Category Archives: Biography

Issue 367 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    –     Issue 367     –     Oct. 27, 2027

 

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3:

1870 to 1902

[Note: Most of the information in this 3-part blog may be found in the research which I did for my self-published book, Paregien Family History: 1816 to 2006. That book, published in 2006 and having some 675 pages, covers the following related groups: Paregien, Paregine, Peargin and Pearigen. — SP]

The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin”, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township and her occupation as “Domestic”. It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township. [RESEARCH NOTE: Did this child belong to Elizabeth Paregien??]

The St. Louis City Directory (which only lists the head of the household) for 1870-71 lists J.M. Paregien, “carpenter and builder,” with a business at 310 N. 7th St. and his residence at 1417 Cass Avenue. In December of 2004, Stan Paregien, Sr., tried to visit these spots. The business address is now part of a large area where the football stadium where the former St. Louis Rams team stands. And the residential address, close to the downtown area, is a vacant lot.

2004-104 St Louis, MO - Stan Paregien at the place where Jacob Paregien lived after 1865

Stan Paregien, Sr. in 2004 in front of 1417 Cass Ave., in St. Louis. The vacant lot to the left of this building was both the residence and business address for Jacob M. Paregien back in 1870. [Photo 2004-104]

The St. Louis City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for “J.M. Paregien”

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien)  to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

1874 -- 01 The Eads bridge was dedicated in St Louis on July 4, 1874and still operates in 2017

In 1874, the Eads Bridge, the very first bridge in St. Louis to cross the mighty Mississippi, was dedicated with famous  a famous Civil War soldier, General William T. Sherman presiding. It was Gen. Sherman who took his Union troops on the march across Georgia, destroying most everything in sight. That bridge is still there and in 2016 was carrying about 8,000 vehicles each day between St. Louis, Missouri and East St. Louis, Illinois.

14 Oct, 1874   –   Marriage of Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien) at age 16 to 21 year old Antoine (“Ollie”) Guion in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1874-75 Lists “Jacob Mac Paregien”, a carpenter, living on East Pennsylvania near Neosho St.

The Union Railroad Depot, a magnificent structure, opened at 12th and Poplar Streets. Today the old Depot houses dozens of upscale retail shops and restaurants and is still quite beautiful.

The 1876 directory lists him as “John M. Paregien, builder, Pennsylvania Ave. near Neosho. And it lists Jacob’s son, Samuel, as a laborer who boarded at the same address.

So, the last documentation we have of him living in St. Louis is in 1876.

28 Jan., 1876   –   Death of 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

According to other sources, Holy Trinity was a “poor man’s” Catholic Cemetery where mainly German and some Irish immigrants from north St. Louis were buried. In 1878 it was called “New Bremen Cemetery”. And in 1909 city fathers decided to use that land to create O’Fallon Park and they ordered the graves to be moved to Calvary Cemetery at 5239 W. Florissant (Calvary Cemetery Association, 5239 W. Florissant, St. Louis, MO 63115    Phone 381-1313). In July of 2005, I went there and they checked their computer and had no record of Melinda Paregien.

In 1876, Holy Trinity Catholic Church, itself, was located at 3519 N. 14th St. (14th St. & Mallinckrodt St.) in the community of New Bremen. It was just north of where the St. Louis city limits ended in that day.

On 19 Sept., 1877, the steamer Grand Republic burned down to the water’s edge as it lay at dock in the Mississippi River there at St. Louis. “The steamer Carondelet, laying alongside, was burned at the same time” (E. W. Gould, Fifty Years on the Mississippi. St. Louis, Mo: Nixon-Jones Printing Company, 1889, p. 436).

That second steamer, the Carondelet (named after a suburb of St. Louis), was one of the warships that James Alexander Paregien saw on the Tennessee River during the battles of Ft. Heiman and Ft. Donelson back in February of 1862.

It was in 1878 that John Pulitzer bought the bankrupt St. Louis Dispatch newspaper at auction. His name is now best-known for the annual prizes in literature.

1880

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien as a farmer who was 64 years of age (born in 1816 in Kentucky) and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri [main town in the area is Rolla, Mo.]. (Note the spelling of the first name for Jacob’s wife. That is the same spelling of her first name as given in the 1900 Census, when she was living with son Henry Pearigen and he listed her last name with the same variant spelling that he used. This is why we are now using the name of “Avis” as the first name for Jacob’s second wife. She listed her age, in 1880, as 52; occupation: “keeping house”)

The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  [RESEARCH NOTE:  Any school records available in Phelps County, Missouri?]

And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien.

Our Only Connection to Ireland

The 1880 Census says that both Jacob and his wife were born in Kentucky. His wife’s father was born in Georgia and her mother in South Carolina. SPECIAL NOTE: The Census says that Jacob’s father was born in IRELAND and his mother in SOUTH CAROLINA.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34-year-old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22-year-old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

 [NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card, # 494-40-4933, while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William Parmley.]

In addition, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists seven “Peregin” family members. One, an Ann C. Peregin, age 20 and born in about 1860 in Missouri, was a single white female living with her niece in Black River (Lawrence County), Arkansas.

Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced?

It is believed that Jacob Paregien worked as a Methodist minister and a carpenter during the last years of his life. [RESEARCH NOTE: Would there be a record of his ordination or other documentation with the Methodist Church?] 

Now, concerning the family connection with Ireland. We have found no other documentation, other than Jacob’s affirmation for the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, that any of the family came from Ireland. He did state that his father was from Ireland. Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Doug Paregine) firmly believed that Jacob was from Ireland, as she said Doug told her that on many different occasions [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in 1970].

In about 1970, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Jacob’s son, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien – or “Paregine” as Doug spelled the name) said that her father (Doug) investigated and all the Paregiens that he could find were definitely related to them.

Further, Lillian said that Doug always told them that his father (Jacob Paregien) “went back to Ireland to try and find some of the Paregien family. All he could find in Ireland was a Catholic priest. He was kinda afraid he was an illegitimate child by ‘Father Paregien’. Ha-ha.”. [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in Ventura, Calif., in 1970]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The photo on the previous page is of an unidentified woman standing in front of a house that Jacob M. Paregien supposedly built in St. Louis, Missouri (no date on photo). It was given to me by Melvin L. Pearigen in 1973. [Photo 1910-05]

In 1926, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine) received a letter from her first cousin, Eldora (“Dora”) Pearigen. Lillian told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that Dora told her in that letter about Dora’s father, Henry Clay Pearigen, going to St. Louis “to their old home place . . .  to see the house that his father built.” The house may have been the one pictured above, and Henry may very well have taken the photo.

Melvin L. Pearigen told me on Sept. 14, 1970 that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri.  That may be, but we just don’t have any proof. Ms. Corena Wegrzn, a volunteer genealogical researcher in Phelps County, Missouri sent an email to me on June 7, 2004. She said, “I did not locate Jacob Paregien (or near spellings) for a burial in Cemeteries of Phelps County, Missouri, Volume III. Nor did I locate him or any family in my records compiled for the state cemetery records. These records are not the complete records for all of Phelps.”

But then she added this: “I did locate a couple of marriages in the Phelps County (Missouri) Marriage book:

“(1)   “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This is certainly our Doug Paregine. It was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he met and married her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

“(2) Columbus F. Richardson, age 23 and Miss Mary A. Paregien, age 18. Jan. 19, 1883 (Book 3, pg. 092). Jonathan Harrison, Justice of the Peace (Rolla, Mo.) officiated. The groom was from West Plains (Howell County). J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”

Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900, perhaps in or near Rolla, Missouri.  The question remains: exactly when did he die and where is he buried?

1900

In the U.S. Federal Census for 1900 there is listed one   “Avis Pearigen” [this definitely is our Avis Paregien, second wife of Jacob Paregien, and mother of Henry Pearigen).

For some reason, Henry must have changed the spelling of his mother’s last name to match his own variation of the family name. The newspaper account of her death in the

Wapanucka, Oklahoma newspaper in 1902 lists her as ” Aries Pearrigen “. I guess if you’re going to get the spelling wrong, you might as well get both names wrong.

