced by a bunch. That is, until we played my old school where I went to junior high school, William S. Hart (the silent screen movie star) High School in Newhall (now known as Santa Clarita). Those guys, several of whom I still knew, kicked our butts all over that field in front of 6,000 folks. We lost 25 to zip. And that, dear readers, was the end of that.

1984--057--CA--Fillmore--Football Team of 1958--by Charles Mozley--Sept

1984--059--OK--Stroud--Stacy Paregien -- fall

1984--061--OK--Stroud--Stan 'Gene' Paregien Jr in Letterman jacket -- fall

 

1984--063--B--OK--Stroud--Stan Paregien Sr -- card from Richie Vallen's mother, Connie Valenzuela

When Business People Lie

If they ever put a photo next to “bald-faced lie” in the dictionary, I’d nominate this document. In 1982, the area of Oklahoma and surrounding oil-related states went into a deep recession. The rest of the nation barely noticed, but thousands of families in the area were hit hard. Many banks and oil-related businesses declared bankruptcy and/or went out of business. That included many of my clients when I was in the life & health insurance business. Pretty soon I found myself having to take another job. And that was as a lab technician at Allied Materials Company in Stroud, Okla. We refined crude oil and made and sold jet fuel as well as  roofing tar and related items.

Allied had been in business in Stroud for some 40 years. They provided many of the best-paying jobs in Lincoln County. Then rumors started going around that the company was in trouble. I still have a video recording of the president of our company being interviewed by radio and TV reports. He stood right there and told them there was no truth to the rumors, that the company was doing fine. And below is the letter which he addressed to we employees. He was lying through his teeth.

1984--069--OK--Stroud---Closing down in the fall of '84 the Allied Refinery--where Stan Paregien was working as a lab tech

Things rocked along. We shut down for our regular “turn around,” during which we did major updates and repairs to our equipment. We even had 40 or so certified contract welders taking the place apart and putting it back together. Very expensive job, of course. And then these news stories hit the newspapers and the end was near.

1984--070--OK--Stroud---Closing down in the fall of '84 the Allied Refinery--where Stan Paregien was working as a lab tech

Even our dear sweet, lying dog of a company leader had to admit they were closing the doors on most of our operation. It was terrible news for our community and the entire area.

1984--072--OK--Stroud---Closing down in the fall of '84 the Allied Refinery--where Stan Paregien was working as a lab tech

Even then, he did not tell us all of the truth. The fact is that the Environmental Health Department discovered and proved the company was illegally disposing of toxic materials and asbestos materials at their dump, which was on a creek which flowed right into nearby Deep Fork Creek. Numerous residents learned their water wells had been polluted for many years. So it was a sad, bitter day when 280 were terminated in November of 1984. 

All those refining towers, furnaces, tanks and lines that were updated or repaired a couple of months earlier? A year or two later Allied sold them for scrap metal at pennies on the dollar.

Well, as my all-time favorite radio newsman Paul Harvey used to say after telling a morbid story: “Wash your ears out with the following good news.”

So here is little poem which my sister, Roberta Paregien Loffswold Fournier (Class of 1961 at Fillmore; my wife graduated in the Class of 1961 at nearby Ventura High) wrote:

1984--089 A poem, 'My Home Town - Fillmore, Calif' - by Roberta Paregien Loffswold Fournier - died on June 5, 2015

There you have it, a roundup of reasons why I could say why 1984 was a “Vintage Year” for us in particular. A few hard knocks, but lots of wonderful times with friends and family. 

Thanks to the good Lord for helping us make it through another year. There were even bigger changes ahead. Stay tuned for more sometime down the road.

— Stan

Logo---The End---Zia--with-blue---- 500w x 400dpi--- 2018--01--17

THE END. Or pert near it.

Issue 377 – Time Changes Pert Near Everything

Logo -- The Paregien Journal -- 2018--01--18 -- 800 X 195 pix X 400 dpi

Issue 377          Sept. 29, 2018           An Occasional Blog  

Time Changes Pert Near Everything

The great western crooner, Tommy Duncan, sang a song during the 1940s titled “Time Changes Everything.” It is a ballad about lost love, that he thought she would always love him. But over time, that changed. Then he thought he would never get over, but . . . shazam . . . time changed that. Finally, he wishes her well as he rides off in the sunset with his new love. Change, change, change.

Well, there’s a lot of truth in that ol’ Bob Wills western swing ballad.  But to state it a little more accurately and in the words of my unhousebroken cousin Bubba, “Time changes pert near everything.”

For example, you graduate from high school and your class fractures into minute pieces. Some kids go off to college or off to the military or off elsewhere for a job  . . . and a few just, well, go off. One day you realize not even Humpty Dumpty can’t put those pieces back together. 

Or you reach that mid-life crisis point where you must face up to the fact that you’re never going to be President of the United States. Heck, you’re not even going to be a leader in your Lions Club or your church. Last week you got a letter confirming your rich uncle left you his favorite poodle, but nothing else. And chances are high you aren’t going to see your own children reach any high level of success. And you’ve just about concluded you just ain’t very good lookin’ no mo. 

Shoot-fire, y’all, it gets worse. You become a senior citizen somewhere about 60 or 65. That’s when you notice the wheels starting to fall off your wagon, and you never were very mechanically inclined. You sorta think you’re a cut above most old folks, . . . until you count the number of prescription pills you take each day. And you tally up the aches and pains and dysfunctional parts of your anatomy and realize that if a part of you doesn’t hurt, it is probably not working.

Yep, time changes . . . pert near every aspect of our lives.

That’s what I’m talking about, friends, the changes that will not be ignored. They trip us on our way to the bathroom and slap us up side of the head to get our attention.

Okay, fellow travelers, I freely confess I kinda feel like I have the Elephant-of-Change sitting on my chest. Maybe if I scratch its back that Dumbo will go squat somewhere else, but he is probably like my nutty brother-in-law, Alex. He will be back much more often than I’d like.

CHANGE 1

Well, here is the first of several changes I am making: I will no longer give public performances of my storytelling (i.e., cowboy poetry, stories, songs and guitar playing). That tough decision comes after having had a heap of fun doing those things since about 1991 — about 27 years worth. In that regard, here is a poem I performed on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018 during my very last session at the National Cowboy Symposium & Celebration in Lubbock, Texas. I call this poem, my 488th, “On Hitting a Wall at 77.”

Poem 488 - On Hitting a Wall at 77 - by Stan Paregien - July 20, 2018 Page 1 of 2

Poem 488 - On Hitting a Wall at 77 - by Stan Paregien - July 20, 2018 Page 2 of 2

2018--09--06 01 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium

 

2018--09--06 05 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium2018--09--06 06 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium

2018--09--07 05 Lubbock, TX - - National Cowboy Symp - LeRoy & Sandra Jones - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--07 09 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Stan & Peggy Paregien with Sandra & LeRoy Jones

2018--09--07 13 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Janice Deardorff performing - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 02--C Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Stan Paregien - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--08 02--E Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Robert Beene - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--08 03 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Joel Nelson - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 05 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Chris Isaacs - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 06 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Pipp Gillette - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--09 03 Lubbock, TX - - Stan Paregien & Perry Williams - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--09 08 Lubbock, TX - - National Cowboy Symposium

CHANGE 2

My second change is this: I’m am saying adios and farewell to all my social media.

Yes, Virginia, ’tis true. I shut down — i.e., deleted — my Facebook account just last week. Oh, yeah, I’ll miss seeing some photos of our kids and grandkids and great-grandkids that somehow never get seen to us in any other way. And I’ll miss that good clean joke which crossed my screen every once in a while, but life goes on. And so do I.

Oh, I guess I should mention those somewhere over 300 folks who friended me on Facebook. Some of those folks are really good friends, with a few of them dating back from six or more decades ago. Those I’ll miss a bunch, but . . . I still have a telephone (yes, a smarter-than-me phone and a land-line) and the U.S. Post Office still delivers to my mailbox (though 90 % of which I get is non-personal) . . . so I can be reached. Now I admit to being blissfully unaware of just how 40 or so of my “Friends” on Facebook had any real connection with me. Too much drama. Too much trivia. Just . . . way too much.

CHANGES THAT REALLY HURT

Part of the big changes I’m seeing in my life have to do with the passing of close friends and relatives . . . and the demise of so many people who, though not close friends, were folks I knew at one time or have corresponded with for a while or  people for whom I had a long-distance and long-standing admiration.

In this blog I just want to mention some of our friends we always saw at the National Cowboy Symposium and elsewhere, but who have crossed over that Big Divide. Here is just part of that list:

**********  DUSTY & PAT RICHARDS

 

 

The first time I met Ronald Lee (“Dusty”) Richards was in 1984 in Branson, Missouri. A few weeks earlier I had met Jory Sherman at a writers convention in Oklahoma City. It was Jory who told me all about the great folks in the Western Writers of America and about that year’s convention in a short time in Branson. At his urging, I traveled there alone and walked into the host hotel’s lobby. There an elderly man looked at my cowboy hat, walked over to me and introduced himself to me. It was none other than Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson, the author of numerous Western articles and novels and movie and TV scripts. 

A short time later I met a fledgling writer from Springdale named Dusty Richards, and we hit it off right away. Between the WWA, other writer conventions and the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock,  Peggy and I saw Dusty and Pat many, many times over the years. He was a “late bloomer” who did not have his first book published until 1992, when he was 55 years old. But, golly Bill, he caught on fire there. He wrote some 150 western novels, many under various publishing “house names.” One of those novels, The Mustanger & the Lady, was made into a movie with the title, “Painted Woman.”

2000-011--TX-Lubbock--DustyRichards-PaulPatterson-StanParegien

Paul Patterson was the high school literature teacher who became a mentor out in West Texas to none other than the late, great Western novelist Elmer Kelton. 

2002-051-- Lubbock, TX -- Pat and Dusty Richards - National Cowboy Symposium

Those times are now behind us, wonderful memories we will cherish. Dusty and Pat Richards were in a horrific car accident in December of 2017. They were hospitalized in critical condition. Pat died from her injuries on Jan. 11, 2018 and Dusty left this life one week later on Jan. 18, 2018. He was 80 years old.

Dusty and Pat loved their adopted home state of Arkansas, as well as Arizona and the great Southwest. A writer for the family posted this on Dusty’s Facebook page:

“What can we say about Dusty? The real question is what can’t we say about him? To say that he was larger than life is the grandest of understatements. He was an irresistible force and an unmovable object all rolled into one, a personality wider than the western skies he wrote about. He was an eternal optimist, a man who woke up each and every day renewed and ready for the next job, the next challenge, the next good fight. He was a father, a patriarch, a mentor of the first order.

