Category Archives: Missouri

Issue 377 – Time Changes Pert Near Everything

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Issue 377          Sept. 29, 2018           An Occasional Blog  

Time Changes Pert Near Everything

The great western crooner, Tommy Duncan, sang a song during the 1940s titled “Time Changes Everything.” It is a ballad about lost love, that he thought she would always love him. But over time, that changed. Then he thought he would never get over, but . . . shazam . . . time changed that. Finally, he wishes her well as he rides off in the sunset with his new love. Change, change, change.

Well, there’s a lot of truth in that ol’ Bob Wills western swing ballad.  But to state it a little more accurately and in the words of my unhousebroken cousin Bubba, “Time changes pert near everything.”

For example, you graduate from high school and your class fractures into minute pieces. Some kids go off to college or off to the military or off elsewhere for a job  . . . and a few just, well, go off. One day you realize not even Humpty Dumpty can’t put those pieces back together. 

Or you reach that mid-life crisis point where you must face up to the fact that you’re never going to be President of the United States. Heck, you’re not even going to be a leader in your Lions Club or your church. Last week you got a letter confirming your rich uncle left you his favorite poodle, but nothing else. And chances are high you aren’t going to see your own children reach any high level of success. And you’ve just about concluded you just ain’t very good lookin’ no mo. 

Shoot-fire, y’all, it gets worse. You become a senior citizen somewhere about 60 or 65. That’s when you notice the wheels starting to fall off your wagon, and you never were very mechanically inclined. You sorta think you’re a cut above most old folks, . . . until you count the number of prescription pills you take each day. And you tally up the aches and pains and dysfunctional parts of your anatomy and realize that if a part of you doesn’t hurt, it is probably not working.

Yep, time changes . . . pert near every aspect of our lives.

That’s what I’m talking about, friends, the changes that will not be ignored. They trip us on our way to the bathroom and slap us up side of the head to get our attention.

Okay, fellow travelers, I freely confess I kinda feel like I have the Elephant-of-Change sitting on my chest. Maybe if I scratch its back that Dumbo will go squat somewhere else, but he is probably like my nutty brother-in-law, Alex. He will be back much more often than I’d like.

CHANGE 1

Well, here is the first of several changes I am making: I will no longer give public performances of my storytelling (i.e., cowboy poetry, stories, songs and guitar playing). That tough decision comes after having had a heap of fun doing those things since about 1991 — about 27 years worth. In that regard, here is a poem I performed on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018 during my very last session at the National Cowboy Symposium & Celebration in Lubbock, Texas. I call this poem, my 488th, “On Hitting a Wall at 77.”

Poem 488 - On Hitting a Wall at 77 - by Stan Paregien - July 20, 2018 Page 1 of 2

Poem 488 - On Hitting a Wall at 77 - by Stan Paregien - July 20, 2018 Page 2 of 2

2018--09--06 01 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium

 

2018--09--06 05 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium2018--09--06 06 Lubbock, TX - National Cowboy Symposium

2018--09--07 05 Lubbock, TX - - National Cowboy Symp - LeRoy & Sandra Jones - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--07 09 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Stan & Peggy Paregien with Sandra & LeRoy Jones

2018--09--07 13 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Janice Deardorff performing - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 02--C Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Stan Paregien - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--08 02--E Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Robert Beene - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--08 03 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Joel Nelson - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 05 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Chris Isaacs - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--08 06 Lubbock, TX - - NCS - Pipp Gillette - by Stan Paregien

2018--09--09 03 Lubbock, TX - - Stan Paregien & Perry Williams - by Peggy Paregien

2018--09--09 08 Lubbock, TX - - National Cowboy Symposium

CHANGE 2

My second change is this: I’m am saying adios and farewell to all my social media.

Yes, Virginia, ’tis true. I shut down — i.e., deleted — my Facebook account just last week. Oh, yeah, I’ll miss seeing some photos of our kids and grandkids and great-grandkids that somehow never get seen to us in any other way. And I’ll miss that good clean joke which crossed my screen every once in a while, but life goes on. And so do I.

Oh, I guess I should mention those somewhere over 300 folks who friended me on Facebook. Some of those folks are really good friends, with a few of them dating back from six or more decades ago. Those I’ll miss a bunch, but . . . I still have a telephone (yes, a smarter-than-me phone and a land-line) and the U.S. Post Office still delivers to my mailbox (though 90 % of which I get is non-personal) . . . so I can be reached. Now I admit to being blissfully unaware of just how 40 or so of my “Friends” on Facebook had any real connection with me. Too much drama. Too much trivia. Just . . . way too much.

CHANGES THAT REALLY HURT

Part of the big changes I’m seeing in my life have to do with the passing of close friends and relatives . . . and the demise of so many people who, though not close friends, were folks I knew at one time or have corresponded with for a while or  people for whom I had a long-distance and long-standing admiration.

In this blog I just want to mention some of our friends we always saw at the National Cowboy Symposium and elsewhere, but who have crossed over that Big Divide. Here is just part of that list:

**********  DUSTY & PAT RICHARDS

 

 

The first time I met Ronald Lee (“Dusty”) Richards was in 1984 in Branson, Missouri. A few weeks earlier I had met Jory Sherman at a writers convention in Oklahoma City. It was Jory who told me all about the great folks in the Western Writers of America and about that year’s convention in a short time in Branson. At his urging, I traveled there alone and walked into the host hotel’s lobby. There an elderly man looked at my cowboy hat, walked over to me and introduced himself to me. It was none other than Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson, the author of numerous Western articles and novels and movie and TV scripts. 

A short time later I met a fledgling writer from Springdale named Dusty Richards, and we hit it off right away. Between the WWA, other writer conventions and the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock,  Peggy and I saw Dusty and Pat many, many times over the years. He was a “late bloomer” who did not have his first book published until 1992, when he was 55 years old. But, golly Bill, he caught on fire there. He wrote some 150 western novels, many under various publishing “house names.” One of those novels, The Mustanger & the Lady, was made into a movie with the title, “Painted Woman.”

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Paul Patterson was the high school literature teacher who became a mentor out in West Texas to none other than the late, great Western novelist Elmer Kelton. 

2002-051-- Lubbock, TX -- Pat and Dusty Richards - National Cowboy Symposium

Those times are now behind us, wonderful memories we will cherish. Dusty and Pat Richards were in a horrific car accident in December of 2017. They were hospitalized in critical condition. Pat died from her injuries on Jan. 11, 2018 and Dusty left this life one week later on Jan. 18, 2018. He was 80 years old.

Dusty and Pat loved their adopted home state of Arkansas, as well as Arizona and the great Southwest. A writer for the family posted this on Dusty’s Facebook page:

“What can we say about Dusty? The real question is what can’t we say about him? To say that he was larger than life is the grandest of understatements. He was an irresistible force and an unmovable object all rolled into one, a personality wider than the western skies he wrote about. He was an eternal optimist, a man who woke up each and every day renewed and ready for the next job, the next challenge, the next good fight. He was a father, a patriarch, a mentor of the first order.