Is “Pearigen” the name under which she is buried and perhaps listed in a death certificate?

In the 1900 Census she is listed as 85 years of age and as having been born in Kentucky in about 1815. She is listed as the mother of the head of  the household (i.e., Henry Pearigen). She reported that she had given birth to 13 children, seven of which were living in 1900 (children by Daniel Parmley and by Jacob Paregien).

Further, Avis Paregien (i.e., Avis “Pearigen”) stated that she was a widow. That means Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between early 1883 and 1900. She also affirmed that she could neither read nor write.

(2)  Henry & Sarah Pearigen and children: Eldora Pearigen, Bird McKinley Pearigen, and Melvin L. Pearigen. Sarah reported that she had given birth to five children, three of which were still living. Henry’s occupation was listed as “farm manager” on rented land. Like many people of that day, he was a sharecropper. He worked the land and, in turn, gave a stipulated amount of the profits to the land owner.

That same 1900 Census listed in the same location  Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).  He had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

Thomas C. Guion’s wife was Lula M. Guion, age 18,  born  in Sept., 1881, in Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

When Did Jacob Mac Paregien Die?

When did Jacob Paregien die?  We don’t know, yet. However, he must have died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900 . He was present at the marriage of his daughter Mary in 1883, but in 1900 Avis Paregien reported to the U.S. Federal Census taker that she was a widow.

In October, 2005, as I was doing a final review of the file on Jacob, I discovered a line that I had missed previously. My mother, Evelyn Paregien, had interviewed Lillian Paregine Hughes in 1970 and said that a letter from Dora Pearigen in 1926 stated her father—Henry Pearigen—told her that his father, Jacob Paregien, had died in Spadra, Arkansas (“near Coalhill or Clarksville”).  

At this date, I have no way to prove or disprove that assertion. I personally believe Henry must have been talking about his brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, who certainly did die there. Here, again, it is something that the next generation of Paregien family genealogists will want to pursue.

Death of Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley)

Paregien

After the death of Jacob Paregien, his widow — Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien — moved to Wapanucka (Johnston County) to live with their son, Henry Clay Pearigen.

The Wapanucka Press newspaper on Feb. 6, 1902 gave this notice of her death:

Mrs. Aries Pearrigen, aged mother of H.C. Pearrigen, died at her home in this city Tuesday morning. The deceased was 76 years of age, was a member of the Methodist Church of long standing, and was loved and highly respected by all who knew her. Remains were interred in the cemetery in this city Tuesday evening amid a concourse of heart-broken relatives and sorrowing friends. The Press joins many friends in extending condolence to the bereaved family.

So she died on Tuesday, 4 February, 1902 in Wapanucka. Note that in this newspaper article her first name is spelled “Aries” and her last name is spelled sort of the way Henry spelled his last name. That was an error even at that, of course, because Henry spelled his name “Pearigen” with just one “r”.

Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien is buried in or near Wapanucka. The question remains as to which cemetery that may be. Later in 1902 the town decided to abandon their current cemetery (“by the school”) to adopt “the Brown cemetery” [1 1/2 miles south of town ] as the official city cemetery. Presumably, she was buried in the first cemetery, but we don’t know as yet. Still later the Brown Cemetery was abandoned and people used the Rose Hill Cemetery about 1 mile north of town.

Adding to the mystery is a note I recently found from when I talked on the telephone with Melvin L. Pearigen (Henry’s son) on Sept. 14, 1970. I was in Stroud, Oklahoma and he was at 1625 Madrona Ave., St. Helena, Calif. He said that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri. And he said his grandmother was buried in the church yard of the old Presbyterian church near Wapanucka. So where is that?

In July of 2005, I made a trip to Wapanucka and actually visited the Brown Cemetery located about 1 1/2 miles south of town and east of the highway. Unfortunately, the cemetery is abandoned and has been vandalized. The few tombstones that remain have been knocked over and it is covered with tall brush. I would not recommend going there. I could not find her tombstone.

Then in August, 2005 I  re-read a brochure by Letha Channell Clark titled, “Wapanucka: Glory Days — Early 1900s”. In that she states that “The first church was a Presbyterian church built south and west of Button Springs. It was also used as the first school . . .  This was the first subscription school started in this area . . . and only those who paid could attend.”

Ah, ha!  It would appear, then, that Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien [ perhaps known as “Pearigen” while living with son Henry Pearigen in Wapanucka] was buried in the original cemetery on the grounds of the Presbyterian church south of town — but that cemetery apparently is not the same as the Brown Cemetery. The mystery continues.

In October of 2005, I discovered Button Springs listed on the internet as one of the “ghost towns of Oklahoma”. It suggests that Button Springs was the original town site for what is now Wapanucka, but that it was moved sometime before 1900 to the present-day Wapanucka site and gave up the name Button Springs for Wapanucka.

That web site gave the directions to the Button Springs town site as follows: From Highway 69, take Highway 7 west into Wapanucka. Turn left at the stop sign and go south (toward Coleman and Durant). Turn into the last school road and park. Walk up the hill and you are now in Button Springs.

Well, here is something else. In making my final review of my file on Jacob and Avis Paregien, I found a small note from a short interview I had done at least 12 years ago with my aunt, Loretha Paregien Young of Duncan, Okla. I asked here where her great-grandmother was buried. She said the location was one mile south of Wapanucka, on the west side of the highway, in the corner of the property and that there were only a couple of other graves there.

And, to make it even more interesting, I recently spoke with Mrs. Louise Faulk of Wapanucka. She has lived there virtually all of her life. She remembers where the Presbyterian Church and the school were located. She says they were just south of town, on the right (west) side of the road. She says there is a hay barn near the few remaining tombstones.

So, there is still plenty of work to do to resolve the seemingly conflicting information and to find the tombstone (if one every existed).

FOOTNOTES

 The 1880 U.S. Census lists Jacob Paregien’s second wife name as “Avis” Paregien. It says she was born in 1828 in  Kentucky, that her father’s birthplace was Georgia and her mother’s birthplace was South Carolina. One document dated 10 Feb., 1857 lists her first name as “Arias”.

The 1860 U.S. Census for Jackson County spells the Parmley name as “Parmlee”.

The database of the Illinois Land Sales shows that Daniel Parmley purchased some land on 13 Sept., 1853. Record ID #429949 shows that he bought 40 acres of lace at $1.25 per acre in a Federal sale. The description was: County 39, Section 15, Section Pat SWSE, Township 09S, Range 03W, Meridian 3. Archive: Volume #32, page 173.

Daniel Parmley’s father was Hiel Parmlee and his mother was Rebecca Hardin. No doubt that Rebecca Parmley was named after her paternal-grandmother.

The Jackson County, Ill., Index of Cemeteries indicates there is a “Paregin” buried in “21”. That can refer to one of the following cemeteries:  (1) McBride Cemetery – this cemetery is not accessible (private land; swampy; or something). It is located in Kinkaid Township, Section 34, SW corner of SW Quarter.  (2) Christ Lutheran Cemetery – located in Fountain Bluff Township, Section 35.      (3) Modglin Cemetery – located in Bradly Township, Section 26, far west “26”.  (4) Morris-Creath Cemetery – Sand Ridge Township, Section 9. We were warned not to visit this cemetery during the warm months, as it is awfully “snaky”. However, Daniel Parmley’s first home was on Big Muddy River “between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge” until they moved “further north, in the same county”.

There is a Worthen Cemetery in Jackson County. In Murphysboro, go south on 20th for 4 or 5 miles (will be on the right). Several families moved together to Jackson County from Kentucky, including the Worthen and Parmley families. In fact, Robert Worthen married Daniel W. Parmley’s sister, Rebecca).

RESOURCES

Jacob M. Paregien is listed in the Family Search International Genealogical Index as Film Number 1904030. He is also listed as Jacob M. Paregin under #1903907.

Jackson County Historical Society Museum in Murphysboro, Ill.