“He toured the  country teaching and encouraging new and experienced writers alike, challenging them to follow his lead, tell the next inspiring story, pen the next Great American Novel. He was a fighter, a lover, a joker, an entrepreneur, a canny businessman, a television and radio personality, a famous rodeo announcer, a cowboy, and, perhaps above all else, a master storyteller. Dusty was everything that fit under his trademark ten-gallon hat and so much more, and we could keep writing for a year and not do him justice.”

**********  HENRY TORRES

Torres, Henry - died at age 80 in a hospital in Rio Rancho, NM

**  Henry Torres, a rancher and historian and cowboy poet, died on April 6, 2018 at the age of 80. He was born to Hispanic parents on Nov. 7, 1937. He grew up in that farming and ranching family, with most of his time spent on ranches in New Mexico — from Deming to Las Cruces and up to Silver City.  He had two beloved sisters, Beatrice and Elsie, where were some older than he. Henry joined the U.S. Navy right after graduating from high school, but came back in 1960 to again work for and with his father. 

This cowpoke went above his learnin’ and married Carolyn Shores in 1971. Henry spent much of his adult career ranching on the side and working as a Brand Inspector for the New Mexico Livestock Board. He retired as the Supervisor in Silver City in 1996. A few years before his retirement, he got interested in writing and publically performing cowboy poetry. He was of the founders and supporters of the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum in Las Cruces, NM. And he was the primary force behind the creation of their annual “Cowboy Days” celebration.

In 2002, Henry Torres felt very blessed when he received an “American Cowboy Culture” award at the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock, Texas. In 2016, he was recognized in a ceremony at the Las Cruces New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum for his many years of service to the industry and to the museum. In 2011, Carolyn Torres was seriously sick and wanted to move to Nevada to spend her last days close to their children and grandchildren, and they left their beloved New Mexico. She died in 2014, so Henry moved back to Silver City. He lived and died as a man of his word, a cowboy to the bone.

**********  GUY W. LOGSDON

Peggy and I first met Guy Logsdon in about 1990 at the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock, Texas. He had a both at the convention center where he sold new and used and collectable books. When he went back to Tulsa and started “The Oklahoma Cowboy Poetry Gathering” at the National Western Museum & Heritage Center in Oklahoma City. He was kind enough to invite me to perform there several times. Now he is gone.

 Guy William Logsdon was born on May 31, 1934 in Ada, Okla. He grew up there, played bass fiddle and then the guitar, in the Logsdon family band. Then added singing and storytelling to his skills. He graduated from Ada High School and then attended and graduated from East Central State University there is Ada. While getting educated, he also got married to Phyllis Landers from up the road in Okemah (hometown of the legendary singer and songwriter Woody Guthrie).

1991-014 GuyLogsdon-StanP-closeup

 Later, Guy received M.S. degree in Library Science and his Doctorate of Education from the University of Oklahoma. His first job was as Director of Libraries at prestigious University of Tulsa. Over time he became a recognized expert in three very different fields: (1) the life and music of Woody Guthrie; (2) Western swing music and the lives of Bob & Johnnie Lee Wills; and (3) old-time authentic cowboy music. 

Cover----Guy Logsdon--800 px

Dr. Logsdon wrote the liner notes for both Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger compilation CDs which were produced by Smithsonian Folkways. His books include “The University of Tulsa: A History, 1882-1972;” “The Whorehouse Bells Were Ringing and Other Songs Cowboys Sing;” “Ada, Oklahoma, Queen City of the Chickasaw Nation: A Pictorial History;” “Saddle Serenaders;” “The Flip of the Coin; the Story of Tommy Allsup;” and  “Woody’s Road; Woody Guthrie’s Letters Home, Drawings, Photos, and Other Unburied Treasures” co-authored with Mary Jo Guthrie Edgmon (Woody’s youngest sister). Guy Logsdon himself was the subject of Stan Paregien’s eBook, “Guy W. Logsdon: Award-winning Folklorist,” and a main source of first-hand information for Stan’s book, “Woody Guthrie: The Man, His Music & His Myth.”

 Guy Logsdon died Feb. 5, 2018 after a short illness. He and Phyllis had been married for 64 years. One of their daughters, Cindy Logsdon Black, is married to and performs with noted cowboy poet and storyteller Baxter Black.

**********  GAIL T. BURTON

Burton, Gail Travis - 1929 to 2017 - cowboy poet in Benton, ARPeggy and I first met Gail T. Burton (Benton, AR) at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Center in Oklahoma City in about 1991. That was when Dr. Guy W. Logsdon of Tulsa organized the very first “Oklahoma Cowboy Poetry Gathering.” He and I each performed there, and we would perform together at many other events over the years. Burton began writing and performing his own cowboy poetry and before he stopped he had created more than 500 poems.  He also wrote a book titled, “Cow Pies and Candle Lights” (1999).

Gail Travis Burton died on Feb. 22, 2017 at his home in Benton, Arkansas at the age of 88. He had been born Jan. 4, 1929 in Temple, OK. Ten months after his birth the United States and much of the world would be floundering the economic disaster we now call “The Great Depression.” Well, Gail grew up and served Uncle Sam as a soldier in the Army and was stationed in Korean from 1946 to 1948. Later, he took specialized training at Oklahoma State University and spent the rest of his life as a Fire Protection Specialist in California and in Arkansas.

g2000-88

Peggy Paregien took this photo at the 1st Annual Oklahoma Poetry Gathering at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Center in Oklahoma City. LEFT TO RIGHT: Okay, here’s where my memory has slipped a cinch. I cannot remember the fellah at the left, seems maybe he was a professor at Oklahoma Panhandle State University way out at Goodwell, Okla. Anybody know his name? That bare-faced gent 2nd from left is , . . . uh . . . give me a second . . . oh, yeah. Me. Stan Paregien. And the lady is Francine Robison, the pride of Tecumseh, OK. And on the far right is Gail T. Burton.

Burton was a deacon at First Baptist Church of Benton. He was also a Master Mason and a member of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. In addition, he was a member of the Missouri Cowboy Poet’s Association, and a charter member of the Academy of Western Artists. He was survived by his wife of 65 years, Barbara Burton and their five  children, 15 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

How Far Is It to Bethlehem?

by Gail T. Burton of Benton, AR

“How far is it to Bethlehem,”
a young cowboy asked his pard’
while riding ‘cross the open range
as the snow was falling hard.
It was coming on to Christmas,
and the two were out alone,
pushing cows to lower pasture
where the blizzard hadn’t blown.

“I know it’s past Chicago,
crosst’ the ocean anyhow;
I still don’t know just where it’s at,
but a far piece I’d allow.”
His partner rode a while in thought,
like he hadn’t even heard.
“It’s a right far piece from Heaven,
you can take me at my word.”

That’s all he said for ‘most an hour,
while they hazed the cattle slow,
but his thoughts were on the Christ child
as they trudged on through the snow.
On the thought of that first Christmas,
and the gift God sent to earth,
of the truth of Jesus’ coming,
and the blessing of His birth.

While riding on he understood
Where these thoughts of Christmas lead,
And bringing words up from his heart
The old cowboy softly said:
“I’ve no clue to mark the distance,
of the mile, ….. I’m at a loss.
How far is it to Bethlehem?
It’s just half way to the cross.”

© 2004, Gail T. Burton

 

I reckon that’s more’n enough rambling for one session. Thank you, sincerely, for stopping by. Adios for now. 

 

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Issue 376 – The Florida Scene

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Issue 376     –     June 20, 2018     –     An Occasional Blog by Stan Paregien Sr.

 

The Florida Scene

2018--06--17 02 Sarasota, FL - Ruth & Dr Brian Smith - Central Ch of Christ - by Stan Paregien - iPad

2018--06--08 01 Bradenton, FL - sunrise over Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien - Motorola Z2 Play

2018--06--08 02 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien & light shoes - by Stan Paregien - Motorola Z2 Play

2018--06--08 03 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien & light shoes - by Stan Paregien - Motorola Z2 Play

2018--06--09 19 Palmetto, FL - signs in thrift store bathroom - by Stan Paregien - Motorola Z2 Play

2018--06--09 20 Palmetto, FL - signs in thrift store bathroom - by Stan Paregien - Motorola Z2 Play

Birds -- pooping on cars -- cartoon

2018--06--18 01 Bradenton, FL - sunrise at Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien - Moto Z2 Play

2018--06--09 11--A Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien's flowers

2018--06--09 12 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien's flowers

New Technology, New Headaches

2018--06--11 01 Bradenton, FL - Verizon agent Keith Hardter helping us - by S Paregien

After being with AT&T for 18 years, we switched this month to Verizon. Also gave away our iPhones  and took ownership of our new Motorola Z2 Play. Nicer camera, but nutty organization. High tech product, but we’re low tech seniors and were adrift at sea for a week . . . and still struggling with where to find what.

It wasn’t like back in the “good old days” when we bought our iPhones at an AT&T store. They kindly set up an appointment with the Apple Store for a rep to walk us through those mind-boggling phones. We got down there, with maybe 50 other customers in the store, and a teenie-bopper with a ring in her nose came to help us. “What questions do you have” she said a bit impatiently. I didn’t appreciate her question so I said, “We only have one question how do we use it and every option.” She didn’t know what to do with that. Showed us how to turn it on and off and another thing or two. Then she looked at her watch and said, “Sorry, but your fifteen minutes is up.” “What???” says I, in shock that two seniors switching from flip-phones to iPhones only got 15 minutes of help. But that was it. She was done.

 I have to say the gentleman shown above, Keith Hardter at Verizon’s office at 14th St. & Cortez Road in Bradenton, was very courteous and extremely patient in answering our many, many questions (hey, in the last 6 or 8 years we had at least learned enough to have questions). However, as our beloved President Trump says five times a day, “We’ll just have to wait and see.”  Hmmmmm.

A Girlie Eatery

2018--06--11 02 Bradenton, FL - We ate lunch at the Chicken Salad Chick cafe - by S Paregien

2018--06--11 03 Bradenton, FL - We ate lunch at the Chicken Salad Chick cafe - by S Paregien

The restaurant above, was okay but not exactly my kind of place. Didn’t even list on the menu a chicken-fried steak or a side of mashed potatoes and white gravy. Oh, well. Peggy liked it. It is in the shopping center at 75th Street West and Cortez Road in Bradenton.