“He toured the  country teaching and encouraging new and experienced writers alike, challenging them to follow his lead, tell the next inspiring story, pen the next Great American Novel. He was a fighter, a lover, a joker, an entrepreneur, a canny businessman, a television and radio personality, a famous rodeo announcer, a cowboy, and, perhaps above all else, a master storyteller. Dusty was everything that fit under his trademark ten-gallon hat and so much more, and we could keep writing for a year and not do him justice.”

**********  HENRY TORRES

Torres, Henry - died at age 80 in a hospital in Rio Rancho, NM

**  Henry Torres, a rancher and historian and cowboy poet, died on April 6, 2018 at the age of 80. He was born to Hispanic parents on Nov. 7, 1937. He grew up in that farming and ranching family, with most of his time spent on ranches in New Mexico — from Deming to Las Cruces and up to Silver City.  He had two beloved sisters, Beatrice and Elsie, where were some older than he. Henry joined the U.S. Navy right after graduating from high school, but came back in 1960 to again work for and with his father. 

This cowpoke went above his learnin’ and married Carolyn Shores in 1971. Henry spent much of his adult career ranching on the side and working as a Brand Inspector for the New Mexico Livestock Board. He retired as the Supervisor in Silver City in 1996. A few years before his retirement, he got interested in writing and publically performing cowboy poetry. He was of the founders and supporters of the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum in Las Cruces, NM. And he was the primary force behind the creation of their annual “Cowboy Days” celebration.

In 2002, Henry Torres felt very blessed when he received an “American Cowboy Culture” award at the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock, Texas. In 2016, he was recognized in a ceremony at the Las Cruces New Mexico Farm & Ranch Museum for his many years of service to the industry and to the museum. In 2011, Carolyn Torres was seriously sick and wanted to move to Nevada to spend her last days close to their children and grandchildren, and they left their beloved New Mexico. She died in 2014, so Henry moved back to Silver City. He lived and died as a man of his word, a cowboy to the bone.

**********  GUY W. LOGSDON

Peggy and I first met Guy Logsdon in about 1990 at the National Cowboy Symposium in Lubbock, Texas. He had a both at the convention center where he sold new and used and collectable books. When he went back to Tulsa and started “The Oklahoma Cowboy Poetry Gathering” at the National Western Museum & Heritage Center in Oklahoma City. He was kind enough to invite me to perform there several times. Now he is gone.

 Guy William Logsdon was born on May 31, 1934 in Ada, Okla. He grew up there, played bass fiddle and then the guitar, in the Logsdon family band. Then added singing and storytelling to his skills. He graduated from Ada High School and then attended and graduated from East Central State University there is Ada. While getting educated, he also got married to Phyllis Landers from up the road in Okemah (hometown of the legendary singer and songwriter Woody Guthrie).

1991-014 GuyLogsdon-StanP-closeup

 Later, Guy received M.S. degree in Library Science and his Doctorate of Education from the University of Oklahoma. His first job was as Director of Libraries at prestigious University of Tulsa. Over time he became a recognized expert in three very different fields: (1) the life and music of Woody Guthrie; (2) Western swing music and the lives of Bob & Johnnie Lee Wills; and (3) old-time authentic cowboy music. 

Cover----Guy Logsdon--800 px

Dr. Logsdon wrote the liner notes for both Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger compilation CDs which were produced by Smithsonian Folkways. His books include “The University of Tulsa: A History, 1882-1972;” “The Whorehouse Bells Were Ringing and Other Songs Cowboys Sing;” “Ada, Oklahoma, Queen City of the Chickasaw Nation: A Pictorial History;” “Saddle Serenaders;” “The Flip of the Coin; the Story of Tommy Allsup;” and  “Woody’s Road; Woody Guthrie’s Letters Home, Drawings, Photos, and Other Unburied Treasures” co-authored with Mary Jo Guthrie Edgmon (Woody’s youngest sister). Guy Logsdon himself was the subject of Stan Paregien’s eBook, “Guy W. Logsdon: Award-winning Folklorist,” and a main source of first-hand information for Stan’s book, “Woody Guthrie: The Man, His Music & His Myth.”

 Guy Logsdon died Feb. 5, 2018 after a short illness. He and Phyllis had been married for 64 years. One of their daughters, Cindy Logsdon Black, is married to and performs with noted cowboy poet and storyteller Baxter Black.

**********  GAIL T. BURTON

Burton, Gail Travis - 1929 to 2017 - cowboy poet in Benton, ARPeggy and I first met Gail T. Burton (Benton, AR) at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Center in Oklahoma City in about 1991. That was when Dr. Guy W. Logsdon of Tulsa organized the very first “Oklahoma Cowboy Poetry Gathering.” He and I each performed there, and we would perform together at many other events over the years. Burton began writing and performing his own cowboy poetry and before he stopped he had created more than 500 poems.  He also wrote a book titled, “Cow Pies and Candle Lights” (1999).

Gail Travis Burton died on Feb. 22, 2017 at his home in Benton, Arkansas at the age of 88. He had been born Jan. 4, 1929 in Temple, OK. Ten months after his birth the United States and much of the world would be floundering the economic disaster we now call “The Great Depression.” Well, Gail grew up and served Uncle Sam as a soldier in the Army and was stationed in Korean from 1946 to 1948. Later, he took specialized training at Oklahoma State University and spent the rest of his life as a Fire Protection Specialist in California and in Arkansas.

g2000-88

Peggy Paregien took this photo at the 1st Annual Oklahoma Poetry Gathering at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Center in Oklahoma City. LEFT TO RIGHT: Okay, here’s where my memory has slipped a cinch. I cannot remember the fellah at the left, seems maybe he was a professor at Oklahoma Panhandle State University way out at Goodwell, Okla. Anybody know his name? That bare-faced gent 2nd from left is , . . . uh . . . give me a second . . . oh, yeah. Me. Stan Paregien. And the lady is Francine Robison, the pride of Tecumseh, OK. And on the far right is Gail T. Burton.

Burton was a deacon at First Baptist Church of Benton. He was also a Master Mason and a member of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. In addition, he was a member of the Missouri Cowboy Poet’s Association, and a charter member of the Academy of Western Artists. He was survived by his wife of 65 years, Barbara Burton and their five  children, 15 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

How Far Is It to Bethlehem?

by Gail T. Burton of Benton, AR

“How far is it to Bethlehem,”
a young cowboy asked his pard’
while riding ‘cross the open range
as the snow was falling hard.
It was coming on to Christmas,
and the two were out alone,
pushing cows to lower pasture
where the blizzard hadn’t blown.

“I know it’s past Chicago,
crosst’ the ocean anyhow;
I still don’t know just where it’s at,
but a far piece I’d allow.”
His partner rode a while in thought,
like he hadn’t even heard.
“It’s a right far piece from Heaven,
you can take me at my word.”