Illinois State Historical Library, Newspaper Microfilm Section, Old State Capital, Springfield, IL. 62701-1507.  217-785-7941.

Southern Illinois University Library at Carbondale, Ill.

U.S. Federal Census Records 1800  to 1930.

I did an Internet search on every name in this section in February, 2005.

 

______________________   End of Part 3 of 3   ________________________

 

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Issue 366 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2

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       The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 366     –     Oct. 27, 2017

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2:

1857 to 1869

by Stan Paregien

 

Second Marriage: 

Avis  Murdon Parmley

On Feb. 10, 1857, widower Jacob Mac Paregien married a widow named Avis Murdon Parmley, of Jackson County, Ill. (His name is listed as McPerigirn” and her’s as Arvas Parmley” and the Justice of the Peace who performed the ceremony was Benjamin M. Redfield. –Register of Marriages: 1843-1958, Jackson County Courthouse). See the notes on the 1880 and 1900 U.S. Federal Census for why we have chosen to consistently use “Avis” as her first name.

Avis Murdon was born in about 1828 in Kentucky. Her father was born in Georgia and her mother was born in South Carolina (according to the 1880 U.S. Federal Census record, showing her at age 52 living with Jacob M. Paregien in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri).

Avis Murdon Parmley had six children by her first husband (Daniel Webster Parmley–he is buried in the Looney Springs Cemetery (Block 64, Lot 64) in Jackson County, ILL. It is located 3 miles west of Ava, Illinois on the north side of the highway. Stan and Peggy Paregien visited there, but could not find a tombstone).

Three of her children–John Wesley Parmley (born about 1842 in Ill.), Sarah Parmley and Robert  “Bob” Parmley (born about 1848 in Ill.)–died of typhoid fever in 1850.

So at the time of their marriage, Jacob brought seven (7) children to the dining table and  Avis Parmley brought three kids — for a total family of two adults and ten children.

Three of the children born to Daniel Parmley and Avis Parmley were still living when she married Jacob Paregien. Those children were:

  1. Rebecca Ann Parmley

Rebecca Ann Parmley was born about  1 Feb., 1846 in Ill.; (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. Addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky –far southwest Kentucky. She notes that Rebecca Parmley died “not too long ago”.)

The following information is from a booklet written by Mrs. Robert (Francis) Caudel (Rebecca’s daughter-in-law) on Feb. 1, 1940 to commemorate the life of Rebecca Ann Parmley. Lillian Mary Paregine Hughes, oldest daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, gave a copy of the booklet to Stan Paregien back in about 1970.

“On her ninety-third birthday, February the first, 1940, Mrs. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel was the guest of honor at a large gathering of relatives and friends at the home of her son and daughter-in-law, Robert and Frances Caudel, 3028 West 36th St., Los Angeles, California, with whom she has made her home for twenty-six years.

“These pleasant birthday parties and the occasional meeting of the ‘Becky Ann’ Club arranged by her daughters, Mrs. Ida Wheatley, Mrs. Birdie Soloman and Mrs. Frances Caudel.

“This story of the ‘little old lady in lavender’ was prepared by Mrs. Frances Caudel, and presented to aunt Rebecca in printed form by Margaret and Fred M. Rolens.

“While California was still Mexican territory and gold had not been discovered on the Pacific Coast and the United States and Mexico were at war, a baby girl, Rebecca Ann Parmley, was born in Jackson County, Illinois, February 1st, 1847.

“James K. Polk was President of the United States, the eleventh in line, but that day in the snow-covered home all that mattered was that the tiny baby girl had been born prematurely and the parents and neighborhood midwife, Aunty Polly Worthen, had a struggle ahead to keep her alive.

“There was neither a Dr. Dafoe of Dionne Quintuplet fame nor a telephone to summon aid, but just the common methods used in those days.

“So in place of the modern baby incubator, little Rebecca was kept wrapped in sweet-oil soaked linen clothes for two months while the firmer skin, finger and toe nails, eyebrows and other accessories could grow for her future use as she traveled down the long trail.

“Her father was Daniel Webster Parmley, son of Ezekiel Parmley of Kentucky. Rebecca Ann’s mother was Arys Murdon Parmley. The mother [Avis] with her sisters Mary, Nancy, Charita Ann and brother Edward Murdon were also from Kentucky.

“The Parmley, Murdon, Hyres, Boone, Will and Worthen families had come about 1830 from Kentucky and settled in rich bottom lands and on hills of Jackson County, Illinois, staying close to the creeks and rivers when possible.

“Daniel Parmley had his home on the banks of Big Muddy River between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge. It was a pretty spot for a home in this heavily timbered section, a few scattered meadows and the Kincaid Hills and Fountain Bluff nearby, with fertile sandy ridges for their garden and feed crops.

“Daniel Parmley built a tight, warm long home, with puncheon floors and Rebecca Ann could be kept very comfortable though she had arrived during a big snowstorm. Maybe that is the reason she still likes snow, though she is now content to just remember ‘Beautiful Snow’.

“When Rebecca Ann was about three years old [i.e., about 1850], an epidemic of typhoid fever broke out, which with malarial complications was the menace of the lowlands. She, with her sister and three brothers were very sick at the same time. Their mother cared for them day and night, but three of her children died, leaving only Rebecca and Harvey to comfort her parents, as they looked the last time on the three little ones, John, Sarah and Bob.

“Rebecca’s father decided to move his family to a healthier location further north, in the same county.

“Two years later [about 1852], when Rebecca was five years old, she had an attack of typhoid pneumonia and this time she was given up for dead and laid out in the ‘other room,’ and a messenger sent for a coffin. Her broken hearted father, mourning the loss of his daughter named for his two sisters (Rebecca and Ann), on removing the sheet from her face, detected signs of life and a feeble heart beat and overjoyed recalled the messenger. She was tenderly nursed back to health.

“Rebecca’s father, Daniel Parmley, had three sisters: Rebecca, who married Robert Worthen; Sarah, who married a Mr. Kirkendow; and Ann, who married William Hyres and at his death married James Plummer Watson. Daniel Parmley also had two brothers, Richard Parmley and Mathew Parmley.

“Her father purchased a farm, the deed to which was signed by President Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States.

“The father’s newly acquired farm in the higher part of the county had a fine stand of virgin pine, hickory, walnut and oak timber. Daniel and his partner, known to Rebecca only as ‘Dan’, cut logs and hauled them to the river, making it into rafts and floating them down the Mississippi river to New Orleans, Louisiana.

“It was a long journey. The return trip on flat boats was slow and tedious, but all was repaid by the well-filled bags of  silver they had received for the timber.

“Rebecca remembers welcoming the travelers and watching them divide the money, saying ‘This one for Dan, this one for Dan.’

“Also bright in her memory now are pictures of  the activities on that farm and the passing of the boats on the lower Big Muddy and Mississippi rivers (particularly the ones named, ‘Walk on the Water’ and ‘Silver Lake’). She also remembers walks with her father through the garden seeing ‘Love Apples’ (now known as tomatoes, but then considered rank poison) and she well remembers the time they shared their first tomato.

“In the meanwhile Mathew was born. A few years later, the father [Daniel Parmley], while away from home contracted pneumonia. The mother and three children on hearing of his sickness traveled overland by wagon and team, reaching him shortly before his death. He was buried in the Looney Springs burial ground, Jackson County, Illinois. [RESEARCH NOTE: Does anyone have a location in the cemetery or a photo of his tombstone? I visited there in about 2002, but could not find his grave. — SP]

“The widowed mother Arys Parmley left the farm, taking her three children, and lived with one of her brothers. Three years later the mother met Jacob McParegien, a widower with nine children. They fell in love as folks do. [Emphasis, mine. — SP]

“Rebecca’s little brother Harvey opposed the idea of any man taking his mother, and laid up a store of rocks, which he intended to use to chase the man away. But love won out.

“So Arys Parmley and Jacob McParegien were married and went to live on his farm nearby [emphasis mine, SP] where Rebecca and all the other eleven children helped their parents with the chores. One of the constant ones was to go down the hill a quarter of a mile to the spring to get water for the household uses.