Wild Life in Our MHP

2018--06--12 01 Bradenton, FL - wild Florida bird - by S Paregien

Truth in Advertising, Maybe

2018--06--12 03 Bradenton, FL - Anglo American Lawn Services - hmmmm - by S Paregien

The previous owners of our 55+ MHP contracted with this company to mow and trim our lawns, some 270 of them plus the common areas. One day I actually paid attention to the name of the outfit, “Anglo American Lawn Services.” I was a bit taken back. Are they making a statement that they don’t hire Hispanic undocumented workers who are here illegally? Or are they saying something more? I know they have many different races working for them, so I’m curious. Guess I’ll just use my favorite non-dictionary word, “Hmmmm.”

Peggy Sets a Lovely Table

2018--06--13 03 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien with our Franciscan 'Apple Pattern' dishes - by Stan Paregien Paregien

2018--06--14 02 Bradenton, FL - flags in our cowboy boot - by Peggy Paregien

2018--06--14 03 Palmetto, FL - gathering storm clouds - by Peggy Paregien

Flag Day in Our Community

2018--06--14 20--A Bradenton, FL - Flag Day in Plantation Grove MHP - by S Paregien

2018--06--14 20--B Bradenton, FL - flags in our cowboy boot - by Peggy Paregien

The above is our place, complete with a cowboy boot. My real, honest-to-goodness cowboy boots are in my closet. Can’t wear ’em, except for a short time that doesn’t involve much walking or extending standing. I found out out eight years ago I have an unpleasant condition called “plantar fasciitis” in both feet. Wearing cowboy boots was about the worst thing I could do for my feet that have hurt something awful for many years, but I often did so at cowboy events . . . and paid handsomely for it. I went through weeks of physical therapy and one operation and the end result is . . . drum roll, please . . . I have plantar fasciitis in both feet. Still.

2018--06--14 20--C Bradenton, FL - Flag Day - Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien

2018--06--14 20--D Bradenton, FL - Flag Day - Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien

2018--06--14 20--E Bradenton, FL - Flag Day - Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien

2018--06--14 20--F Bradenton, FL - Flag Day - Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien

A Stranger in Town

2018--06--14 21 Palmetto, FL - Stan Paregien with 'Corona Man' - by P Paregien

Our MHP Just Sold for Only $21 Million

2018--06--16 10--A Sales of PG MHP and others - BRADENTON HERALD

2018--06--16 10--B Sales of PG MHP and others

The Night Virginia Fell in Love . . . 

With Spanish Food & Mariachis

2018--06--18 10 Bradenton, TX - Peg Paregien, Virginia Corbin at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 11 Bradenton, TX - Virginia Corbin at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 12 Bradenton, TX - Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 13 Bradenton, TX - Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 17 Bradenton, TX - Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 19 Bradenton, TX - Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 20 Bradenton, TX - Virginia Corbin, Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

2018--06--18 21 Bradenton, TX - Virginia Corbin, Tampa Mariachi Band at at Mi Pueblo - by S Paregien

I dunno but Virginia seems to be saying, “Mercy, these guys are awfully good looking.” I doubt she even noticed their tight pants and how they sometimes strutted and shook their booty. Kinda like “Hooters for women,” maybe.

Holmes Beach Respite

2018--06--19 02 Bradenton, FL - Holmes Beach - old geezer - by Peggy Paregien

2018--06--19 03 Bradenton, FL - Holmes Beach - Peggy Paregien - by S Paregien

About 9:00 am on Tuesday, June 19th, I suddenly thought about how we hadn’t been to the beach lately (a week or more). I mentioned that to Peggy and one hour later we were nestled in a quiet corner of Holmes Beach. The water temperature was about 85 and the air temperature that or a little more. It was low tide and we were able to wade out about 50 yards to a sandbar where the water was about waist-high on me. Very relaxing, especially with the love of my life. Another day in Paradise well spent.

2018--06--19 04 Bradenton, FL - Holmes Beach - by S Paregien

2018--06--19 05 Bradenton, FL - old couple on Holmes Beach - by S Paregien

Aging -- Florida -- Dentures CLOSE TO HOME cartoon 2018

2018--06--19 07 Bradenton, FL - 2 young kids on Holmes Beach - by S Paregien

2018--06--19 03 Bradenton, FL - Holmes Beach - beautiful day - by Peggy Paregien

Beach - Florida -- I need to go to the beach

2018--03--15 01 Bradenton, FL - ONE OF LEAST-AFFORDING REGIONS IN FL

2018--03--25 01 Bradenton, FL -- Manatee Population Keeps Growing -- Part 01

2018--03--25 01 Bradenton, FL -- Manatee Population Keeps Growing -- Part 02

2018--03--25 01 Bradenton, FL -- Manatee Population Keeps Growing -- Part 03

. . . And Night Fell, Sorta

2018--06--15 01 Bradenton, FL - 'cotton-candy' sunrise - Plantation Grove MHP - by Stan Paregien

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Issue 373 – Six Freebies for You

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The Paregien Journal  —  Issue 373  —  Feb. 24, 2018  —  Published Occasionally

Six Freebies for You

Free--002--round, red button

I have a number of free documents posted on my Google Drive storage account in a public folder.They are all in the popular PDF format, and all you have to do to read them is to go to the link below.

In addition, you may download any or all of them to your own PC’s hard drive . . . or upload them to your own cloud storage. One big advantage of a cloud account – such as Apple – iCloud; Google – Drive; Microsoft Outlook – OneDrive; etc. – is this: then you will be able to access that material through your PC, your tablet, your laptop, your smartphone, and so forth.

Here are the items I’ve posted there so far:

  1. Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling: Her Story  (1922-2011)

Article cover -- 1975 Photo of Evelyn Paregien Spradling

This is my personal tribute to my mother. I completed this 179 page document and released it on the 7th anniversary of her death – Feb. 23, 2011. This is a remarkable story of her growing up in south-central Oklahoma during the Great Depression, the daughter of dirt-poor sharecroppers, getting married and moving to California where life became a whole lot easier and better. I worked hard to let her love, faith and integrity clearly show. 

This essay really amounts to a book, since it is 180 pages long. It contains well over 300 photos and documents, mainly from her total of 30+ years in Oklahoma and 52 years in Ventura County, California. Many of the stories and photos relate, specifically to towns in which we lived: Santa Paula, Fillmore, Piru and Newhall (in Los Angeles County).

  1. An Open Letter to Christian Friends  (May 18, 1972)

Book cover -- 02 - Open Letter -- May 18, 1972

This document will be of special interest to who grew up in (or are still in) religious groups which grew out of the “Restoration Movement” which started in the United States in about 1804 and rapidly grew. It was a recognition that followers of Christ by those days had divided into warring factions, and an effort to unite those Believers by using the Bible (not denominational creeds and disciples) as the standard for work and worship.

I wrote this letter to a few dozen friends way back on May 18, 1972 to explain why Peggy and I were changing from one Christian segment to another. Then in 2018 I rediscovered the letter and added an explanatory preface and a list of resources. It may also be of historical interest to those who study . . . or have to deal with . . . divisions within Christianity.

One of the factors in our leaving the group we’d been part of for our whole lives was their theological position regarding the use of instrumental music in worship. They were a’gin it. That is, they favored a cappella (voices only) in worship. There are other churches who advocate the same thing, though maybe not was loudly as we did. But that is only a part of the equation, as you will read.

  1. The Day Jesus Died (eBook in 2013)

1968-001 Cover of The Day Jesus Died

This book was published as a hardback in Austin, Texas in 1970. Back then I was a minister, first with the University Church of Christ in Las Cruces, New Mexico and then with the Mayfair Church of Christ in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was a collection of my sermons and magazine articles. It went out of print, but in 2012 or so I started revising many of the chapters. So, as with the more than a dozen other eBooks of mine, you may find them and buy them by simply Googling “books by Stan Paregien.” This PDF copy, however, is free.

  1. Oklahoma Almanac of Facts & Humor: Part 1

Cover--Part 1 -- Oklahoma Almanac--2013 --- Nigh 1773w x 2400 x 95dpi

Published: May 21, 2013. Category: Nonfiction. Foreword by the Honorable George Nye, former Governor of Oklahoma. This eBook is Part 1 of 2 containing facts about the state of Oklahoma. Part 1 covers Achille to Nowata. It is not your grandpa’s boring history book. The author starts by telling the unique stories of 148 towns, including those which are a county seat in one of Oklahoma’s 77 counties. He includes photos, prominent people and humorous stories. Part 1 covers such towns as Ada, Atoka, Broken Arrow, Catoosa, Chandler, Claremore, Clinton, Del City, Durant, Eufaula, Elk City, Erick, Lawton, McAlester, Midwest City, Moore, and Norman.

  1. Manatee County, Florida: Facts, Folks and Photos

 

Master Cover -- Manatee County, FL -- Stan Paregien 01 1,900 X 2,561 X 600 dpi

This eBook is a combination of one part travel guide for the beaches and other attractions in Manatee County, one part who’s who of today’s leaders and yesterday’s heroes and heroines, one part family photo album, and one part a history book containing over 450 photos and 470 biographical sketches. It is written in a conversational style with touches of wit, wisdom, mystery and spice. There’s all kinds of factual information about our beautiful beaches and our vibrant history. But you’ll want to spent a lot of time in Chapter 3. There you’ll see photos and biographical sketches of hundreds of Manatee County people. Learn why the heck we do things like we do them (Hint: “Because that’s how grandma and grandpa used to do it.”) You’ll meet some of our wonderful pioneer families, a great many solid citizens, plus a lot of folks who work doggoned hard to make this County an even better place to live or to visit.

  1. A List of Stan Paregien’s eBooks

This lists the 16 eBooks by Stan Paregien which are available at various retailers online. Also a brief bio.

Here’s the magic link for any or all of the above:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AYwU8g8IZo9v4nwXIBnDaXrpqmd6InRI

PLEASE NOTE:  The link above is subject to being changed at any time without notice.

Happy reading, my friends.

— Stan Paregien

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Issue 372 – Wesley Tuttle & Les Anderson

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 372     –     Jan.  18, 2018   –     A Periodic Publication

Wesley Tuttle & Les Anderson: 

Legends of Country-Western Music

by Stan Paregien

The following photos bring back some of my fondest memories of wonderful friends and sweet, sweet music.