That’s all he said for ‘most an hour,
while they hazed the cattle slow,
but his thoughts were on the Christ child
as they trudged on through the snow.
On the thought of that first Christmas,
and the gift God sent to earth,
of the truth of Jesus’ coming,
and the blessing of His birth.

While riding on he understood
Where these thoughts of Christmas lead,
And bringing words up from his heart
The old cowboy softly said:
“I’ve no clue to mark the distance,
of the mile, ….. I’m at a loss.
How far is it to Bethlehem?
It’s just half way to the cross.”

© 2004, Gail T. Burton

 

I reckon that’s more’n enough rambling for one session. Thank you, sincerely, for stopping by. Adios for now. 

 

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Issue 367 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    –     Issue 367     –     Oct. 27, 2027

 

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3:

1870 to 1902

[Note: Most of the information in this 3-part blog may be found in the research which I did for my self-published book, Paregien Family History: 1816 to 2006. That book, published in 2006 and having some 675 pages, covers the following related groups: Paregien, Paregine, Peargin and Pearigen. — SP]

The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin”, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township and her occupation as “Domestic”. It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township. [RESEARCH NOTE: Did this child belong to Elizabeth Paregien??]

The St. Louis City Directory (which only lists the head of the household) for 1870-71 lists J.M. Paregien, “carpenter and builder,” with a business at 310 N. 7th St. and his residence at 1417 Cass Avenue. In December of 2004, Stan Paregien, Sr., tried to visit these spots. The business address is now part of a large area where the football stadium where the former St. Louis Rams team stands. And the residential address, close to the downtown area, is a vacant lot.

2004-104 St Louis, MO - Stan Paregien at the place where Jacob Paregien lived after 1865

Stan Paregien, Sr. in 2004 in front of 1417 Cass Ave., in St. Louis. The vacant lot to the left of this building was both the residence and business address for Jacob M. Paregien back in 1870. [Photo 2004-104]

The St. Louis City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for “J.M. Paregien”

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien)  to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

1874 -- 01 The Eads bridge was dedicated in St Louis on July 4, 1874and still operates in 2017

In 1874, the Eads Bridge, the very first bridge in St. Louis to cross the mighty Mississippi, was dedicated with famous  a famous Civil War soldier, General William T. Sherman presiding. It was Gen. Sherman who took his Union troops on the march across Georgia, destroying most everything in sight. That bridge is still there and in 2016 was carrying about 8,000 vehicles each day between St. Louis, Missouri and East St. Louis, Illinois.

14 Oct, 1874   –   Marriage of Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien) at age 16 to 21 year old Antoine (“Ollie”) Guion in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1874-75 Lists “Jacob Mac Paregien”, a carpenter, living on East Pennsylvania near Neosho St.

The Union Railroad Depot, a magnificent structure, opened at 12th and Poplar Streets. Today the old Depot houses dozens of upscale retail shops and restaurants and is still quite beautiful.

The 1876 directory lists him as “John M. Paregien, builder, Pennsylvania Ave. near Neosho. And it lists Jacob’s son, Samuel, as a laborer who boarded at the same address.

So, the last documentation we have of him living in St. Louis is in 1876.

28 Jan., 1876   –   Death of 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

According to other sources, Holy Trinity was a “poor man’s” Catholic Cemetery where mainly German and some Irish immigrants from north St. Louis were buried. In 1878 it was called “New Bremen Cemetery”. And in 1909 city fathers decided to use that land to create O’Fallon Park and they ordered the graves to be moved to Calvary Cemetery at 5239 W. Florissant (Calvary Cemetery Association, 5239 W. Florissant, St. Louis, MO 63115    Phone 381-1313). In July of 2005, I went there and they checked their computer and had no record of Melinda Paregien.

In 1876, Holy Trinity Catholic Church, itself, was located at 3519 N. 14th St. (14th St. & Mallinckrodt St.) in the community of New Bremen. It was just north of where the St. Louis city limits ended in that day.

On 19 Sept., 1877, the steamer Grand Republic burned down to the water’s edge as it lay at dock in the Mississippi River there at St. Louis. “The steamer Carondelet, laying alongside, was burned at the same time” (E. W. Gould, Fifty Years on the Mississippi. St. Louis, Mo: Nixon-Jones Printing Company, 1889, p. 436).

That second steamer, the Carondelet (named after a suburb of St. Louis), was one of the warships that James Alexander Paregien saw on the Tennessee River during the battles of Ft. Heiman and Ft. Donelson back in February of 1862.

It was in 1878 that John Pulitzer bought the bankrupt St. Louis Dispatch newspaper at auction. His name is now best-known for the annual prizes in literature.

1880

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien as a farmer who was 64 years of age (born in 1816 in Kentucky) and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri [main town in the area is Rolla, Mo.]. (Note the spelling of the first name for Jacob’s wife. That is the same spelling of her first name as given in the 1900 Census, when she was living with son Henry Pearigen and he listed her last name with the same variant spelling that he used. This is why we are now using the name of “Avis” as the first name for Jacob’s second wife. She listed her age, in 1880, as 52; occupation: “keeping house”)

The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  [RESEARCH NOTE:  Any school records available in Phelps County, Missouri?]

And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien.

Our Only Connection to Ireland

The 1880 Census says that both Jacob and his wife were born in Kentucky. His wife’s father was born in Georgia and her mother in South Carolina. SPECIAL NOTE: The Census says that Jacob’s father was born in IRELAND and his mother in SOUTH CAROLINA.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34-year-old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22-year-old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

 [NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card, # 494-40-4933, while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William Parmley.]

In addition, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists seven “Peregin” family members. One, an Ann C. Peregin, age 20 and born in about 1860 in Missouri, was a single white female living with her niece in Black River (Lawrence County), Arkansas.

Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced?

It is believed that Jacob Paregien worked as a Methodist minister and a carpenter during the last years of his life. [RESEARCH NOTE: Would there be a record of his ordination or other documentation with the Methodist Church?] 

Now, concerning the family connection with Ireland. We have found no other documentation, other than Jacob’s affirmation for the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, that any of the family came from Ireland. He did state that his father was from Ireland. Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Doug Paregine) firmly believed that Jacob was from Ireland, as she said Doug told her that on many different occasions [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in 1970].

In about 1970, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Jacob’s son, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien – or “Paregine” as Doug spelled the name) said that her father (Doug) investigated and all the Paregiens that he could find were definitely related to them.

Further, Lillian said that Doug always told them that his father (Jacob Paregien) “went back to Ireland to try and find some of the Paregien family. All he could find in Ireland was a Catholic priest. He was kinda afraid he was an illegitimate child by ‘Father Paregien’. Ha-ha.”. [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in Ventura, Calif., in 1970]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The photo on the previous page is of an unidentified woman standing in front of a house that Jacob M. Paregien supposedly built in St. Louis, Missouri (no date on photo). It was given to me by Melvin L. Pearigen in 1973. [Photo 1910-05]

In 1926, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine) received a letter from her first cousin, Eldora (“Dora”) Pearigen. Lillian told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that Dora told her in that letter about Dora’s father, Henry Clay Pearigen, going to St. Louis “to their old home place . . .  to see the house that his father built.” The house may have been the one pictured above, and Henry may very well have taken the photo.