“Rebecca could carry a full pail of water on her head and a full pail in each hand, the long path up hill from the spring. Perhaps that accounts for her erect carriage and fine poise to this day.

“The children carried corn and other feed to the hogs which were penned in, under an overhanging rock, which made a cave-like dry shelter.

“At night the children picked seed from the cotton bolls, each child having to fill one of his own shoes with seed each night. Lucky for Rebecca that her feet were tiny. They carded the cotton and spun it into thread. They also spun wool into yarn.

“Rebecca made the material which was woven into her first plaid dress of cotton and wool mixed, and the threads were dyed red, green, black and yellow.

“So their busy days hurried by until she was about thirteen years old, when the rumble of war was heard and all the young men and fathers, too, were called to the colors. [1861 — SP]  Then Rebecca and her half-sisters had to do the plowing, harvesting and all the rest of the hard work on the farm.

“Abraham Lincoln was now the President of the United States and had issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the Negro slaves. Many times the escaped run-away slaves appeared at the farmhouse.

“One time two of them had come to the smoke-house where the cured hams, bacon and other smoked meats were kept. One of the young lads in the family got his gun and with Rebecca at his side said he was going to ‘shoot that nigger’. Thrusting the gun through the wall, he was ready to shoot, when the Negro grabbed the gun and pulled it on through the wall and took it away with him, and the boy’s bravery suddenly melted into tears. The black men were harmless and only took two hams. Evidently they were too heavy, for they left one hanging on a tree near the farm.

“Rebecca’s step-father, Jacob McParagien [sic – SP], organized a company of soldiers and trained them for service, but he was denied the privilege of entering actual service on account of defective hearing.  [Emphasis mine — SP]

“While Rebecca was still in her early teens, her uncle and aunt, James P. Watson and Ann Parmley Watson, of Murphysboro, Illinois, invited her to come and make her home with them where there were better school advantages. She remained with them and their family, consisting of her cousins Bob, Mary, Carrie and Frankie, for many happy years.

“In the school she attended thee were two boys, John Haltwick and Don Ozburn, who did not like the grammar lessons. So when the time came to hear these classes, out through the window went the books, followed by the two boys, to the astonishment of the crippled school-master, Mr. McClarey, who crossed the room with the assistance of his faithful cane, and closed the window.

“About this time Rebecca commenced having her little love affairs, aided and abetted by her cousin Bob [Watson], who placed the ladder against the upstairs bedroom window and helped Beccy [sic – SP] escape to attend parties with him where she met and danced away the happy hours with the young soldier who afterward became her husband.

“Near the close of the Civil War the people of Murphysboro heard that a regiment of Union soldiers were to march through the town. Everyone was decorating their homes with flags and bunting, so Rebecca and her cousins thought they should do their patriotic bit. But in their home was a Confederate flag and Rebecca, not realizing the danger or the significance, waved the flag out an upper window. Her uncle [James P.] Watson, standing in the nearby courthouse door, where he was County Circuit Clerk, hastened home and disposed of the flag before the Union soldiers came by.

“While a young woman in the Watson home, she attended the Northern Methodist Church where she was converted and began the ‘Heavenly path that shineth more and more unto the Perfect Day’.

“When only seventeen, she had a class of younger girls in the Methodist Sunday School. She still can remember the names of them, Mary Butcher, Amelia Kennedy, Margaret Wilson and Anna Williams.

“When the Civil War was over and Rebecca twenty years of age, she was married to John Haltwick [on 30 March, 1867 in Jackson County, Illinois — Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, M731435, 1843-1879, 0968927  IT 2-3, Film]. And a very pretty picture she must have made with her curly black hair arranged into forty-two curls hanging down to her shoulders. The wedding dress was made of white swiss made with full skirt and full sleeves with a narrow band holding the fullness in at the hand.

“To them came four children, two boys and two girls. The two little boys were taken back into Heaven, one at two years of age, the other at fifteen months.

“The little girls, Ada and Carrie [born in 1875], grew to womanhood. The older one, Ada, passed away May 20, 1900. Carrie [Haltwick] Pigott is living today [1940] , in Murphysboro, Illinois.

“On April 20, 1877, after a married life of only ten years, Mr. Haltwick died. Rebecca was left a widow with two little daughters.

“In those days women were not trained to make their own way as they now are. So Rebecca, very well trained in the homemaking art, turned her hand to dress making and other things she could find to do.

“She was hostess in the town’s public library or reading room as it was known in those days. There she met Mr. Sion R. Caudel, a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the son of a Tennessee Baptist preacher. A few years later they were married. To them were born three children: Ida, Bob and Birdie Caudel.

“Life went on with its varied interests and tasks, such as housekeeping, tending babies, washing necks and ears, wiping bloody noses, wrapping up stubbed toes, kissing cut fingers, patching skinned shins and all the other joys of motherhood.

“She sent them to school and took them to Methodist Sunday School and sat with them in the pew at the Sunday morning service, at the same time serving four years as a Stewardess in the Church, an honored position.

“Again the Grim Reaper reached out his sickle for the ripened grain and the husband and father was gathered into the fold of the Redeemer above.

“One more Rebecca with faith and courage took up the burden and carried it cheerfully and well. Until one day the postman brought a letter from the Golden West, from her son Bob [Caudel], in Los Angeles, containing a railroad ticket and Pullman reservations and an invitation to ‘come up and see us sometime.’ She came, she saw, she conquered.

“That was twenty-six years ago. Today she is very happy to greet you, each and every one, on this occasion of  her ninety-third birthday, February 1st, 1940.”

The 1930 Federal Census states that Rebecca A. Caudel was living with her son, Robert W. Caudel and his wife Frances, in Los Angeles, Calif. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel died in California in about 1941 at the age of 94, we think. [RESEARCH NOTE: No record for her in the California Death Record index.]

According to the California Death Records, Robert Watson Caudel was born in Missouri on 2 June, 1881. He died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 20 Sept., 1950 at age 71. His wife, Frances Caudel, was born 23 Feb., 1876 in Kansas. She died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 25 Oct., 1950 at age 74.

  1. William Harvey Parmley

William Harvey Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in June, 1845 in Missouri. He married in about 1879 to Ellen _________________.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Clay Pearigen.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census also lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34 year old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22 year old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

[NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William R. Parmley, son of William H. Parmley.]

  1. Matthew Parmley

Matthew Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in Feb., 1853. He married Carrie ________________. Lillian Paregien Hughes said that Matthew  was blind.

Jacob and his second wife and their large number of children lived on his farm. They hauled water to the house from a spring about one-quarter of a mile away.

 

CHILDREN BORN TO

JACOB  &  AVIS PAREGIEN

Jacob and Avis Paregien went on to have four children of their own (That made a total of 14 children sired by Jacob Paregien). Their four children were:

  1. Nancy Paregien

Nancy Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien, in about 1858, probably in Jackson County, Illinois. [See family photo: 1892-02.]

At age 16 she  married Anton (or Antoine) Guion (age 21) on 14 Oct., 1874 in St. Louis, Ill. by  Charles Picken, Justice of the Peace. Official witnesses were C.W. Guion and Lizzie Smith. [Marriage Index of St. Louis County. The marriage was filed and recorded on 29 Dec., 1874].  He definitely was of French heritage, as there are lots of Guion’s in Canada and France.

In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census the above three children were living with their grandparents, Jacob & Avis Paregien, at Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

The children were listed, with an error in spelling, as  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). The correct spelling of their last name is “Guion”.