2008-0929- Albuquerque, NM - WMA Festival - MarilynTuttle - Stan Paregien - Betty Anderson - Nov, 208 - by P Paregien

One photo  is of me with Mrs. Wesley Tuttle (Marilyn, on my right) and Mrs. Les “Carrot Top” Anderson (Betty) on my left. Their late husbands were well-known country-western singers and musicians who performed in concerts, on radio shows, and on TV shows such as the popular “Town Hall Party” show which airred in the Los Angeles area. The photo was taken in Albuquerque, NM at the Festival of the Western Music Association in late November of 2008 by Peggy Paregien.

Wesley Tuttle (b. Dec., 1917 in Lamar, Colorado; d. Sept. 29, 2003) had a bunch of hit songs during the 1940s and 1950s. Some of his best-known include his hits in 1945, “With Tears in My Eyes (# 1)” and  “Detour (There’s a Muddy Road Ahead; #4),” “I Wish I’d Never Met Sunshine (a #5 hit in 1946),”  “Tho’ I Tried (I Can’t Forget You; # 4 in 1946)” and “Never,” a duet with his wife which was a # 15 hit in 1947.  He also appeared as a singer and/or musician in a lot of the “B-Western” movies.

1955--005-- B Town Hall Party TV show - 60dpi

1955--005-- C Town Hall PartyTVshow - 600 dpi

Marilyn Tuttle often performed with her husband, Wes, and was in a trio which sang backup for Jimmy Wakely for a long time. 

Tuttle-Wesley-Marilyn-gospelAlbum

When Wesley was converted to Christ, he gave up his career in country music because of the travel, the environment and the types of music he was expected to perform. So he and Marilyn started a career in gospel music. They not only produced most of their own LP-albums but those of many other individuals and groups in gospel music. Later, because his vision was rapidly declining, he was forced to give up performing at all.

1999-054-A Tucson, AZ - Stan Paregien -Wes Tuttles - Suzy Hamblen at WMA Festival

Peggy and I got to know and to love Wesley and Marilyn Tuttle just a few years before his death in 2003. We are still in touch with lovely Marilyn. She continues living in their long-time house in San Fernando, Calif., and reigns as the virtual Queen of many cowboy-western music events across the country.

Here is just a few of the music videos you’ll find at YouTube.com featuring Wesley Tuttle:

Detour (1945)

Wesley Tuttle And His Texas Stars

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwMEhfwPXO8

I Want To Be Wanted (1945)

 

With Tears in My Eyes (1945)

 

Until Dawn (1946)

 

I’d Trade All Of My Tomorrows (1946)

 

When Payday Rolls Around

With Marilyn Tuttle, & Speedy West on the steel guitar

 

Strawberry Roan

 

Hey Good Lookin’ (1957)

(Wes and Marilyn Tuttle on Town Hall Party)

 

A Broken Promise Means a Broken Heart

 

The Yodeling Boogie

(with admiring Marilyn in it, too)

 

If You Don’t, Somebody Else Will  – with Johnny Bond

 

What A Day That Will Be

Wesley & Marilyn Tuttle singing gospel

Until Then (1988)

Wesley & Marlyn Tuttle singing gospel

Oh, hey, I just ran across a recent music video in which Marilyn Tuttle joins with several other singers at the last show of the 1917 Festival of the Western Music Association in Albuquerque, NM. She has long, blond hair and is wearing a black vest and a bright blue sweater. It is wonderful to see her still involved in the music scene. They are performing a lovely song I had never heard before, “If I hadn’t Seen the West.”

Then there is the photo of me with Mrs. Les “Carrot Top” Anderson, also taken in Albuquerque in 2008.

2008-0930 Albuquerque, NM Western Music Assn - -S Paregien & Betty Anderson - by P Paregien

 

Betty’s late husband Les, was born in Arkansas on Feb. 20, 1921 and died in Ollala, British Columbia in Canada on Oct. 4, 2001. Early on he frequently sang and played his guitar or the steel guitar with the famous western swing bandleader Bob Wills.

Les was nicknamed “Red” back then, because of his bright red hair. But for some reason Bob didn’t like that nickname. So eventually someone tagged Les with  “Carrot Top.” He decided to go with the flow and designed his fancy western outfits with large carrots on the front. He played steel guitar with Bob and the Texas Playboys for about four years, from 1942 until the legendary steel guitarist Leon McAuliff returned from World War II in 1946.

Then from 1946 through 1949, Les Anderson was both a soloist and a musician with Spade Cooley & His Orchestra. Cooley’s band (which was first Jimmy Wakely’s band, until he gave it up for the movies) was more mainstream than that of Bob Wills and he was sort of a Glen Miller in a customized cowboy outfit. Les recorded several songs with him.

Over the years Les recorded such ditties as, “My Baby Buckaroo,” “Teardrops on the Roses,” “The Girl Who Invented Kissin’,” “Hoein’ Cotton,” “I’m Hog-tied Over You,” and one novelty song which  my ol’ country cousin Jerry Paregien memorized when we were kids, “Hey, Okie, If You See Arkie.” 

Anderson, Les singer - 03 group - Cliffie Stone's 'Home Town Jamboree' 1200 X 600 dpi

Cliffie Stone was not only a musician and performer himself, but he was a smart businessman and promoter. He began managing the careers of other entertainers, and then started his own highly popular TV show, “Cliffie Stone’s Home Town Jamboree.” It was so popular it pushed Spade Cooley’s TV off the air and replaced it.

Anderson, Les singer - 05 cover of radio transcriptions - 500 X 600 dpi'

Then Les started a six-year run, from 1950 to 1956, being a featured singer and musician doing live concerts and live radio and TV shows with the “Town Hall Party” clan of performers. They performed several times a week at a dance hall in Compton, California and those shows were widely seen throughout southern California.

Anderson, Les singer - 04 color photo on record cover' -- 500 X 600 dpi

After that gig, he took a job with the Showboat Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. He finished that stint in 1961 and pretty much retired from performing. Soon he had moved up north to Ollala, British Columbia. There he became a gentleman rancher and worked some in real estate before retiring completely. 

 I found eight music videos of Les “Carrot Top” Anderson  on “YouTube” recently. Three you might especially enjoy are:

Beautiful Arkansas

(audio, only, of his excellent voice; very nice waltz)

 

Little Red Wagon 

(at Town Hall Party with Marilyn Tuttle directly behind him)

 

New Panhandle Rag

(with Marilyn Tuttle directly behind him)

 

As valuable and enjoyable as these videos are, . . . there is still nothing like going out to an old-time music venue and experiencing the vibes of live performances.

Hey, as the cowboys say, we’re just burnin’ daylight sittin’ here. Which, being translated means, get online right now and “Google” something like “Old Time Music Concerts” and go join the fun.

AA Fair Use Disclaimer - 2018 - 02 for entire newsletter or blog

 

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Issue 362 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal    –    Issue 362    –    September 21, 2017 

When “Hurricane Irma” became more than a run-of-the-mill tropical storm, the weather forecasters began to speak of it in superlatives. “Greatest storm in a hundred years.” “Larger than the state of Texas” (yep, that’s large alright). “Highest wind speed for a hurricane ever recorded.” “Catastrophic water surges followed by giant waves of 30 feet or higher.” “Total and complete destruction possible.”

Kinda makes a non-Floridian nervous.

2017--09--04 Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--A Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--B Hurricane Irma fast approaching US

That’s what happened to Peggy and me. We were going about our business as usual on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 5th. In fact, we were planning on flying out of Tampa on Thursday morning to spend the weekend in Lubbock, Texas. I was scheduled for my 17th year of performing my cowboy poetry and stories at the National Cowboy Symposium at the Civic Center in Lubbock. I hadn’t been in about six years, so I was getting excited about seeing many of my cowboy pals and palettes (yeah, I know, I invented that one).

That did not happen. About noon Peggy came into my study and told me that Governor Scott had just declared a state of emergency in Florida. They were expecting Hurricane Irma to rip through Florida like a chainsaw, leaving death and destruction in her wake.

It didn’t take us long to figure out that by now we had not one chance in heck of flying “standby” anywhere (Peggy worked for Southwest Airlines for some 15 years and earned us free — i.e., standby — flying privileges wherever SWA goes). All flights out of Tampa would be full of paying passengers, no doubt.

Then there was the additional problem of what to do with our dog Bullet. Oh, wait a minute, that was the name of Roy Rogers’ German shepherd. Our little Pomeranian is Allie, and we did not want to leave her behind in harm’s way.

So, with all other options ruled out, we hastily packed a few clothes, our important papers, plus some food and water and such. And, to get a start on what by Wednesday morning would become a marathon snail race, we left in our trusty Kia Sedona van by 3:00 p.m.

We spent Tuesday night at a high-dollar motel in Lake City, Florida, just a few miles south of the Georgia border. There were at least 10 other dogs staying in our doggie motel that night.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6th, we left Lake City, Florida about 8:30 p.m. and joined the heavy traffic headed north to who knows where. Our destination was the home where our long-time friends Darrel and Martha Russell live with their daughter and son-in-law and their boy (Christie, Todd & T.J.). They were all so gracious in putting us up for a couple of nights. We even spent some time perusing a very large antique shop in an old cotton mill in the town of Social Circle, Georgia. Check it out on a map, and you’ll see that the city limits is nearly a perfect circle. Why, I don’t know, even though I asked a few people. Must be a story there.

2017--09--06 Manatee County Preparing for Hurricane Irma - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--07 01--A Social Circle, GA - home of Darrel and Martha Russell - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--07 01--B Social Circle, GA - plaque - Psalm 93 v 04 by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 Old couple at a shelter in Bradenton, FL - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--09 US Rep Vern Buchanan visits Manatee County on Friday, Sept 8

2017--09--09 What to take to a shelter & what to expect - Bradenton Fl Herald

On Friday, Sept. 8th, the forecasters were saying that this part of Georgia could soon expect heavy rain and high winds . . . followed by widespread power outages. So we decided it was time to mosey on a bit further north. Peggy spent more than an hour on the phone trying to book a motel room in Chattanooga. None was available. Nary a single pad. Little did we know, in addition to the untold hundreds of refugees like us, they were hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. So Peggy finally found us a room about 40 miles further up the road at Cleveland, Tennessee.

We took a long way around Atlanta, to keep from fighting that urban traffic. We saw a few scenic spots, traveling the back two-lane and sometimes four-lane roads of rural Georgia. But mostly we saw stoplights and lots of lumber trucks and innumerable strip retail shops and such.