Melvin L. Pearigen told me on Sept. 14, 1970 that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri.  That may be, but we just don’t have any proof. Ms. Corena Wegrzn, a volunteer genealogical researcher in Phelps County, Missouri sent an email to me on June 7, 2004. She said, “I did not locate Jacob Paregien (or near spellings) for a burial in Cemeteries of Phelps County, Missouri, Volume III. Nor did I locate him or any family in my records compiled for the state cemetery records. These records are not the complete records for all of Phelps.”

But then she added this: “I did locate a couple of marriages in the Phelps County (Missouri) Marriage book:

“(1)   “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This is certainly our Doug Paregine. It was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he met and married her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

“(2) Columbus F. Richardson, age 23 and Miss Mary A. Paregien, age 18. Jan. 19, 1883 (Book 3, pg. 092). Jonathan Harrison, Justice of the Peace (Rolla, Mo.) officiated. The groom was from West Plains (Howell County). J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”

Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900, perhaps in or near Rolla, Missouri.  The question remains: exactly when did he die and where is he buried?

1900

In the U.S. Federal Census for 1900 there is listed one   “Avis Pearigen” [this definitely is our Avis Paregien, second wife of Jacob Paregien, and mother of Henry Pearigen).

For some reason, Henry must have changed the spelling of his mother’s last name to match his own variation of the family name. The newspaper account of her death in the

Wapanucka, Oklahoma newspaper in 1902 lists her as ” Aries Pearrigen “. I guess if you’re going to get the spelling wrong, you might as well get both names wrong.

Is “Pearigen” the name under which she is buried and perhaps listed in a death certificate?

In the 1900 Census she is listed as 85 years of age and as having been born in Kentucky in about 1815. She is listed as the mother of the head of  the household (i.e., Henry Pearigen). She reported that she had given birth to 13 children, seven of which were living in 1900 (children by Daniel Parmley and by Jacob Paregien).

Further, Avis Paregien (i.e., Avis “Pearigen”) stated that she was a widow. That means Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between early 1883 and 1900. She also affirmed that she could neither read nor write.

(2)  Henry & Sarah Pearigen and children: Eldora Pearigen, Bird McKinley Pearigen, and Melvin L. Pearigen. Sarah reported that she had given birth to five children, three of which were still living. Henry’s occupation was listed as “farm manager” on rented land. Like many people of that day, he was a sharecropper. He worked the land and, in turn, gave a stipulated amount of the profits to the land owner.

That same 1900 Census listed in the same location  Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).  He had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

Thomas C. Guion’s wife was Lula M. Guion, age 18,  born  in Sept., 1881, in Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

When Did Jacob Mac Paregien Die?

When did Jacob Paregien die?  We don’t know, yet. However, he must have died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900 . He was present at the marriage of his daughter Mary in 1883, but in 1900 Avis Paregien reported to the U.S. Federal Census taker that she was a widow.

In October, 2005, as I was doing a final review of the file on Jacob, I discovered a line that I had missed previously. My mother, Evelyn Paregien, had interviewed Lillian Paregine Hughes in 1970 and said that a letter from Dora Pearigen in 1926 stated her father—Henry Pearigen—told her that his father, Jacob Paregien, had died in Spadra, Arkansas (“near Coalhill or Clarksville”).  

At this date, I have no way to prove or disprove that assertion. I personally believe Henry must have been talking about his brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, who certainly did die there. Here, again, it is something that the next generation of Paregien family genealogists will want to pursue.

Death of Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley)

Paregien

After the death of Jacob Paregien, his widow — Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien — moved to Wapanucka (Johnston County) to live with their son, Henry Clay Pearigen.

The Wapanucka Press newspaper on Feb. 6, 1902 gave this notice of her death:

Mrs. Aries Pearrigen, aged mother of H.C. Pearrigen, died at her home in this city Tuesday morning. The deceased was 76 years of age, was a member of the Methodist Church of long standing, and was loved and highly respected by all who knew her. Remains were interred in the cemetery in this city Tuesday evening amid a concourse of heart-broken relatives and sorrowing friends. The Press joins many friends in extending condolence to the bereaved family.

So she died on Tuesday, 4 February, 1902 in Wapanucka. Note that in this newspaper article her first name is spelled “Aries” and her last name is spelled sort of the way Henry spelled his last name. That was an error even at that, of course, because Henry spelled his name “Pearigen” with just one “r”.

Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien is buried in or near Wapanucka. The question remains as to which cemetery that may be. Later in 1902 the town decided to abandon their current cemetery (“by the school”) to adopt “the Brown cemetery” [1 1/2 miles south of town ] as the official city cemetery. Presumably, she was buried in the first cemetery, but we don’t know as yet. Still later the Brown Cemetery was abandoned and people used the Rose Hill Cemetery about 1 mile north of town.

Adding to the mystery is a note I recently found from when I talked on the telephone with Melvin L. Pearigen (Henry’s son) on Sept. 14, 1970. I was in Stroud, Oklahoma and he was at 1625 Madrona Ave., St. Helena, Calif. He said that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri. And he said his grandmother was buried in the church yard of the old Presbyterian church near Wapanucka. So where is that?

In July of 2005, I made a trip to Wapanucka and actually visited the Brown Cemetery located about 1 1/2 miles south of town and east of the highway. Unfortunately, the cemetery is abandoned and has been vandalized. The few tombstones that remain have been knocked over and it is covered with tall brush. I would not recommend going there. I could not find her tombstone.

Then in August, 2005 I  re-read a brochure by Letha Channell Clark titled, “Wapanucka: Glory Days — Early 1900s”. In that she states that “The first church was a Presbyterian church built south and west of Button Springs. It was also used as the first school . . .  This was the first subscription school started in this area . . . and only those who paid could attend.”

Ah, ha!  It would appear, then, that Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien [ perhaps known as “Pearigen” while living with son Henry Pearigen in Wapanucka] was buried in the original cemetery on the grounds of the Presbyterian church south of town — but that cemetery apparently is not the same as the Brown Cemetery. The mystery continues.

In October of 2005, I discovered Button Springs listed on the internet as one of the “ghost towns of Oklahoma”. It suggests that Button Springs was the original town site for what is now Wapanucka, but that it was moved sometime before 1900 to the present-day Wapanucka site and gave up the name Button Springs for Wapanucka.

That web site gave the directions to the Button Springs town site as follows: From Highway 69, take Highway 7 west into Wapanucka. Turn left at the stop sign and go south (toward Coleman and Durant). Turn into the last school road and park. Walk up the hill and you are now in Button Springs.

Well, here is something else. In making my final review of my file on Jacob and Avis Paregien, I found a small note from a short interview I had done at least 12 years ago with my aunt, Loretha Paregien Young of Duncan, Okla. I asked here where her great-grandmother was buried. She said the location was one mile south of Wapanucka, on the west side of the highway, in the corner of the property and that there were only a couple of other graves there.