1880--03--B -- Nancy Paregien Guion - daughters May and Maud Guion

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion and daughters and an unidentified child. Date unknown. [Photo 1880-03]

1898--03 Nancy Paregien Guion-family

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion with family (and son-in-law??). Date unknown. [Photo 1898-03]

1898-02-NancyParegienGuion--StLouis

I’m a little confused about this photo. Taken in about 1898 (??), the label I put on it in about 1973 says it “shows (l to r) Nancy Paregien Guion (daughter of Jacob & Avis Paregien) and her mother Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien. The woman on the right is Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion.  [Photo 1898-02]”. Now, I don’t know if that is correct. Instead, I belived the woman on the left is May Guion and the woman in the center is May’s mother, Nancy Paregien Guion. At first, I thought maybe the woman on the right was May’s sister, Maud. However, looking at the two previous photos of the sisters, they appear to be about the same height . . . but the woman at right in this photo is considerably shorter than May Guion. So she may indeed be Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion. That’s my best guess.

One source indicates that Antoine Guion was born in 1853 and his parents were Barthelmi Guion and Marguerite Barada. [http://www.stlgs.org/efdb/d238.htm#P27037 ]. This Mr. Guion’s age would be about right. [There was a much older Antoine Guion born in 1832 in Carondelet, St. Louis, Missouri. His father or maybe an uncle??]

Nancy and Mr. Guion had at least three children:  May Guion, Maud Guion and Thomas Guion.

Melvin L. Pearigen wrote me in on 30 April, 1973 and said: “I was through St. Louis in 1922. Her [“Aunt Nancy’] and her husband, he’s a Frenchman by the name of Guion, . . . owned a rooming house and was selling it to buy a chicken ranch near Springfield, Missouri. And that’s the last I ever heard of them.”

The St. Louis City Directory for 1880 lists Antoine Guion as a gardener (or a guard; “ard.”) and living on 4th Street near Fillmore.  We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien. Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced or simply were not listed?

The 1900 U.S. Federal Census shows Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion) living in Township 3, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (Atoka County, Okla.). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).

Thomas C. Guion had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

His wife was Lula M. ________ Guion, age 18. She was  born  in Sept., 1881, in  Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1905 lists one “Nannie Guion” living at 1401 Chauteau Ave. Could this “Nannie” be our Nancy?

1910--04 HenryPearigen-OllieGuion Family

In the photo above, Henry Pearigen stands between his brother-in-law, Anton Guion, and his sister, Nancy Paregien Guion [Photo 1910-04]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The 1930 U.S. Federal Census shows a Thomas Guion, age 51,  living with his wife, Lula Guion in the Independent City section of St. Louis (St. Louis County), Missouri. He was born to Antoine Guion & Nancy Paregien Guion in about 1879.

NOTE: A certain “Filbert Antoine Guion” died in Lincoln County, Missouri on 17, June, 1903. He had been born about 1854 in Missouri. [Source: Lincoln County, Missouri Deaths: 1866-1896, an online database created by Kenneth E. Weant.] 

 

  1. Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (later “Paregine”)

Doug Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, on 31 May, 1861 at Murphysboro (Jackson County, Illinois). 

Like his full-brother, Henry Clay Paregien,  Doug began using an alternate spelling of the family name. And while Henry spelled it “Pearigen” Doug spelled it  “Paregine.”  The big unanswered question is this: why they would take on such spellings, even when living close to other relatives who maintained the original spelling? Strange, indeed.

Apparently Jacob and Avis Paregien must have been impressed by Illinois politician and U.S. Senator Stephen Arnold Douglas so much so that they named their second child after him. It makes one wonder whether they ever heard the famous Senator speak in person. He debated his little-known Republican opponent Abraham Lincoln in many cities across Illinois in 1858 for the U.S. Senate seat. Douglas won that contest, but Lincoln beat him for the job of President of the United States in 1860.

Were the Paregiens registered Democrats?

The Phelps County, Missouri Marriage Book  lists one  “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he wed her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

  1. Mary A. Paregien

Mary A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien, in about 1864, near the end of the Civil War. This Mary Paregien is not to be confused with the Mary Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien.

The 1880 Census for Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri has Mary A. Paregien as age 16 and living with their mom and dad, Jacob and Avis Paregien.

Mary A. Paregien married Columbus F. Richardson, age 23, on 19 Jan., 1883. Jonathan Harrison, a Justice of Peace in Rolla, Missouri performed the ceremony. Columbus Richardson was from West Plains (Howell County), Missouri. The record states “J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”(Phelps County Missouri Marriages, Book 3, p. 092).

As it turns out, Columbus Richardson is a very common name in the United States. And often the Census records show that the so-named person of a Black or Mulatto. In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census there was a Columbus Richardson (age 70, born about 1860 in Missouri) living in the Kansas City (Jackson County), Missouri area as a boarder.

  1. Henry Clay Paregien (later “Pearigen”)

Henry Clay Paregien  was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien in St. Louis, Missouri on 4 Aug., 1867 (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. It was addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky [far southwest Kentucky]).

For some unknown reason, Henry spelled his last name as “Pearigen”. So there is now an entire line of the family spelling it that way. And there are a great number of other folks, who may or may not be related, who spell their name that way (lots of them in Tennessee and Kentucky).

And to just make it more confusing, Henry Clay Paregien’s full-brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien, also started using a variant spelling of the last name — and it was even different from the one Henry used! Doug Paregien became Doug “Paregine”.

 

______________ Miscellaneous Notes ________________

Lillian Paregien Hughes told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that she remembered seeing her grandmother Avis Paregien. She said that Avis smoked a pipe, and she swept the floors with a short-handled broom, which she had to stoop to use. Lillian also recalled seeing her wash their clothes. They had a tree stump which they would beat their clothes on, after soaking them, to get them clean. She wore her hair slicked back in a knot.

In later life, Avis lived with her son, Henry Clay Pearigen, at Wapanucka (Johnston County), Okla.

On 1 March, 1859, there was a “James Parigen” of Iron County, Missouri who purchased 120 acres of land at or near Jackson (Cape Giradeau County), Missouri. The official land description was: The south half of the SE quarter and the NE quarter of the SE quarter of Section 22, in Township 32N of R4E, in the District of Sands.” This land is located only about 30 miles from the Paregien home base of Murphysboro (Jackson County), Illinois.  Was this our James A. Paregien, who would have turned 18 on 21 March, 1859?

1860

The 8th Census of the United States, done in 1860, for Jackson County, Illinois shows two Paregien-related families living in Township 8, Range 3W.

  1. William H. “Paragen” – #748 listing — a day laborer, age 23, born in Missouri. Also lists a female named Huldy Paragen, age 21, born in Illinois. Also lists Eliza J Paragen, born in Illinois and her age shown as “8/12”, meaning she was only 8 months of age. William H. Paregien was the eldest son of Jacob and his first wife, Nancy (or “Nanley”) Morgan, born on Nov. 23, 1837. Apparently he was living in his own home, with his wife and a child. [RESEARCH NOTE: Is there a birth certificate available in Missouri? ]
  2. Jacob “Paragen” – #749 listing — a farmer, age 44, born in Kentucky and married to Arris (or perhaps, “Avis”; hard to read the writing) Paragen”, age 34, born in Kentucky. Others living in that household included Jacob’s children by his first wife :(a) James Paragen – age 19, born in Ill; (b) Elizabeth Paragen – age 14, born in Missouri; (c) Sarah – age 10, born in Missouri; (d) Samuel – age 8, born in Illinois; and (e) Nancy – age 2, born in Illinois. It also included the children of his second wife “Erris” (or Aryns or Avis) — (a) William H. Parmlee – age 15, born in Missouri; (b) Rebecca Parmlee – age 12, born in Missouri; and (c) Matthew Parmlee – age 5, born in Illinois. And then there was a man living with them named Tobias Penrod, age 75, born in Pennsylvania.[Who the heck was he? ]

During the Civil War, Jacob M. Paregien organized a trained a company of soldiers for the Union Army. However, he was so hard of hearing that he himself could not enlist. His son, James Alexander Paregien, did join the service.

There is, however, a record of one “Jacob Peargin” (also spelled “Pergin”) being in the 7th Missouri Infantry, serving as a Private in Company G. (Box 000390, Extraction 0037)

The Military Census of 1862 for Jackson County recorded two Union soldiers who hailed from Levan Township (Town 8 South, Range 3 West):   (1)  William Perigan, age 27, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 81st Regiment; and (2) James Perigan, age 22, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 27th Regiment.