We finally arrived in Cleveland, Tennessee and checked into our motel. It was located right next to paradise, which is to say, next to a Cracker Barrel restaurant. We were a good little boy and girl, though, and avoided our normal “Southern comfort” foods. I’m about six weeks from my next doctor’s appointment and I am determined to exceed his recommendation for me to shed at least 20 pounds (over a 3 month period).

Soon after we had arrived, Peggy discovered that the little meeting we had with a strip of blown truck tire back near Lake City had not just put a dent in our passenger door . . . but it had knocked the peawadden out of the turn sign assembly on the front, passenger side of our car. It was just dangling by a thread. But, using virtually all of my mechanical skills, I found a bungee cord in my tool box. I flawlessly attached one end to a motor mount inside the engine compartment, stretched it down over our grill and expertly attached it to the assembly. Ah, the satisfaction of a job well done. For a while, anyway.

Saturday, Sept. 9th, dawned with a stunningly beautiful day. We left our dog in her large cage in our motel room, and we retraced our steps back to Chattanooga with a list of several things we wanted to see and do. As we approached the downtown area, near the area along the Tennessee River, we noticed how athletic all these Chattanooganites looks. Both men and women were slim and muscled up, with fancy athletic shoes, colorful athletic shorts and shirts, and even with athletic looking bicycles — some with tires no wider than my thumb.

Duh. Then we found out the city was hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. Hundreds of certified athletes and thousands of fans and families crowded the area we had to pass through. There were barricades everywhere so the public could not cross a street during a bycicyle race (not a good idea) or a foot race. We also got to see these way-too-fit folks swimming across the Tennessee River, when they all no doubt had perfectly good swmming pools back at their motels.

Well, here is where the plot thickens. As we were trying to get through this mass of athletic folks, Peggy missed seeing a step down off a curb and hurt her left foot. Not her ankle, the side of her foot. She was in considerable pain, but managed to hobble on down to the river — through three or four of those barriers — to where we bought tickets for the luncheon cruise aboard the Southern Belle Riverboat.

Since her foot was hurting and we were boxed in by the sports activities, we sat at that location for about an hour. Finally, we loaded onto the Riverboat. They had a big and private birthday party going on upstairs, but on the main deck there were probably only about 15 of us. But, off we went. It was a nice little river tour, with a guide giving some history of what we saw.

2017--09--09 05 Chattanooga, TN - World Championship Ironman and Ironwoman contest

2017--09--09 15 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River

2017--09--09 18 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 19 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 20 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

About two hours later, we discovered as we prepared to leave that Peggy’s foot was so swollen and sore that she absolutely could not walk. We informed the boat’s staff of what had happened and our predicament. There was no way she could climb the steep hill up to where all the events were going on. Nor could she manuever through the crowds, nor could she get far enough for me to bring our car close enough to pick her up.

After about 45 minutes of waiting for help, one of the uniformed boat staff — perhaps a captain himself — took a personal interest in our dilemma. He finally agreed to procure a golf cart and give both of us a ride to the streets up above. So this man named Daniel, dressed in a sharp uniform which perhaps passed for an official of some kind, weaved the cart through the barricades and up past the crowd. He even drove about three city blocks, on the public streets, to get to a corner parking spot about two blocks from our car. So, showing my own athleticism (I hate that word and other “ism’s” just like it), I sucked in my stomach and sorta jogged a lot of the way — even up hill — to get our car. I drove down and “Captain Daniel” helped Peggy into the car while I waved the impatient drivers around us. Bless you, Daniel, you were wonderful.

So we high-tailed it out of Chattanooga as fast as the numerous areas under construction and the heavy load of traffic would allow. I managed to get Peggy from the car to our motel room, then I skedaddled a couple of miles down the road to a CVS because they had a practical nurse on duty there. Right. Except, . . . that she had gone to supper right before I arrived. So I bought about $70 of home remedies and hurried back to the motel and put some ice on Peggy’s foot. That seemed to help, but all other activities were out.

We we were “forced” to sit in the room and eat the Sonic burgers I had picked up on the way back from CVS, . . . while we watched our University of Oklahoma “Sooners” (ranked Number 7 at the time) gave #2 ranked Ohio State “Buckeyes” a spanking they won’t soon forget.

In between plays and during the commercials, we watched the weather bulletins. And Hurricane Irma was shifting further west, away from Miami and headed directly toward Tampa (and us at Bradenton). Yikes. And to make matters even more interesting, they had warnings of heavy rain and high winds there in Cleveland, Tenn.

2017--09--09 05 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 1 of 2

2017--09--09 06 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 2 of 2

So . . . we phoned my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in Kingsport, Tennessee (in the northeast corner near Bristol Speedway) and pleaded on bended knees for them to put up a couple of refugees. Now, the Paregien family — our Paregien grandparents (Frank and Mattie) as well as Jerry’s mom and dad and my own mom and dad — know all about being refugees in a foreign country. They all left poverty-stricken Oklahoma in 1942 and moved to Ventura County, California in hopes of getting work in the war industry. And they did exactly that, and their lives and those of their descendants changed dramatically. They all went to work for the U.S. Navy at Port Hueneme (near Oxnard).

Anyway, Jerry and Muriel graciously agreed to take us in as long as we wanted or needed to stay. So we again loaded up Allie and our stuff, leaving Cleveland about 8:00 am on Sunday morning, Sept. 10th. We passed Knoxville and about the time we were to turn north, off of I-40, we saw a sign saying that Sevierville was just 15 miles on east. So we decided to take a quick tour. We stopped at a really beautiful Visitor’s Center and got a bunch of brochures.

That’s when one of the employees walked over the ladies who were helping me and told them their manager had called and said they would shut down at noon Monday because the National Park Service was shutting down the area parks because of dire predictions of heavy rain, high winds and probably trees falling and power losses.

That sure explained why we had seen a mob of cars and RVs headed out of Sevierville as we were headed into town. Now my momma didn’t raise no dummies, so I changed our plans and got right back on the road to Kingsport.

2017--09--10 08 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--10 09 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

We spent a delightful time with Jerry and Muriel in their hillbilly home. Well, okay, it is beautiful and spacious home on a hill, not a cramped log cabin by any means. We spent Sunday night and Monday night there. On Monday I took our car down to a nearby mechanic and he was able to stabilize the turn signal assembly . . . by putting a second bungee cord on it. Naw, not really. He was able to snap it back together for a temporary fix, as it is cracked and some “teeth” are missing.

However, the weather folks were now forecasting those same heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

Well, friends, we’ll continue the story of our evacuation from Florida in our next issue.

Thanks for stopping by.

— Stan Paregien

 

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Issue 358 – Catching Up

The Paregien Journal    –   A Periodic Publication    –    Issue 358   –   July 29, 2017

Catching Up

In my last post, some 16 days ago, I mentioned that I hoped to get on a more regular posting schedule. My intent was to published each and Thursday. Obviously, that didn’t happen and I don’t expect it to happen in the future. 

You see, friends, shortly after that I saw my doctor for my regular 6-month check-up. I was shocked out of my Justin boots by his diagnosis. Full-blown diabetes and a low-functioning thyroid. He told me to change my diet and to lose at least 20 pounds in the next three months. Then I might make it without going on a diabetic routine of meds. He did put me on a pill for the low-thyroid functioning problem. I have noticed that for the last three months or more I just did not have much energy. Low-thyroid will do that. So I started this med and it has knocked me for a loop: a headache for several hours each and every day; frequent nausea; inability to sleep from early morning to 11 pm or so (I had loved my afternoon naps); and no decreasing of my fatigue. After two weeks, those three of those four side-effects have faded. I’m still waiting for it to give me more energy.

Anyway, now you know . . . the rest of the story.  I have sub-titled this blog as “A Periodic Publication.” And that’s about the best I can do for the foreseeable future. Thanks for your understanding. 

A Birthday Bash

We’re having another birthday party for a local celebrity here in Bradenton, Florida. It will happen on Saturday, July 20th. He is a very popular guy and lots of folks come from far and near to take photos of him. That “him” is none other than ol’ Snooty, who was born on July 21, 1948, back when Harry (“Give ‘Em Hell”) Truman was sitting in the White House as President of the U.S.A. He’s not as old as I am, of course, but he is now ancient compared to his peers.

Okay, I’ll tell you . . . the rest of the story. Snooty is a manatee who has lived in a manatee-sized pool in the South Florida Museum for a long, long time. He was born in the Miami Aquarium down south, but packed up his bags and more here at the age of one. The manatees who live wild along Florida’s shores are odd-looking creatures. In the wild, they seldom if ever live beyond their 20’s. Fast-moving boats kill or badly injure many of these gentle giants each year. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Oh, did you know that Bradenton is a city in “Manatee” County? Yep, and the first community was called Manatee but was swallowed up by a faster growing upstart. And our town sits on the south bank of “Manatee” River.” There are lots of those Manatee around, though I have yet to see one in the wild.

Anyway, happy birthday to you Snooty. 

UPDATE:

Unbelievably, Snooty the Manatee died one day after his 69th birthday party. That was on Sunday, July 23, 2017. Officials reported that somehow an access panel door to his pool or aquarium had somehow been knocked loose. The huge, gentle creature was able to go underwater and swim into the small enclosure. When he did not have room to turn around and reach air, again, he drowned. It is quite a tragedy for our community. And those who literally grew up seeing and enjoying Snooty a few times each year were especially saddened.

*****

I am certainly sad to learn that Arizona’s Senator John McCain has been diagnosed with a very aggressive kind of brain tumor called glioblastoma. I have great respect for Senator McCain, though I think he should have retired a few years ago. He spent five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, and he was severely tortured — physically and psychologically — by the Communists during that time. In my book he is a true American hero and a fine gentleman. We hope and pray for his recovery.

*****

I see in “Today’s Birthdays” for July 20th that novelist Cormac McCarthy is now 84. His first novel, The Orchard Keeper, was published in 1965. You probably know him for his 2005 novel, No Country for Old Men, which was adapted into an award-winning film by Joel and Ethan Coen. The movie starred Tommy Lee Jones and one of the supporting cast was a gent we have met a few times at cowboy events, actor Barry Corbin. In 2006, his novel The Road, won a Pulitzer Prize for Literature. And also in 2006 he finished writing a play, “The Sunset Limited.” That was made into an HBO film starring  Samuel L. Jackson and Tommy Lee Jones (directed by Jones).