And, to make it even more interesting, I recently spoke with Mrs. Louise Faulk of Wapanucka. She has lived there virtually all of her life. She remembers where the Presbyterian Church and the school were located. She says they were just south of town, on the right (west) side of the road. She says there is a hay barn near the few remaining tombstones.

So, there is still plenty of work to do to resolve the seemingly conflicting information and to find the tombstone (if one every existed).

FOOTNOTES

 The 1880 U.S. Census lists Jacob Paregien’s second wife name as “Avis” Paregien. It says she was born in 1828 in  Kentucky, that her father’s birthplace was Georgia and her mother’s birthplace was South Carolina. One document dated 10 Feb., 1857 lists her first name as “Arias”.

The 1860 U.S. Census for Jackson County spells the Parmley name as “Parmlee”.

The database of the Illinois Land Sales shows that Daniel Parmley purchased some land on 13 Sept., 1853. Record ID #429949 shows that he bought 40 acres of lace at $1.25 per acre in a Federal sale. The description was: County 39, Section 15, Section Pat SWSE, Township 09S, Range 03W, Meridian 3. Archive: Volume #32, page 173.

Daniel Parmley’s father was Hiel Parmlee and his mother was Rebecca Hardin. No doubt that Rebecca Parmley was named after her paternal-grandmother.

The Jackson County, Ill., Index of Cemeteries indicates there is a “Paregin” buried in “21”. That can refer to one of the following cemeteries:  (1) McBride Cemetery – this cemetery is not accessible (private land; swampy; or something). It is located in Kinkaid Township, Section 34, SW corner of SW Quarter.  (2) Christ Lutheran Cemetery – located in Fountain Bluff Township, Section 35.      (3) Modglin Cemetery – located in Bradly Township, Section 26, far west “26”.  (4) Morris-Creath Cemetery – Sand Ridge Township, Section 9. We were warned not to visit this cemetery during the warm months, as it is awfully “snaky”. However, Daniel Parmley’s first home was on Big Muddy River “between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge” until they moved “further north, in the same county”.

There is a Worthen Cemetery in Jackson County. In Murphysboro, go south on 20th for 4 or 5 miles (will be on the right). Several families moved together to Jackson County from Kentucky, including the Worthen and Parmley families. In fact, Robert Worthen married Daniel W. Parmley’s sister, Rebecca).

RESOURCES

Jacob M. Paregien is listed in the Family Search International Genealogical Index as Film Number 1904030. He is also listed as Jacob M. Paregin under #1903907.

Jackson County Historical Society Museum in Murphysboro, Ill.

Illinois State Historical Library, Newspaper Microfilm Section, Old State Capital, Springfield, IL. 62701-1507.  217-785-7941.

Southern Illinois University Library at Carbondale, Ill.

U.S. Federal Census Records 1800  to 1930.

I did an Internet search on every name in this section in February, 2005.

 

______________________   End of Part 3 of 3   ________________________

 

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Issue 366 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2

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       The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 366     –     Oct. 27, 2017

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2:

1857 to 1869

by Stan Paregien

 

Second Marriage: 

Avis  Murdon Parmley

On Feb. 10, 1857, widower Jacob Mac Paregien married a widow named Avis Murdon Parmley, of Jackson County, Ill. (His name is listed as McPerigirn” and her’s as Arvas Parmley” and the Justice of the Peace who performed the ceremony was Benjamin M. Redfield. –Register of Marriages: 1843-1958, Jackson County Courthouse). See the notes on the 1880 and 1900 U.S. Federal Census for why we have chosen to consistently use “Avis” as her first name.

Avis Murdon was born in about 1828 in Kentucky. Her father was born in Georgia and her mother was born in South Carolina (according to the 1880 U.S. Federal Census record, showing her at age 52 living with Jacob M. Paregien in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri).

Avis Murdon Parmley had six children by her first husband (Daniel Webster Parmley–he is buried in the Looney Springs Cemetery (Block 64, Lot 64) in Jackson County, ILL. It is located 3 miles west of Ava, Illinois on the north side of the highway. Stan and Peggy Paregien visited there, but could not find a tombstone).

Three of her children–John Wesley Parmley (born about 1842 in Ill.), Sarah Parmley and Robert  “Bob” Parmley (born about 1848 in Ill.)–died of typhoid fever in 1850.

So at the time of their marriage, Jacob brought seven (7) children to the dining table and  Avis Parmley brought three kids — for a total family of two adults and ten children.

Three of the children born to Daniel Parmley and Avis Parmley were still living when she married Jacob Paregien. Those children were:

  1. Rebecca Ann Parmley

Rebecca Ann Parmley was born about  1 Feb., 1846 in Ill.; (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. Addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky –far southwest Kentucky. She notes that Rebecca Parmley died “not too long ago”.)

The following information is from a booklet written by Mrs. Robert (Francis) Caudel (Rebecca’s daughter-in-law) on Feb. 1, 1940 to commemorate the life of Rebecca Ann Parmley. Lillian Mary Paregine Hughes, oldest daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, gave a copy of the booklet to Stan Paregien back in about 1970.

“On her ninety-third birthday, February the first, 1940, Mrs. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel was the guest of honor at a large gathering of relatives and friends at the home of her son and daughter-in-law, Robert and Frances Caudel, 3028 West 36th St., Los Angeles, California, with whom she has made her home for twenty-six years.

“These pleasant birthday parties and the occasional meeting of the ‘Becky Ann’ Club arranged by her daughters, Mrs. Ida Wheatley, Mrs. Birdie Soloman and Mrs. Frances Caudel.

“This story of the ‘little old lady in lavender’ was prepared by Mrs. Frances Caudel, and presented to aunt Rebecca in printed form by Margaret and Fred M. Rolens.

“While California was still Mexican territory and gold had not been discovered on the Pacific Coast and the United States and Mexico were at war, a baby girl, Rebecca Ann Parmley, was born in Jackson County, Illinois, February 1st, 1847.

“James K. Polk was President of the United States, the eleventh in line, but that day in the snow-covered home all that mattered was that the tiny baby girl had been born prematurely and the parents and neighborhood midwife, Aunty Polly Worthen, had a struggle ahead to keep her alive.

“There was neither a Dr. Dafoe of Dionne Quintuplet fame nor a telephone to summon aid, but just the common methods used in those days.

“So in place of the modern baby incubator, little Rebecca was kept wrapped in sweet-oil soaked linen clothes for two months while the firmer skin, finger and toe nails, eyebrows and other accessories could grow for her future use as she traveled down the long trail.

“Her father was Daniel Webster Parmley, son of Ezekiel Parmley of Kentucky. Rebecca Ann’s mother was Arys Murdon Parmley. The mother [Avis] with her sisters Mary, Nancy, Charita Ann and brother Edward Murdon were also from Kentucky.