1865  –  End of the Civil War between the northern states and the southern states.

1868  –   The approximate year when Jacob Mac Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien moved to St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

Louise E. Paregien,  one of  the daughters of Jacob & Nancy Paregien, married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869. [Her name may also be read as “Louisa E. Pariagein”]

   ________________________   End of Part 2  of 3  ____________________

Oh, hey, a couple of other things.

I am now publishing a free newsletter titled “An Encouraging Word.” It is a periodic publication, sent only once or twice a month. Our goal: “To share positive ideas and to encourage acts of kindness.” To be added to my mailing list, just write to me at paregien@gmail.com and in the subject line put “Encouraging Word.” Easy, huh?

Also, my most recent music video can be found online at YouTube. After I read how the Boy Scouts organization (reeling from large membership losses) was mounting an agressive campaign to recruit Girl Scout employees, troop leaders and girls. So I sat down and wrote a song titled, “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts.” It is at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-_iMT3rPgk

Thanks.

 

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Issue 365 – Jacob Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 365  –  October 12, 2017

 

Jacob Mac Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

Paregien, Jacob M - no exiting photo -- maybe looking something like this in about 1866

 

 How Jacob might have looked at about age 50.

Introduction

I compiled the first Paregien Family History and published it in February of 1974. There were only a few people who were really involved besides me. That small number included my mom, Evelyn Paregien, my sister, Roberta Fournier, and Melvin Pearigen, Jewel Paregien Smith and Eura Paregien. That was about it. And those last three have been gone a long time now.

Thankfully, there were others who stepped up this time and gave me a hand. I especially want to thank Marie Paregien Walker, Roberta Paregien Fournier, Jan Harris Warner, Sandra Paregien Dudley, Marie Clark Palm, Amanda Pearigen, Kathy Peargin, Shirley Paregien Barrett and Clayton Moorman.

Are there typographical errors in this history? Are there factual errors in it? Do some families have much more material than others? Could it have been organized differently? Could it have been printed as a hardbound book rather than sold in the CD format?

Well, the answer to all those questions is “Yes”. And not just “Yes,” but “Heck, yes!”

The organization, final typing and editing has been a one-person project of monumental proportion. And I accept the blame for any errors or typos.

As to the format, I would welcome anyone who has deep pockets and wants to step up and put up the money to have it published as a standard book. But not many of us could afford something that would cost well over $150 each copy. So I chose to do it this way. Each person can print out the entire CD and put it in two or three three-ring binders, thus having a nice and quite functional copy. Or one may take it to a print shop and have them print it out and give it a professional binding and, . . . shazam! . . . , have a real book. Or some may choose to just print out the section dealing with their particular branch of the family. There is great flexibility, so it is your choice.

As to some families having much more material in the book than others, the fact is that some families simply donated more information and more photos than others did. Some lines did not provide any information or photos at all. None. Nada. Zip. So the minimum information that is contained here was all I could find. My goal all along was to be as inclusive as possible.  And it is.

Deciding how to organize this history was a much more difficult task than you might first think. After much consideration, it seemed to me that the best way to organize this book would be to first present the history of our patriarch, Jacob Mac Paregien, and his  thirteen (yes, 13) biological children and three stepchildren in the first section, called “Our Roots”. The remaining individuals and/or families then will follow in alphabetical order by their legal names at birth. So that is what I have done.

You will see markers such as [2001-027] in the captions next to most of the photographs and illustrations. That is simply my personal method of indexing my large collection of photographs and graphics. When the date in the caption does not match the date of the marker, the date in the caption is most reliable.

It may be helpful for you to start this history by studying the Overview, at the end of this section. That will help you to see how the different “pieces” or families fit together.  

Folks, this is about it for me. I have put much of my life into collecting information and photos of the Paregien family. It has been a rewarding and satisfying experience, but it has consumed about enough of my time and energy. There are other things in life that I still want to do.

So with this book I am passing the torch to whoever has the interest and the dedication and the love of history to take up the challenge. I’ll be glad to help those who have questions, but what you see in print here is virtually everything that I know about the family. And when I don’t work with the information regularly, it sure fades fast.

Finally, I want to dedicate this book to three very important and special women in my life: my wife and best friend, Peggy Allen Paregien;  my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling; and my sister, Roberta Paregien Fournier.

Happy reading,

Stan Paregien

March 1, 2006

Part 1:    1816  to  1857

It is thought that Jacob Mac Paregien was born on April 12, 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. We do not know the names of his parents. Jacob stated in a U.S. Federal Census for 1880 that his father was from Ireland and his mother from South Carolina.      [With the publication of this history in 2006, I am passing the genealogical torch to the next generation. Perhaps they can trace our roots back to our European origin. –SP]

The 1860 U.S. Census of Jackson County, Ill., listed Jacob “Paragen” (age 44) and married as having been born in Kentucky. But the family tradition, at least for the Frank Paregien branch and the Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine branch,  is that Jacob was born in Northern Ireland and came to the U.S. as a stowaway at the age of 14 (about 1830).

The Family Search Ancestral File (ID # 10511984) says that “Jacob M. Paregin” was born in 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. Please be advised that you will find the name Paregien spelled 50 different ways, due to the particular writer’s indifference or literacy.

The major town, today, in Warren County is Bowling Green (the county seat). Ironically, in 1962-63 Stan Paregien traveled to Bowling Green, Kentucky from Nashville every Sunday for about a year. He preached for a little country congregation, Mars Hill Church of Christ, outside of Bowling Green. He had no idea, back then, that he was near the birthplace of his great-great-grandfather.

Map -- Bowling Green, KY -- 2017

Warren county was formed in 1797. It is located in the Pennyrile and Western coal field regions of the state. The elevation in the county ranges from 395 to 955 feet above sea level.

Nancy Baird wrote this of  Bowling Green (Warren County), Kentucky: “In 1821 the Bank of the Commonwealth established a branch office on the square and by 1827 the town boasted a locally owned newspaper, a resident physician, a private school for boys (a school for girls opened in the Presbyterian Church in the mid 1820s), a Masonic lodge, at least one church, two tiny hotels, a number of mercantile shops and an array of other business establishments. Most structures housing a commercial venture also served as a residence for the owner. The courthouse provided meeting space for congregations without buildings and numerous rural log structures provided space for both school and church meetings. A stagecoach line connecting Bowling Green to Louisville, Nashville and Hopkinsville rumbled into town three times a week to discharge and pick up the mail and passengers. The round trip between Bowling Green and Louisville (180 miles) took three days and cost $12.

“From its inception Warren County’s residents depended on the Barren River as an avenue for commerce. In the winter when the river was high, flatboats loaded with tobacco, ham, whiskey and other farm produce began the arduous trip from a warehouse on the river’s edge to New Orleans. The flatboat journey down river and return by wagon or on foot (steamboats did not paddle up the Mississippi and Ohio until after 1814) required about six months. Goods not produced locally came by wagon from Louisville or Nashville on roads that were little better than an animal path, an erratic and expensive mode of freighting.

“After the advent of the steamboat on the Ohio River, local businessmen urged that the narrow, winding, snag-filled Green and Barren rivers be improved sufficiently for steamboats to ascend to Bowling Green. Without such river trade, warned a newspaper editor, “we can never be independent or prosperous.” Discussions and delays followed but eventually a company of young volunteers cleared the worst snags and overhanging trees. In January 1828 a tiny, single stack steamboat, the United States, arrived at Bowling Green and its cargo of a few boxes of sugar, tea, coffee and other items was unloaded and displayed on the riverbank. A local miss later recalled that she could not believe that so much could ever be consumed by the town’s residents.