In the birthdays for July 29th I see the name of none other than Leonard Leroy “Buddy” Lee, born on this date in 1933 and celebrating his 84th year on Mother Earth. Okay, you probably know him better by his stage name, “Robert Fuller.” In 1952, barely out of his teens, he moved to Hollywood to try his luck at acting. He also attended actor Richard Boone’s acting school and started to get small parts.  In 1959, Fuller wanted to do Westerns and came in 2nd to Michael Landon for the role of “Little Joe” Cartwright of the Bonanza TV show.  But he kept auditioning and won a co-starring role of Jess Harper on the TV Western, Laramie. It ran from 1959 to 1963, and Fuller made lots of money and lots of contacts in the movie industry.

Fuller, Robert - on TV show Laramie -- 2

Fuller appeared in numerous TV Westerns and movies after that. However, his next really successful and lucrative deal was a non-Western. Actor (remember “Dragnet”) and director Jack Webb pestered him until Fuller accepted a co-starring role in NBC’s “Emergency!,” a modern, fast-paced TV medical drama. He got the role of Dr. Kelly Brackett, Chief of Emergency Medicine at the fictitious Rampart General Hospital. And his co-star was the lovely, talented pop singer and actress Julie London, who was the ex-wife of director Jack Webb. She was Nurse Dixie McCall. That show ran for five years, from 1972 to 1977. Long retired, Robert Fuller lives in north Texas. 

2017--07--17 04 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

2017--07--17 03 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

This is the latest piece of business equipment (i.e., toy) purchased and painted and decaled by our son, Stan Paregien Jr. Are you ready for this? He also has an honest-to-Batman “batmobile” with a fake jet exhaust, a fully decorated “General Lee” as seen on Dukes of Hazard” TV show, an authentic DeLorean car with all of the “Back to the Future” gizmos inside and out a little VW all decked out as a Disney studio “love bug” with the number 53 on it. Yep. He is actually making a little money along the way by being paid by folks who want him to bring one of ’em to their corporate event, party, TV commercial and/or movie set. Not bad work if you can get it.

Well, folks, it is now 8:10 in the evening and I’ve been at this way too long. I had hoped to include more, but . . . I am plum tuckered out.

See ya next time.

— Stan

 

 

 

 

Issue 355 – What Does July 4th Mean?

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paregienjournal.com     –     Issue 355     –     June 29, 2017

Well, home owners in Manatee County are doing quite well, thank you. In May of 2017, the median sales price for an existing single-family home stood at $299,000. Folks, that was a 53 percent increase from the end of 2012. Of course, don’t forget there was a big-time real estate “bust” here from 2008 until early 2012. 

****

There was a fine little story in our local paper this morning. Reporter James A. Jones, Jr., did a little feature on a former Manatee County school educator named Bill O’Brien. Bill spends a lot of his time bowling these days, just as he has for the last 76 years. Hey, if I’m lyin’ I’m dyin’. Okay, technically like everyone else, I’m dying bit by bit. But I’m not lyin’. 

You see, Bill O’Brien is now 93 years old. He was first the principal of Prine Elementary, then of Pine View Elementary and then of Parrish Elementary School. A pretty darned good athlete himself in college, after World War II (he was wounded), 31 years ago he started presenting to Manatee County’s top cross country runners each year the “Bill O’Brien Trophy” and he is still doing it. Plus, he set up three endowed scholarship funds to help a few students each year. Bill is a pretty solid citizen, and I’d like to meet him one of these days.

****

Across the Manatee River in Palmetto, several remaining members of the Lincoln Memorial High School – Class of 1967 – met for their 50th reunion. What is really unusual about these people is they were about the last class to graduate from LMHS — an all-black school. There were 131 seniors in their class, but 42 have died. 

****

It has been quite a spell, but at 9:30 a.m. on  Thursday, June 22nd, I met friends Romolo (aka “Rom,” “Ron,” and “Youse guy”) Colella and Don (“The Poetry Machine”) Betts for a late breakfast at Leon’s House of Omelets in the shopping center just west of I-75 and on the south side of Highway 70 (53rd Avenue). We had some coffee and came up with solutions for most of the problems in the United States. Then after breakfast, we developed plans for solving Europe’s difficulties. Next time we’ll work on the energy crisis, I guess. Just routine stuff for old geezers. So if any of you want to join us, give me a call to make sure we’ll be there next time and not at our respective doctor appointments. Ah, yes, the “Golden Years of Life.” Between the three of us, we might have an ounce of gold and everybody is after it. Even if they have to pull it from our teeth.

****

Many may not be aware of the fact that the home headquarters and training center for Goodwill Industries is only a mile or so east of our hacienda. Those folks certainly do a lot of good for many disabled people, with training and jobs and such. Still, because the CEO at Goodwill makes a lot more money than the CEOs of any other similar charities, we prefer to make donations to the Salvation Army. And there are a couple of other Goodwill policies which bug me. They are skilled marketers, of course, taking donated items and marking them up as far as the market will allow. And around here they have donation centers about as common as McDonald’s.

In Manatee County and next-door Sarasota County they have established four stand-alone stores specializing in music and books, and these are very well-organized. But, simultaneously, they have junked the book departments in their regular stores. Once they, too, had books well-organized by topics. No more. In our regular stores, they are heaped together and making it a headache to wade through the mess. Oh, and one other thing I’ve noticed (which other thrift stores have started doing) is that on men’s shirts, for example, they still place price tags and sizes on the individual shirts . . . but then they throw them on the shirt racks with no size organization at all. I don’t get it, don’t like it and won’t shop at the regular stores for clothes or books. Very poor customer service, but easier for them, I guess. 

****

Our daughter, Mrs. John (Stacy) Magness, flew in from Houston on June 13th and left on June 20th. So we got to spend a lot of quality time with her. Of course, we had to work around those pesky afternoon thunderstorms and downpours virtually every day she was here. Still got to take her to both Manatee Beach (our preferred swimmin’ hole, with life guards and a cafe with mmmm, mmmm good pancakes each morning) and to Siesta Beach. Oh, and on her first afternoon, we took her to Clearwater Beach up in nearby Clearwater, Florida. So she got to see Florida’s most award-winning beaches. 

2017--06--13 03 - Clearwater, FL - Peggy and Stacy at CLEARWATER BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 03 - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH -Stacy P Magness by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 08B - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 10A - Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--14 10B - Bradenton, FL - Stan Paregien - by Stacy Magness

2017--06--14 11 - Bradenton, FL - Stacy P Magness - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--15 12 - Sarasota, FL - luncheon cruises - by Stan Paregien

We took a very nice luncheon cruise around Sarasota Bay one day. We got to see a couple of dolphin, plus many of the multi-million dollar mansions fronting the bay. 

2017--06--17 02 - Sarasota, FL - - Stacy P Magness

2017--06--17 04 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - panorama by S Magness

2017--06--17 07 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - Stacy Magness - by Peg Paregien

Peggy took Stacy down to the fabulous Ringling Mansion, Circus Museum and Art Museum in nearby Sarasota on June 17th. They spent the entire day there and had a great time. 

****

Surely this is not a sign of my memory failing or my advancing years, but . . . in the “Birthdays On This Date” section of our local rag for June 23rd I saw where Clarence Thomas– you know — a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Yep, I recognized him . . . but the long list of “younger” musicians, writers, singers, and actors meant nothing to me. Hmmm.

Rogers, Will and Wiley Post -- one of last photos before deaths on Aug 15, 1935

Will Rogers (top, left) & pilot Wiley Post

And in the longer “Today in History” column I only paid much attention to this note: “In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.” Now Wiley Post, who had a wild hair or two as a teenager in Oklahoma, lost an eye when injured on an oil drilling rig in Oklahoma. So he used the insurance settlement to pay for flying lessons and with the rest he bought his very first airplane.

I read a fine biography of Post a few years back,and the author pointed out all of his successes in flying and in inventing high-altitude equipment for pilots. Because of his many ’round-the-world flights and publicity, it is true that when he and his close friend–movie and stage star Will Rogers–died in Alaska in a plane crash (flown by Post) on August 15, 1935, it was Wiley Post who was far better known outside of the United States. I have been to Rogers’ beautiful grave site and museum in Claremore, Oklahoma as well as to Post’s well-marked burial place in far north central Oklahoma City. Each man was exceptional in his own field of expertise.

****

“Paregien’s Bed & Breakfast & More” will be back in operation soon. We are expecting two of our Rwandan friends to visit us in early to mid-August. Then our son and his wife (Stan Jr. & Becky) and their son and his wife (Daniel and Leah) will be with us, from the St. Louis area, from about August 24th to Sept. 4th. We’re polishing up the horseshoe equipment and the shuffleboard stuff to keep them from getting bored here in Paradise.

****

Peggy and I watched another old movie the other night (the only kind our grandkids swear we watch, but there are a few things they don’t know). Anyway this U.S. Cavalry vs. Indians movie was titled “The Oregon Passage.” It was actually filmed in a forest over not far from Bend, Oregon. It was in color and starred a good-lookin’ dude named John Erickson, whom I had never seen before so I guess he went back to being a lifeguard or selling used cars. I noticed as they rolled the credits that the film script was actually based on a Western novel by someone we knew: Gordon D. Shirreffs.

I first met Gordon D. Shirreffs in about 1984, as I recall, at the annual convention of the members of the Western Writers of America. It was held that summer in Branson, Missouri and hosted by Jory Sherman and his wife, Charlotte. The first person I met as I entered the hotel lobby was one of my writing heroes, from the really old crowd, Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson. He and I really hit it off, especially after we found out we had each known Harry Leichler (?), the grocer and honorary mayor of the little town of Piru, Calif., where I lived with my family my last three years of high school.

Anyway, over the next few years, we would get to visit with Gordon Shirreffs and his wife Alice, who were residents of Granada Hills, Calif. at the time. At least one day of each convention was taken up with a bus trip excursion somewhere not far away. Those were always great times to visit with big-league writing pros Like Tommy, Gordon and Jory, as well as other would-be-Louis-L’Amour like myself.  

Well, the host of Turner Classic Movies that night wrapped up the showing of the rather forgettable film with a funny story about Gordon Shirreffs. In 1957 he had written a Western novel titled “Rio Bravo.” John Wayne didn’t care much for the actual book, but he loved the title and wanted it for his next movie. So he and/or his Batjack production company paid Gordon some darned good money for the book, with the agreement that Gordon could sell the actual story to anybody else but not the title. So John Wayne got the title he wanted and Gordon got the money he wanted, . . . not once but twice, as the second buyer turned it into “The Oregon Passage.” And he would laugh as he told that true story and add, “That was by far the most money I ever earned for just selling two words (“Rio Bravo”). 