“The Parmley, Murdon, Hyres, Boone, Will and Worthen families had come about 1830 from Kentucky and settled in rich bottom lands and on hills of Jackson County, Illinois, staying close to the creeks and rivers when possible.

“Daniel Parmley had his home on the banks of Big Muddy River between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge. It was a pretty spot for a home in this heavily timbered section, a few scattered meadows and the Kincaid Hills and Fountain Bluff nearby, with fertile sandy ridges for their garden and feed crops.

“Daniel Parmley built a tight, warm long home, with puncheon floors and Rebecca Ann could be kept very comfortable though she had arrived during a big snowstorm. Maybe that is the reason she still likes snow, though she is now content to just remember ‘Beautiful Snow’.

“When Rebecca Ann was about three years old [i.e., about 1850], an epidemic of typhoid fever broke out, which with malarial complications was the menace of the lowlands. She, with her sister and three brothers were very sick at the same time. Their mother cared for them day and night, but three of her children died, leaving only Rebecca and Harvey to comfort her parents, as they looked the last time on the three little ones, John, Sarah and Bob.

“Rebecca’s father decided to move his family to a healthier location further north, in the same county.

“Two years later [about 1852], when Rebecca was five years old, she had an attack of typhoid pneumonia and this time she was given up for dead and laid out in the ‘other room,’ and a messenger sent for a coffin. Her broken hearted father, mourning the loss of his daughter named for his two sisters (Rebecca and Ann), on removing the sheet from her face, detected signs of life and a feeble heart beat and overjoyed recalled the messenger. She was tenderly nursed back to health.

“Rebecca’s father, Daniel Parmley, had three sisters: Rebecca, who married Robert Worthen; Sarah, who married a Mr. Kirkendow; and Ann, who married William Hyres and at his death married James Plummer Watson. Daniel Parmley also had two brothers, Richard Parmley and Mathew Parmley.

“Her father purchased a farm, the deed to which was signed by President Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States.

“The father’s newly acquired farm in the higher part of the county had a fine stand of virgin pine, hickory, walnut and oak timber. Daniel and his partner, known to Rebecca only as ‘Dan’, cut logs and hauled them to the river, making it into rafts and floating them down the Mississippi river to New Orleans, Louisiana.

“It was a long journey. The return trip on flat boats was slow and tedious, but all was repaid by the well-filled bags of  silver they had received for the timber.

“Rebecca remembers welcoming the travelers and watching them divide the money, saying ‘This one for Dan, this one for Dan.’

“Also bright in her memory now are pictures of  the activities on that farm and the passing of the boats on the lower Big Muddy and Mississippi rivers (particularly the ones named, ‘Walk on the Water’ and ‘Silver Lake’). She also remembers walks with her father through the garden seeing ‘Love Apples’ (now known as tomatoes, but then considered rank poison) and she well remembers the time they shared their first tomato.

“In the meanwhile Mathew was born. A few years later, the father [Daniel Parmley], while away from home contracted pneumonia. The mother and three children on hearing of his sickness traveled overland by wagon and team, reaching him shortly before his death. He was buried in the Looney Springs burial ground, Jackson County, Illinois. [RESEARCH NOTE: Does anyone have a location in the cemetery or a photo of his tombstone? I visited there in about 2002, but could not find his grave. — SP]

“The widowed mother Arys Parmley left the farm, taking her three children, and lived with one of her brothers. Three years later the mother met Jacob McParegien, a widower with nine children. They fell in love as folks do. [Emphasis, mine. — SP]

“Rebecca’s little brother Harvey opposed the idea of any man taking his mother, and laid up a store of rocks, which he intended to use to chase the man away. But love won out.

“So Arys Parmley and Jacob McParegien were married and went to live on his farm nearby [emphasis mine, SP] where Rebecca and all the other eleven children helped their parents with the chores. One of the constant ones was to go down the hill a quarter of a mile to the spring to get water for the household uses.

“Rebecca could carry a full pail of water on her head and a full pail in each hand, the long path up hill from the spring. Perhaps that accounts for her erect carriage and fine poise to this day.

“The children carried corn and other feed to the hogs which were penned in, under an overhanging rock, which made a cave-like dry shelter.

“At night the children picked seed from the cotton bolls, each child having to fill one of his own shoes with seed each night. Lucky for Rebecca that her feet were tiny. They carded the cotton and spun it into thread. They also spun wool into yarn.

“Rebecca made the material which was woven into her first plaid dress of cotton and wool mixed, and the threads were dyed red, green, black and yellow.

“So their busy days hurried by until she was about thirteen years old, when the rumble of war was heard and all the young men and fathers, too, were called to the colors. [1861 — SP]  Then Rebecca and her half-sisters had to do the plowing, harvesting and all the rest of the hard work on the farm.

“Abraham Lincoln was now the President of the United States and had issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the Negro slaves. Many times the escaped run-away slaves appeared at the farmhouse.

“One time two of them had come to the smoke-house where the cured hams, bacon and other smoked meats were kept. One of the young lads in the family got his gun and with Rebecca at his side said he was going to ‘shoot that nigger’. Thrusting the gun through the wall, he was ready to shoot, when the Negro grabbed the gun and pulled it on through the wall and took it away with him, and the boy’s bravery suddenly melted into tears. The black men were harmless and only took two hams. Evidently they were too heavy, for they left one hanging on a tree near the farm.

“Rebecca’s step-father, Jacob McParagien [sic – SP], organized a company of soldiers and trained them for service, but he was denied the privilege of entering actual service on account of defective hearing.  [Emphasis mine — SP]

“While Rebecca was still in her early teens, her uncle and aunt, James P. Watson and Ann Parmley Watson, of Murphysboro, Illinois, invited her to come and make her home with them where there were better school advantages. She remained with them and their family, consisting of her cousins Bob, Mary, Carrie and Frankie, for many happy years.

“In the school she attended thee were two boys, John Haltwick and Don Ozburn, who did not like the grammar lessons. So when the time came to hear these classes, out through the window went the books, followed by the two boys, to the astonishment of the crippled school-master, Mr. McClarey, who crossed the room with the assistance of his faithful cane, and closed the window.

“About this time Rebecca commenced having her little love affairs, aided and abetted by her cousin Bob [Watson], who placed the ladder against the upstairs bedroom window and helped Beccy [sic – SP] escape to attend parties with him where she met and danced away the happy hours with the young soldier who afterward became her husband.

“Near the close of the Civil War the people of Murphysboro heard that a regiment of Union soldiers were to march through the town. Everyone was decorating their homes with flags and bunting, so Rebecca and her cousins thought they should do their patriotic bit. But in their home was a Confederate flag and Rebecca, not realizing the danger or the significance, waved the flag out an upper window. Her uncle [James P.] Watson, standing in the nearby courthouse door, where he was County Circuit Clerk, hastened home and disposed of the flag before the Union soldiers came by.

“While a young woman in the Watson home, she attended the Northern Methodist Church where she was converted and began the ‘Heavenly path that shineth more and more unto the Perfect Day’.