“During the 1830s the state authorized improvements on the Green and Barren and eventually provided for the construction of locks and dams. On the completion of these projects, paddle wheelers could ply upriver to the Bowling Green boat landing.” (from A HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY)

1840

Jacob Paregien was living near Murphysboro in Jackson County, Ill., when the 1840 census was taken. He may have bought land in Section 31, W/SE sometime prior (Saline Land Grant). That record, taken by Dr. John Logan,, lists “Jacob Peregin” and a white female as living in “Township 7 — Ora”. There is an “Ora” township just north of the “Oraville” community on the Jackson County map.

Murphysboro, IL - Welcome sign - 2017

Welcome sign for Murphysboro, Illinois

Murphysboro, IL - map of Illinois with star on Murphysboro

Map of Illinois, with Myrphysboro at the bottom.

Map -- Murphysboro in Jackson County, IL and surrounding area

Map of the region around Jackson County, Illinois

Map -- Jackson County, IL                               Map of Jackson County, Illinois with Myrphysboro as the County Seat   

Dr. John Logan donated twenty acres of land for a new county seat in Murphrysboro, Jackson County, Ill., in August of 1843.

Jacob M. Paregien’s first marriage was to Nancy Morgan (born 9 April, 1821 or 1822  in Warren County, Kentucky). Her father was  Robert H. Morgan and he was born 19 March, 1786 in North Carolina. Robert Morgan  married Hannah Moyers Myers on  5 Feb., 1812 in Warren County, Kentucky. She had been born about 1794 in Tenn. The web site of Warren County Genealogical Society has her name spelled as “Hanniah Mires,” but the date is the same (http://www.burgoo.com/). Robert Morgan died in September, 1855 in Jackson County, Ill.

Nancy Morgan’s siblings were: Margaret Morgan (born 1826 in Kentucky), Martha Jane Morgan (born 25 Feb., 1825 in Warren County, Ken.; died 13 Sept., 1948 in Jackson County, Ill.)

Jacob and Nancy (Morgan) Paregien had nine children. We only have a photo of one of these nine children, James A. Paregien.

  1. William H. Paregien

William H. Paregien was born 23 Nov., 1837 . He was born in Missouri, according to the 1840 U.S. Census for Jackson County, Ill.  He married Huldah McCann on 11 Jan., 1859. — Jackson County Illinois Marriages: 1857-1866, p. 27).

(Also: See the information below on the 1860 Census, below, which states that at age 23 he was living with his wife, “Huldy” and daughter Elizabeth in Jackson County).

On 21 Sept., 1852, William Paregien bought 40.12 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W. Then on 30 Sept., 1852 William Paregien bought .12 acres of land for $1.25 in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

28 Jan., 1876   –   A 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

  1. James Alexander Paregien

James Alexander Paregien was born 21 March, 1841 in Murphysboro, Ill. (State of birth so noted in the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Ill.).

See more under a separate listing for James A. Paregien in Chapters 4-8.

  1. Mary Jane Paregien

Mary Jane Paregien was born 24 June, 1844. At the tender age of 14, she married James Ward on 25 Nov., 1858. (Marriages Index, Jackson County Courthouse, p. 37).

The 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows a Mary Ward, born in Illinois in 1844, married to a John Ward (blacksmith). That may or may not be our Mary Jane Paregien Ward.

It is important not to confuse this Mary Paregien, born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien, with the Mary A. Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien.

  1. Emily Elizabeth Paregien

She was born 30 Dec., 1845 in Missouri (according to the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois).The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin“, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township.

It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township.

[The 1870 Census for Lauderdale, Alabama (Township 2, Range 8) lists an Eliza Peregin, age 36, born in 1833 in Alabama. It also lists a Nancy Peregin, age 1, born in 1868 in Alabama as living in the same Township.]

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien, age 27,  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien) was married to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

There is no listing for them anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census that I can find. Both the names Richard Connell and Elizabeth Connell are very common.

  1. Sarah A. Paregien

Sarah A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien on 10 March, 1849 (??) in Missouri (according to 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois). There is no mention of her in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, anywhere.

There is no mention of a Sarah A. Paregien anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, when her father and stepmother and several siblings were living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. She would have been 31 years of age then.

  1. Robert H. Paregien

Robert H. Paregien was born 24 March, 1849 in Jackson County, Ill. He died in 1857 at about age 8. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has his name as Robert F. Paregin.

  1. Louise E. Paregien

Louise (or perhaps Louisa) E. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien  on 26 Dec., 1851. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has her first name as Louisa and says she was born in 1853 in Jackson County, Ill.

She married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869.

  1. Samuel M. Paregien

Samuel M. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien on 10 Feb., 1853. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has him born in 1855 in Jackson County, Ill. The 1910 U.S. Federal Census has him born in 1852

One source says Samuel died 4 May, 1864, but I don’t think that is correct. Can a dead man get married? Perhaps. Or, more likely, he really did not die in 1864. There was a Samuel Paregien who married Mary C. Davis (Index to Female Marriages, Jackson County Marriages, Book 2, 121).

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for his father,  “J.M. Paregien

However, the 1880 U.S. Census shows Samuel Paregien, age 26, living with his parents and other relatives in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

In 1907 there was a Samuel Paregien who owned land in Kincaid Township, IS, Range 4W of the 3rd PM, Block 24. The land is west of Kincaid Lake (The lake is man-made and was not there in those days) and is now owned by the U.S. Forest Service.

The 1910 United States Federal Census for Jackson County shows Samuel M. Paregien, age 57 (born in 1852 in Illinois), as living in Kincaid Township.

There is a  Sam Perigen  listed as buried in the Kincaid Cemetery.

  1. Thomas J. Paregien

Thomas J. Paregien was the final child born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien. He was born 20 Nov., 1854 in Jackson County, Ill. Could his full name have been Thomas Jefferson Paregien? It was common to name children after presidents or prominent people. Thomas J. Paregien died at age four, on 21 Feb., 1859, probably in Jackson County, Illinois.

___________

 

The 1830 Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows that there were only 86 white residents in the county who were over 50 years of age. The life span was not that great, back then. There were a total of 1,768 white residents and 62 black residents.

The 1840 Census Record taken by Dr. John Logan lists a “Jacob Peregin” and a white female in Jackson County, Illinois (Township 7 – Ora; sheet 11). This document was found at www.rootsweb.com/~iljackson/1840.html. There is a community north of Murphysboro named Oraville.

The 1850 U.S. Census Record shows Arys Parmley being married to Daniel, in the Jacksonville area [My sister, Robert Paregien Fournier, found this entry]

The web site for Illinois Land Purchases shows that Jacob “McParegien” bought a parcel of “Federal sale” land in a sale dated 28 April, 1853. And he bought another on 30 April, 1853.  The April 30 document says it was a Federal sale in which he bought .38 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NESW, Range 02W, for $1.25.  Jacob Paregien is also listed as “Jacob M. Paragin” (Township 7S, Range 2W,  Sec 31 WSE) and as Jacob “Peregin”.

On 26 Feb., 1855 “Jacob McParigren” was listed in a probate hearing as the executor of the will for a Mr. Samuel Perry (will on file at Southern Illinois University Library, File 1775).

It was on 3 Nov., 1855 that the probate of the will of  Daniel Parmlee was filed (File #1777), with the executor being Jesse W. Ward.  This was, no doubt, Daniel Parmley, the deceased husband of  Avis Parmley ( She then became Jacob Paregien’s second wife).

Jacob’s first wife , Nancy Morgan Paregien, died on 19 Dec., 1856 (just one year after her father died). Probably in Jackson County, Illinois.  [RESEARCH NOTE: Where is she buried?]