Gordon Shirreffs had been born in Chicago, Ill., on Jan. 15, 1914. His mother was a recent immigrant from Scotland, and he himself sometimes played in bagpipe bands in southern California. During his lifetime he wrote some 79 novels, much in the solid historical style of Louis L’Amour, and hundreds of short stores and a bunch of stories for comic book companies. He was still living in Granada Hills when he died on Feb. 9, 1996 at the age of 82.

2016--03--17 Food -- Florida -- The Recipe Box Eatery

Above is the business card for a really nice, fairly small “mom and pop” restaurant just north of the McDonald’s near 53rd Avenue East (Highway 70) and 33rd St. East. Give ’em a try.

We ran out of TV trays for everyone at our house the other night, but luckily we had a spare out in the shed. I think this guy is saying, “Very nice!” or something like that.

Senior Citizen TV Tray

 

A Crumbled Dream

by Gene Shelburne

Amarillo, Texas

Campbell, Alexander -- liknesses -- 04 at age 65

 

Does the name Alexander Campbell mean anything to you? If you grew up in any kind of Church of Christ or Christian Church, you need to know about him. He was the founder of our American denomination.

Let me confess that, although I did grow up in such a church, I knew little about the man until I was invited to join a host of church leaders at his home in Bethany, West Virginia—way back in 1966— to mark the one hundredth anniversary of Mr. Campbell’s death.

 During that memorable week I learned that Alexander Campbell did more than found churches. In the college he built, he educated the sons of U.S. presidents. Few people noticed when Campbell boosted American wool trade by importing new breeds of sheep. Nor were many folks impressed when he was elected to West Virginia’s legislature. But his star was slowly rising.

Even founding hundreds of congregations across our young, growing country didn’t catapult Campbell to fame. He became a household name after debating—while befriending—the famous atheist Robert Owen. At his prime, this school-founding, sheep-raising, church-planting country parson was invited to address the combined houses of the U.S. Congress. In many ways he had become the Billy Graham of his day.

During that 1966 gathering in Bethany, however, we also focused on the Civil War years right before Campbell’s death. The halls of Bethany College were quiet—almost deserted—while that brutal war was raging not far away. Most of the students were on the battle lines. Campbell’s heart was broken. His own family was split, with favorite nephews wearing uniforms both blue and gray. Still worse, from his view, Christian brothers from churches he had planted and nurtured now were slaughtering each other.

Civil War -- up-close fighting between Union and Rebel troops -- 02

The young nation that Campbell had mistaken for the eve of Christ’s thousand-year reign had morphed into a hell on earth. Campbell’s dream had become a nightmare.

As Will Durant would later write: “From barbarism to civilization requires a century; from civilization to barbarism needs but a day.” Campbell saw barbarism in his final days, and it made him mourn.

With July 4th just ahead, I rehearse this sad but true story to remind us that the peace and freedom and prosperity we cherish can dissolve over night into blood and hate and tears. It did once. It can again.

Logo for Gene Shelburne - 2017

July4th--05 Flag with 4th of July

Do your children and/or grandchildren understand this day?

Best wishes until next time,

Stan

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Issue 353    –     March 17, 2017

Horsin’ Around in Florida

Retired folks in Florida just don’t have many empty days on their calendars. First of all, there are all those coffee hours, bingo games and shuffleboard games that beckon every week. Then there are all those Yankees who come down from up North to visit “during the season.” And then, if that were not enough to keep one busy, there is a lot of just plain ol’ horsin’ around on my agenda. 

For example, we dearly love all of the beautiful beaches here on the Gulf side of Florida. Some of the best anywhere are from Clearwater to our north and down to Venice on our south. But undoubtedly, the first choice for a broad, pearly white beach and beautiful water the prize goes to Siesta Beach on the west edge of Sarasota. That’s about 20 miles from our house. So . . . hi-ho, hi-ho . . . it’s off to the beach we go. 

2017--02--23 07 Siesta Beach - No 1 in US, No 5 in World

Ralph Iacovacci (“The Italian Stallion,” so named because he liked to put in a quarter and ride those horses outside Walmart) and his wife Eunice told us about a “Night of Nashville Music” program put on by their church. So Peggy and I saddled up and joined the fun.

2017--02--25 01 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 02 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 03 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

Now about that “Best Western Outfit” contest mentioned below in the program, . . . well, shazam . . . I won the doggoned thing. Got a new Dodge Ram pickup truck, too. Hey, I can dream can’t I? The real prize was dinner for two at a local restaurant. That was close enough to satisfy me.

2017--02--25 04 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 05A Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 05B Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 07 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

“Hey, babe, ya wanna fool around . . . er, I mean pucker up??”

2017--02--25 06 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

2017--02--25 08 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

2017--02--25 09 Bradenton, FL - Stan Paregien's boots and spurs

And next . . . . 

2017--03--02 01 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 03 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 04 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 05 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 06 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 07 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 08 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 09 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 10 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 11 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 13 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 14 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

And then an afternoon spent in Sarasota looking at old (i.e., classic) cars. And we returned that evening for a very good singer (Jimmy Mezz) doing “A Tribute to Music of the 1950’s.” 

2017--03--03 06 Sarasota, FL - P Paregien, G and James Cotton - Classic Cars - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--03 05 Sarasota, FL - James Cotton at Classic Cars - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--05 01A Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

2017--03--05 01C Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

2017--03--05 03 Palmetto, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien - by G Cotton

2017--03--07 01 Bradenton, FL - James and Glenda Cotton

2017--03--07 02 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien and Allie - by Stan Paregien

And next, . . . we and our neighbors/friends Michael and Penny Letichevsky went over to Aracadia, Florida (about 1 hour southeast of us) on March 11th to enjoy the 89th Annual Arcadia Rodeo. We all enjoyed the cowboy and cowgirl action. They’re even supposed to have a brand-new arena ready for next year’s event.

2017--03--11 01 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien
2017--03--11 02 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 03 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 04 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 05 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 06 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 07 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

That clown is being just a little too nosey, if you catch my drift. 

2017--03--11 08 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 09 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 10 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 11 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 12 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 12B Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 13 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 14 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 15 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16A Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16B Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16C Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16D Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17A Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17B Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17C Arcadia, FL - Penny Letichevsky - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17D Arcadia, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17D1 Arcadia, FL - Stan Paregien

And here’s the old cowboy himself.

2017--03--11 17E Arcadia, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 19 Arcadia, FL - Clydesdale - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 20 Arcadia, FL - Penny Letichevsky with Clydesdale - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 21 Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky with portapotties - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 22 Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky with portapotties - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 23 Arcadia, FL - bull - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 24 Arcadia, FL - bull - by Stan Paregien

Well, as you can clearly see, we have been doing a lot of horsin’ around here in Florida. So you might just as well come on down and join the fun.

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Issue 349 – Don Betts, A Good Man

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Issue 349  –  February 21, 2017

Don Betts: A Good Man

We were fortunate in meeting Don and Judy Betts the first couple of weeks after we moved to Florida in June of 2013. At the recommendation of Mrs. Richard (Rita) Edwards, whom we met a couple of years before that in our home church in Edmond, Okla., we visited the Central Church of Christ on the east side of Sarasota. And we were met and cheerfully, warmly welcomed by Don and Judy. And they weren’t the only ones. Soon we decided that would be our church home.

Since that time, Don and Judy Betts have been helpful any time we needed information or encouragement. The four of us have been with each other through a variety of health problems and personal ups and downs. We have studied the Bible together, prayed together, worshiped together, eaten many a meal together, gone on day trips together and shared in several music and poetry jams. In addition, at their kind invitation we spent a whole week with them in a condo on a golf course in stunningly beautiful Sedona, Arizona. You get to know people pretty doggoned well when you spend that much time with them. So now we can share the not-so-secret news: Don and Judy Betts are solid citizens, first-class people and dedicated Christians.

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Last Saturday night, Feb. 18, 2017, we went to a birthday part in Bradenton to help Don celebrate his 85th year on mother earth. Judy worked herself to a nub organizing and executing this wonderful event. I’m guessing that some 50 invited guests showed up for a meal, a piece of his birthday cake, and a program where each person had a chance to say something personal to Don. It was a night of gracious words of encouragement and remembrance. Don read a poem, as did his son Tom Betts, and so did I. Here is mine:

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2017-02-18-07-bradenton-fl-sue-adams-by-stan-paregien

2017-02-18-08-bradenton-fl-don-betts-pat-and-sybil-hardeman-by-stan-paregien

Dr. Pat Hardeman, Ph.D., is a long-time friend of Don and Judy. He earned a doctorate in philosophy and religion from the University of Illinois. In the 1950s he was much in demand as an evangelist and a debater. He then became a professor of religion and philosophy at Florida Christian College (now Florida College) in the Temple Terrace area of Tampa. At the same time, he was a part-time professor at the University of Tampa. He was also a noted and outspoken leader in the Civil Rights movement throughout the state of Florida. He also preached for a time at what today is the Central Church of Christ in Sarasota. Later, he had a highly successful career as a realtor. He was even selected as the President of the Florida Realtor’s Association.

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2017-02-18-09b-bradenton-fl-t-anderson-s-and-pat-hardeman-by-stan-paregien

2017-02-18-09c-bradenton-fl-bev-and-dave-lane-by-stan-paregien

2017-02-18-09e-bradenton-fl-rod-myers-pat-hardeman-by-stan-paregien

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2017-02-18-09g-bradenton-fl-sybil-hardeman-by-stan-paregien

2017-02-18-10-bradenton-fl-spencer-and-quentin-waid-by-peg-paregien

And now . . . the “Good Ol’ Days of Yore” . . . 

 

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Before there was a bridge across Sarasota Bay to Longboat Key (island), George Betts would row his small boat across the bay to the John Ringling Estate in Sarasota to work as their chief horticulturist. He became familiar with not only all of the Ringling Brothers and their families but with the workers and performers who were employed by the Ringling Brothers & Barnum and Bailey Circus.

It was there on the far south side of Longboat Key that George and Mary Betts lived as their family grew. Don Betts came along on Feb. 9, 1932. Most of his childhood was spent roaming through the woods and jungles and swamps on Longboat Key. He still enjoys telling about swimming on the Gulf side and seeing a myriad variety of fish in every wave. What kid would not have liked playing “Tarzan” on his own virtual paradise. He and his sibling could play in the dirt road which ran the length of the island without a car passing through for hours at a time. NOTE: Don’t try that today, especially “during the season.” 