“When only seventeen, she had a class of younger girls in the Methodist Sunday School. She still can remember the names of them, Mary Butcher, Amelia Kennedy, Margaret Wilson and Anna Williams.

“When the Civil War was over and Rebecca twenty years of age, she was married to John Haltwick [on 30 March, 1867 in Jackson County, Illinois — Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, M731435, 1843-1879, 0968927  IT 2-3, Film]. And a very pretty picture she must have made with her curly black hair arranged into forty-two curls hanging down to her shoulders. The wedding dress was made of white swiss made with full skirt and full sleeves with a narrow band holding the fullness in at the hand.

“To them came four children, two boys and two girls. The two little boys were taken back into Heaven, one at two years of age, the other at fifteen months.

“The little girls, Ada and Carrie [born in 1875], grew to womanhood. The older one, Ada, passed away May 20, 1900. Carrie [Haltwick] Pigott is living today [1940] , in Murphysboro, Illinois.

“On April 20, 1877, after a married life of only ten years, Mr. Haltwick died. Rebecca was left a widow with two little daughters.

“In those days women were not trained to make their own way as they now are. So Rebecca, very well trained in the homemaking art, turned her hand to dress making and other things she could find to do.

“She was hostess in the town’s public library or reading room as it was known in those days. There she met Mr. Sion R. Caudel, a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the son of a Tennessee Baptist preacher. A few years later they were married. To them were born three children: Ida, Bob and Birdie Caudel.

“Life went on with its varied interests and tasks, such as housekeeping, tending babies, washing necks and ears, wiping bloody noses, wrapping up stubbed toes, kissing cut fingers, patching skinned shins and all the other joys of motherhood.

“She sent them to school and took them to Methodist Sunday School and sat with them in the pew at the Sunday morning service, at the same time serving four years as a Stewardess in the Church, an honored position.

“Again the Grim Reaper reached out his sickle for the ripened grain and the husband and father was gathered into the fold of the Redeemer above.

“One more Rebecca with faith and courage took up the burden and carried it cheerfully and well. Until one day the postman brought a letter from the Golden West, from her son Bob [Caudel], in Los Angeles, containing a railroad ticket and Pullman reservations and an invitation to ‘come up and see us sometime.’ She came, she saw, she conquered.

“That was twenty-six years ago. Today she is very happy to greet you, each and every one, on this occasion of  her ninety-third birthday, February 1st, 1940.”

The 1930 Federal Census states that Rebecca A. Caudel was living with her son, Robert W. Caudel and his wife Frances, in Los Angeles, Calif. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel died in California in about 1941 at the age of 94, we think. [RESEARCH NOTE: No record for her in the California Death Record index.]

According to the California Death Records, Robert Watson Caudel was born in Missouri on 2 June, 1881. He died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 20 Sept., 1950 at age 71. His wife, Frances Caudel, was born 23 Feb., 1876 in Kansas. She died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 25 Oct., 1950 at age 74.

  1. William Harvey Parmley

William Harvey Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in June, 1845 in Missouri. He married in about 1879 to Ellen _________________.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Clay Pearigen.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census also lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34 year old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22 year old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

[NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William R. Parmley, son of William H. Parmley.]

  1. Matthew Parmley

Matthew Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in Feb., 1853. He married Carrie ________________. Lillian Paregien Hughes said that Matthew  was blind.

Jacob and his second wife and their large number of children lived on his farm. They hauled water to the house from a spring about one-quarter of a mile away.

 

CHILDREN BORN TO

JACOB  &  AVIS PAREGIEN

Jacob and Avis Paregien went on to have four children of their own (That made a total of 14 children sired by Jacob Paregien). Their four children were:

  1. Nancy Paregien

Nancy Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien, in about 1858, probably in Jackson County, Illinois. [See family photo: 1892-02.]

At age 16 she  married Anton (or Antoine) Guion (age 21) on 14 Oct., 1874 in St. Louis, Ill. by  Charles Picken, Justice of the Peace. Official witnesses were C.W. Guion and Lizzie Smith. [Marriage Index of St. Louis County. The marriage was filed and recorded on 29 Dec., 1874].  He definitely was of French heritage, as there are lots of Guion’s in Canada and France.

In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census the above three children were living with their grandparents, Jacob & Avis Paregien, at Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

The children were listed, with an error in spelling, as  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). The correct spelling of their last name is “Guion”.

1880--03--B -- Nancy Paregien Guion - daughters May and Maud Guion

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion and daughters and an unidentified child. Date unknown. [Photo 1880-03]

1898--03 Nancy Paregien Guion-family

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion with family (and son-in-law??). Date unknown. [Photo 1898-03]

1898-02-NancyParegienGuion--StLouis

I’m a little confused about this photo. Taken in about 1898 (??), the label I put on it in about 1973 says it “shows (l to r) Nancy Paregien Guion (daughter of Jacob & Avis Paregien) and her mother Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien. The woman on the right is Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion.  [Photo 1898-02]”. Now, I don’t know if that is correct. Instead, I belived the woman on the left is May Guion and the woman in the center is May’s mother, Nancy Paregien Guion. At first, I thought maybe the woman on the right was May’s sister, Maud. However, looking at the two previous photos of the sisters, they appear to be about the same height . . . but the woman at right in this photo is considerably shorter than May Guion. So she may indeed be Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion. That’s my best guess.

One source indicates that Antoine Guion was born in 1853 and his parents were Barthelmi Guion and Marguerite Barada. [http://www.stlgs.org/efdb/d238.htm#P27037 ]. This Mr. Guion’s age would be about right. [There was a much older Antoine Guion born in 1832 in Carondelet, St. Louis, Missouri. His father or maybe an uncle??]

Nancy and Mr. Guion had at least three children:  May Guion, Maud Guion and Thomas Guion.

Melvin L. Pearigen wrote me in on 30 April, 1973 and said: “I was through St. Louis in 1922. Her [“Aunt Nancy’] and her husband, he’s a Frenchman by the name of Guion, . . . owned a rooming house and was selling it to buy a chicken ranch near Springfield, Missouri. And that’s the last I ever heard of them.”

The St. Louis City Directory for 1880 lists Antoine Guion as a gardener (or a guard; “ard.”) and living on 4th Street near Fillmore.  We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien. Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced or simply were not listed?

The 1900 U.S. Federal Census shows Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion) living in Township 3, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (Atoka County, Okla.). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).

Thomas C. Guion had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

His wife was Lula M. ________ Guion, age 18. She was  born  in Sept., 1881, in  Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1905 lists one “Nannie Guion” living at 1401 Chauteau Ave. Could this “Nannie” be our Nancy?

1910--04 HenryPearigen-OllieGuion Family

In the photo above, Henry Pearigen stands between his brother-in-law, Anton Guion, and his sister, Nancy Paregien Guion [Photo 1910-04]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The 1930 U.S. Federal Census shows a Thomas Guion, age 51,  living with his wife, Lula Guion in the Independent City section of St. Louis (St. Louis County), Missouri. He was born to Antoine Guion & Nancy Paregien Guion in about 1879.