During the course of his life, Don worked for several years as a lineman for Florida Light & Power after he came back from his tour of duty with the U.S. Navy. Then he worked as a Game Ranger out at Myakka State Park. He transitioned from that to serving as a policeman way out in Tucson, Arizona. Later, he worked in a bank in Sarasota and then became an independent insurance agent.

Don and Judy have lived in a lovely home on the golf course at Tara Preserve, in Bradenton, Florida for several years now. 

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2017-02-18-14-bradenton-fl-don-betts

2017-02-18-12-don-betts-as-a-farmer

2017-02-18-11a-don-betts-in-navy

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2017-02-18-15-bradenton-fl-don-and-judy-betts

2017-02-18-17-don-and-judy-betts-in-hawaii

Well, that’s just a tiny bit of the story of our friend Don Betts.

The late Louis L’Amour, the best-selling Western novelist of his day, often had a character in his book say about another cowboy: “He would do to ride the river with.” In other words, that man could be trusted to ride for the brand and to do what was right. In this case I’ll just say: You are an awful good man, Don Betts. And we are proud to share part of your life.

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Issue 346 – Laughter Therapy

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Issue 346     —     January 9, 2017

Whenever I am able to laugh in the middle of a problem, it always makes me feel like I can get through the ordeal someway, somehow. Isn’t that the way it is for you?

Laughter is simply a poor person’s psychiatric therapy, and it may even be more therapeutic in many cases than the high-dollar stuff. Hey, in another life (i.e., many years ago), I worked for the Texas Department of Mental Heath as the Director of one of their centers. And I was a full-time preacher for over ten years. So I have seen people in a world of hurt in many contexts. And spirits were always lifted when we were able to laugh together. 

It was the legendary English author Charles Dickens (A CHRISTMAS CAROL) who wrote, “There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.” And the late actress Audrey Hepburn said, “I love people who make me laugh. I honestly think it’s the thing I like most, to laugh. It cures a multitude of ills. It’s probably the most important thing in a person.”

I don’t know if Vladimir Putin, the despotic ruler of Russia, ever laughs. But here is what Russian writer and philosopher Fyodor Dostoyevsky had to say on the subject:  “If you wish to glimpse inside a human soul and get to know a man, don’t bother analyzing his ways of being silent, of talking, of weeping, of seeing how much he is moved by noble ideas; you will get better results if you just watch him laugh. If he laughs well, he’s a good man.” 

Then there is this rather practical point of view from an apparent religious guru, Swami Satchidonanda, in his book THE YOGA SUTRAS: “We are not going to change the whole world, but we can change ourselves and feel free as birds. We can be serene even in the midst of calamities and, by our serenity, make others more tranquil. Serenity is contagious. If we smile at someone, he or she will smile back. And a smile costs nothing. We should plague everyone with joy. If we are to die in a minute, why not die happily, laughing?” 

So in this issue I have focused on cartoons and essays that give you a chance to exercise your smiler — i.e., the muscles that cooperate to produce a big ol’ smile when you laugh about something.

So sit back and relax. Take this opportunity to laugh on the inside, and then — what the heck — let it fly. Laugh out loud and enjoy it. 

Let’s get started.

 

 

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Poem 420   Prayer and a Professional Man -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien - 2015--11--10

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Poem 422   Cowboy's Memory Problem, A   -  copyrighted 2015--11--24 by Stan Paregien -- Page 1 of 2

Poem 422   Cowboy's Memory Problem, A   -  copyrighted 2015--11--24 by Stan Paregien -- Page 2 of 2

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In Observation of Tolerance

by Jiggs McDonald

(Mr. McDonald, a broadcaster in the National Hockey League’s Hall of Fame, made these statements before an audience in Toronto, Canada. Sent to me by a friend in Bakersfield, Calif., a town with a high threshold for tolerance. After all, they let Buck Owens & His Buckeroos live there for decades.)

I am truly perplexed that so many of my friends are against another mosque being built in Toronto. I think it should be the goal of every Canadian to be tolerant regardless of their religious beliefs. Thus the mosque should be allowed, in an effort to promote tolerance.

That is why I also propose that two nightclubs be opened next door to the mosque; thereby promoting tolerance from within the mosque. We could call one of the clubs, which would be gay, “The Turban Cowboy,” and the other, a topless bar, would be called “You Mecca Me Hot.”

Next door should be a butcher shop that specializes in pork, and adjacent to that an open-pit barbecue pork restaurant, called “Iraq of Ribs.”

Across the street there could be a lingerie store called “Victoria Keeps Nothing Secret,” with sexy mannequins in the window modeling the goods”, and on the other side a liquor store called “Morehammered.”

All of this would encourage Muslims to demonstrate the tolerance they demand of us.

[Someone else added this footnote: Yes we should promote tolerance, and you can do your part by passing this on. And if you are not laughing or smiling at this point . . . , it is either past your bedtime, . . . or its midnight at the oasis and time to put your camel to bed.]

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Poem 432-- Just Following Instructions   --  copyrighted by Stan Paregien Sr - 2016-01-23  -- Page 1 of 2

Poem 432-- Just Following Instructions   --  copyrighted by Stan Paregien Sr - 2016-01-23  -- Page 2 of 2

 

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Poem 440   A Solution for Marital Problems  -  by Stan Paregien Sr - Copyrighted April 15, 2016

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Vice-President Pence & President Donald Trump

doing a celebratory dance at their inauguration.

[Aw, relax. I’m a Republican . . . with a sense of humor.]

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See there, now don’t you feel better? I sure do hope so.

Best wishes,

Stan

RESOURCES FOR YOU:

Briar, Jeffrey.  The Laughter Yoga Book: Laugh Yourself to Better Health.

F., ED.  God Grant Me the Laughter: A Treasury of Twelve Step Humor.

Goodheart, Annette.  Laughter Therapy: How to Laugh About Everything in Your Life That Isn’t Really Funny. King, Brian.  The Laughing Cure: Emotional and Physical Healing: A Comedian Reveals Why Laughter Really Is the Best Medicine.

Laughter the Best Medicine: A Laugh-Out-Loud Collection of our Funniest Jokes, Quotes, Stories & Cartoons(Reader’s Digest): Editors of Reader’s Digest

Lloyd, Jessica.  Laugh Your Way to Enlightenment: The Art of Spiritual Laughter

Martin, James.  Between Heaven and Mirth: Why Joy, Humor, and Laughter Are at the Heart of the Spiritual Life.

McCloud, Ace.  Laughter Therapy: Discover How to Use Laughter and Humor for Healing, Stress Relief, Improved Health and Increased Emotional Wellbeing.

Peter, Laurence.  The Laughter Prescription. 

Pierce, Chonda.  Laughing in the Dark: A Comedian’s Journey through Depression. 

Trueblood, Elton. The Humor of Christ.

 

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Issue 344 – Adios 2016, Ola 2017

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Issue 344  –   January 3, 2017  –  Bradenton, Florida

Well, folks, we had quite a nice New Year’s Eve Celebration at our 55+ retirement community down here in Paradise. We ended this 31st day of December, 2016 basking in the sunshine of an 82 degree day. And then we gathered in our clubhouse for a catered dinner, followed by a dance. Pretty doggoned nice, we thought.

Peggy and I stuck around the festivities until about 10:00 pm. We home and started watching an old black-and-white movie about 10:30 p.m. The next thing I knew I woke up and the clock above our TV said 12:09. Peggy had fallen asleep, too. So I awoke her to tell her “Happy New Year!” And then we saundered off to bed. The best part of the day was this part, when I thanked God for being able to start another year with the love of my life.

One of the members of our Home Owners Association had asked me to take photos of our folks as they came through the door for the New Year’s Eve Party. So Peggy took down their names as they lined up and I took two shots of each group or individual. All of the 65+ pictures turned out well, except for four or five, and I appologize for that. I can blame those few  photos on my camera, not the camera operator. For, as you will see, the photo which someone else snapped of Peggy and me with my camera was one of those which was a bit off. Well, at least the price was right (i.e., free). 

I have posted below most of the photos that I took that evening. I hope you enjoy them. 

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That’s about it for now. My best wishes to each and every one of you for a wonderful year of 2017.

— Stan Paregien

 

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Flitting Around the USA

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Issue 341  — October 17, 2016

During the last part of August, my wife Peggy flew to Washington, D.C. She went there to be with her sister, Paula Allen King, who was accompanying her daughter and granddaughter on a trip from Oregon to get the granddaughter enrolled and housed as she was beginning her freshman year at George Washington University. Pretty heady stuff to be living right where some of the most important events in our nation have taken place.

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Peggy Allen Paregien in front of the White House. No, the Obamas did not invite her in for an afternoon tea. Oh, well. 

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Paula Allen King stands with her back toward the White House.

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On Monday, Sept. 12th, Peggy and I kicked around Indianapolis on our own. We started by visiting the Indiana State Capital building. That may sound easy enough, but we were a bit overwhelmed by the very limited street-side parking and the one-way streets and the system (or lack of it) for parking underground near the capital grounds. 

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We decided we’d stop by the Governor’s office for some free coffee and cookies. No such thing. And we found out that Governor Pence must not have gotten our email about us stopping by for a chat, because he ran all the way out of state to hang out with some ol’ billionaire named Frump . . . or Plump . . . or . . . , oh, yeah, Trump. 

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Well, already getting foot-sore, it was upward and onward to the home of President Benjamin Harrison. Heck, he wasn’t home, either. But he had a solid excuse.

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Well, there you have it, neighbors. That concludes the first part of our trip to Indiana. In future issues we’ll show you our brush with General Lew Wallace, the author of BEN HUR. And we’ll visit Springfield, Illinois and Abraham Lincoln’s home and his burial monument.

Plus, in tiny Mount Olive, Illinois we’ll visit the “Union Miners Cemetery” and the grave of the beloved (and hated) union labor leader Mother Jones. And we’ll take you with us to the wedding in St. Louis of our grandson Daniel Paregien and his lovely bride, Leah Cromer.Then, we’ll mosey on down to beautiful Lake Lure, North Carolina for a few relaxing days before heading north with my Hillbilly Cousin to far northeast Tennessee . . . where they love barbeque and storytelling. All of that and more in future issues. So y’all come on back real soon, ya hear?