NOTE: A certain “Filbert Antoine Guion” died in Lincoln County, Missouri on 17, June, 1903. He had been born about 1854 in Missouri. [Source: Lincoln County, Missouri Deaths: 1866-1896, an online database created by Kenneth E. Weant.] 

 

  1. Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (later “Paregine”)

Doug Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, on 31 May, 1861 at Murphysboro (Jackson County, Illinois). 

Like his full-brother, Henry Clay Paregien,  Doug began using an alternate spelling of the family name. And while Henry spelled it “Pearigen” Doug spelled it  “Paregine.”  The big unanswered question is this: why they would take on such spellings, even when living close to other relatives who maintained the original spelling? Strange, indeed.

Apparently Jacob and Avis Paregien must have been impressed by Illinois politician and U.S. Senator Stephen Arnold Douglas so much so that they named their second child after him. It makes one wonder whether they ever heard the famous Senator speak in person. He debated his little-known Republican opponent Abraham Lincoln in many cities across Illinois in 1858 for the U.S. Senate seat. Douglas won that contest, but Lincoln beat him for the job of President of the United States in 1860.

Were the Paregiens registered Democrats?

The Phelps County, Missouri Marriage Book  lists one  “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he wed her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

  1. Mary A. Paregien

Mary A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien, in about 1864, near the end of the Civil War. This Mary Paregien is not to be confused with the Mary Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien.

The 1880 Census for Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri has Mary A. Paregien as age 16 and living with their mom and dad, Jacob and Avis Paregien.

Mary A. Paregien married Columbus F. Richardson, age 23, on 19 Jan., 1883. Jonathan Harrison, a Justice of Peace in Rolla, Missouri performed the ceremony. Columbus Richardson was from West Plains (Howell County), Missouri. The record states “J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”(Phelps County Missouri Marriages, Book 3, p. 092).

As it turns out, Columbus Richardson is a very common name in the United States. And often the Census records show that the so-named person of a Black or Mulatto. In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census there was a Columbus Richardson (age 70, born about 1860 in Missouri) living in the Kansas City (Jackson County), Missouri area as a boarder.

  1. Henry Clay Paregien (later “Pearigen”)

Henry Clay Paregien  was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien in St. Louis, Missouri on 4 Aug., 1867 (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. It was addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky [far southwest Kentucky]).

For some unknown reason, Henry spelled his last name as “Pearigen”. So there is now an entire line of the family spelling it that way. And there are a great number of other folks, who may or may not be related, who spell their name that way (lots of them in Tennessee and Kentucky).

And to just make it more confusing, Henry Clay Paregien’s full-brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien, also started using a variant spelling of the last name — and it was even different from the one Henry used! Doug Paregien became Doug “Paregine”.

 

______________ Miscellaneous Notes ________________

Lillian Paregien Hughes told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that she remembered seeing her grandmother Avis Paregien. She said that Avis smoked a pipe, and she swept the floors with a short-handled broom, which she had to stoop to use. Lillian also recalled seeing her wash their clothes. They had a tree stump which they would beat their clothes on, after soaking them, to get them clean. She wore her hair slicked back in a knot.

In later life, Avis lived with her son, Henry Clay Pearigen, at Wapanucka (Johnston County), Okla.

On 1 March, 1859, there was a “James Parigen” of Iron County, Missouri who purchased 120 acres of land at or near Jackson (Cape Giradeau County), Missouri. The official land description was: The south half of the SE quarter and the NE quarter of the SE quarter of Section 22, in Township 32N of R4E, in the District of Sands.” This land is located only about 30 miles from the Paregien home base of Murphysboro (Jackson County), Illinois.  Was this our James A. Paregien, who would have turned 18 on 21 March, 1859?

1860

The 8th Census of the United States, done in 1860, for Jackson County, Illinois shows two Paregien-related families living in Township 8, Range 3W.

  1. William H. “Paragen” – #748 listing — a day laborer, age 23, born in Missouri. Also lists a female named Huldy Paragen, age 21, born in Illinois. Also lists Eliza J Paragen, born in Illinois and her age shown as “8/12”, meaning she was only 8 months of age. William H. Paregien was the eldest son of Jacob and his first wife, Nancy (or “Nanley”) Morgan, born on Nov. 23, 1837. Apparently he was living in his own home, with his wife and a child. [RESEARCH NOTE: Is there a birth certificate available in Missouri? ]
  2. Jacob “Paragen” – #749 listing — a farmer, age 44, born in Kentucky and married to Arris (or perhaps, “Avis”; hard to read the writing) Paragen”, age 34, born in Kentucky. Others living in that household included Jacob’s children by his first wife :(a) James Paragen – age 19, born in Ill; (b) Elizabeth Paragen – age 14, born in Missouri; (c) Sarah – age 10, born in Missouri; (d) Samuel – age 8, born in Illinois; and (e) Nancy – age 2, born in Illinois. It also included the children of his second wife “Erris” (or Aryns or Avis) — (a) William H. Parmlee – age 15, born in Missouri; (b) Rebecca Parmlee – age 12, born in Missouri; and (c) Matthew Parmlee – age 5, born in Illinois. And then there was a man living with them named Tobias Penrod, age 75, born in Pennsylvania.[Who the heck was he? ]

During the Civil War, Jacob M. Paregien organized a trained a company of soldiers for the Union Army. However, he was so hard of hearing that he himself could not enlist. His son, James Alexander Paregien, did join the service.

There is, however, a record of one “Jacob Peargin” (also spelled “Pergin”) being in the 7th Missouri Infantry, serving as a Private in Company G. (Box 000390, Extraction 0037)

The Military Census of 1862 for Jackson County recorded two Union soldiers who hailed from Levan Township (Town 8 South, Range 3 West):   (1)  William Perigan, age 27, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 81st Regiment; and (2) James Perigan, age 22, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 27th Regiment.

1865  –  End of the Civil War between the northern states and the southern states.

1868  –   The approximate year when Jacob Mac Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien moved to St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

Louise E. Paregien,  one of  the daughters of Jacob & Nancy Paregien, married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869. [Her name may also be read as “Louisa E. Pariagein”]

   ________________________   End of Part 2  of 3  ____________________

Oh, hey, a couple of other things.

I am now publishing a free newsletter titled “An Encouraging Word.” It is a periodic publication, sent only once or twice a month. Our goal: “To share positive ideas and to encourage acts of kindness.” To be added to my mailing list, just write to me at paregien@gmail.com and in the subject line put “Encouraging Word.” Easy, huh?

Also, my most recent music video can be found online at YouTube. After I read how the Boy Scouts organization (reeling from large membership losses) was mounting an agressive campaign to recruit Girl Scout employees, troop leaders and girls. So I sat down and wrote a song titled, “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts.” It is at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-_iMT3rPgk

Thanks.

 

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