Overview

 Jacob M. Paregien & Nancy Morgan had 9 children (listed chronologically):

          William H. Paregien

          James A. Paregien 

          Mary Jane Paregien

          Emily Elizabeth Paregien

          Sarah A. Paregien

          Robert H. Paregien

          Louise E. Paregien

          Samuel M. Paregien

          Thomas J. Paregien

Jacob M. Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, had 4 children:

          Nancy Paregien

          Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (changed his name to PAREGINE)  

          Mary A. Paregien

          Henry Clay Paregien (changed his name to PEARIGEN)

 

James A. Paregien (son of Jacob) and Harriet Brummett had 9 children:

            Hariett E. Paregien

            James Edward “Bud” Paregien

            George Walter Paregien

            Emey Evaline Paregien

            Jefferson Mac (“Jeff”) Paregien

            William Marion (“Will”) Paregien

            Alruettir Paregien

            Nancy Paregien

            Benjamin Franklin (“Frank”) Paregien

Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob) married Anton “Ollie” Guion and had 3 children:

            May Guion

            Maud Guion

            Thomas Guion

 

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine* (son of Jacob) married Celia Lowe and they had one child:

            Edd Paregine

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine and his 2nd wife, Mollie Mary Brooks Payne, had 3 children:

            Lillian Mary Paregine

            William Mack Paregine

            Grace Olive Paregine

Henry Clay Pearigen (son of Jacob) married Sarah Evangeline Taylor and they had 5 children:

            Eldora Pearigen

            Bird McKinley Pearigen

            Melvin L. Paregien

            Girl who died in infancy

            Another child

 

James Edward “Bud” Paregien married Julie Copeland and they had 1 child:

            William Reece Paregien (he began spelling his name as PEARGIN). He

                     married Lulu Lawson and they had 5 children:

            Marvin Peargin

            Douglas Peargin

            Orie Peargin

            William Olan Peargin

            Creda Peargin

            Richard Odell Peargin

James Edward Paregien and his 2nd wife had 1 and possibly 2 children:

            Bertha Paregien

            Warner (or maybe William) Paregien (??)

 Part 1 of 3 

 

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Issue 356 – Joy of Aging & Other Lies

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The Paregien Journal  –  www.paregien.com  –  Issue 356  –  July 6, 2017

The Joy of Aging & Other Lies

Okay, buckeroos and buckerettes, make sure your butt is firmly planted on your saddle and your boots are in your stirrups, and your age-spotted hands and arthritic fingers have a firm grip on your horse’s reins. We are about to take a ride down memory lane.

Only this won’t be your Grandma’s memory lane about all the veggies she and Grandpa used to gather from their big garden out back and how she “canned ’em” (i.e., pressure cooked them and put  them in quart jars) and stacked in the basement to be enjoyed some cold day in January. It is not about Grandpa’s musings about how unusually large the fish were that he used to catch in just a few hours at the lake. Nope, none of that stuff.

This little essay is about the here and now, about what a short time it took we old geezers to get from wherever we neaked through high school to the place far away where we live and how things have changed 360 degrees from then to right now. 

So I’ll say like they do on cable TV just before reporting on some awful story, “A fair warning. The content of this next report might be upsetting to some.” Yeah, right. Like to 99.9 percent of people with at least half-way functioning brain matter.

Let’s start with this little book:

1,003 Great Things About Getting Older

Birnbach, Lisa et al - 1,003 Great Things About Getting Older -- 1997 by MJF Books -- front cover

My wife Peggy, otherwise known as the World’s Greatest Optimist (aka “sweet thing”) gave me this little book a while back. I thought it was a joke book. You know, it says “1,003 Great Things About Getting Older” but you open it up and the pages are blank. Sorta like that one “Everything Your Daddy Told You About Women But You Forgot.” But, no, this one actually has pages filled with stuff.

Lisa Birnbach, Ann Hodgman, Patricia Mars and David Owen had their fingers in the pie when it came to compiling these gems of politically correct wisdom. So here are a few sayings to help you get through your first cup of coffee. My comments are in the brackets.

**** It doesn’t take so long for summer to come again. [Not a good thing here in Florida — SP]

****  You’ve paid off your student loans [unless you’re a doctor or a lawyer — SP]

****  You receive mail every day, even if it’s only catalogs and bills. [Yeah, and most of the catalogs are from nursing homes and hearing aide companies. — SP]

****  Your arthritis makes you less likely to lose your wedding ring. [Wrong. I lost mine while frolicking at the beach. “Flrolicking” at my age means wading knee-deep in the water when it is still cool (70’s) to avoid shock to the part of my anatomy which actually probably needss shock treatment — SP]

****  All moral issues are conveniently black and white. [Right. Except those which are not — SP]

****  Weekends suddenly have meaning. [Hey, weekends slip in and out like a thief in the night. I stopped wearing a wristwatch when I retired. Now that we’ve been retired in Florida for four years, I’m also gonna give up my calendar — SP]

****  Dental implants let you eat corn on the cob, again. [Thanks, but I was robbed by my last two dentists. So I’ll just sip soup through a straw. — SP]

****  By age 74, refilling the bird feeder is a good morning’s work. [That or changing a flat bicycle tire. — SP]

****  By age 88 you can still identify half the people in your photo albums. [Ah, ha. Got you there. I have converted most all of our photos to digital images, complete with the names and locations of the subjects. That is what has kept me out of the pool halls most of my life. And most of ’em — well over 13,000 — are stored not only on my computer but also online on my FLICKR account which has 1 Terrabyte of storage — SP]

****  By age 100, all your enemies are dead.

****  A  little sex goes a long way. [Darn it, speak up. Your little grandson Rex does what? — SP]

****  People get out of your way when you drive down the street. [Only the smart ones. — SP]

Men Will Understand This One

All Too Well

 

Medical - prostate_exam_ 04sign_100dpi

My cousin Jerry R. Paregien is my favorite patriot-in-exile from California. He and his wife have lived about 20 years now on a mountain outside of Kingsport, Tennessee. From their back balcony, they can look across a wide valley and see the beautiful Clinch Mountains of Virginia on the horizon to the north.

Like Steve Martin, Jerry is a wild and crazy guy. Though he is showing early signs of  . . .  eh, . . . dement- . . . eh, . . .  Alzhei . . . something or other, Why, that Prune Picker still remembers every joke he ever heard and delivers each punch like with vim and vigor. Actually, I don’t know whether he remembers any of those “farmer’s daughter and the salesman” jokes from our teenage years, but if he does he ain’t admitting to it.

Boys, now what I’m about to tell you is the gospel truth. ‘Cause I heard it directly from my ‘Cuz. And pert near everything he tells me is resonably precise. 

Medical - prostate exam -- 03 - doctor smiling

Jerry told me that a couple of years or so ago, his appointment with his doctor for his annual physical rolled around. When they called his name from the cattle corral (waiting room), one of their nurses took him aside and took his weight and vital signs (yes, he still has some). And she escorted him to the Great Waiting Room down the hall where he twittled his thumbs for 15 or 20 minutes.

Finally, the doctor came in and they exchanged pleasantries. The doc checked his chart and his medications and declared him not-exactly-brain-dead. Said he seemed to be in mite near perfect condition for an old man with not long to live on Mother Earth. 

Then the doc began to stammer and stutter and finally got out these dreaded few words that send a chill up the spine of any red-blooded American male. He said, “Well, Jerry, stand up, turn around  and drop your pants and BVD’s to your knees. Time for me to check where the sun don’t shine.”

Medical -- prostate exam -- DR - 'I don't enjoy them either'

Jerry turned his head around, as much as his arthritis would allow, and looked his doc in the face and said in his professional, deadpan comedian way: “Well, Dr. Jones, I should darn well hope you’re going to check my prostate. I didn’t wash my butt today, like this, for just anybody.”

When the doctor finally quit laughing, and after visiting that Dark Domain, he said to my ‘Cus: “Jerry, for years now I have kept a log of funny things that my clients say to me. You will be pleased to know that your comments will go down in history.”

Medical - prostate exam -- 02 - using a baseball glove

NOTE: The above cartoon is especially for my two old friends, Bob L’Huillier (Bradenton, FL) and Victor Knowles (Joplin, MO), who are devoted baseball fans. 

Carter, Jimmy -- The Virtues of Aging -- 1998 - NY Ballentine Publishing - page 01 - front coverCarter, Jimmy -- The Virtues of Aging -- 1998 - NY Ballentine Publishing - page 02 - back cover

Now surely all of you, well maybe not you young ‘un’s under 50 or so, remember ol’ Jimmy Carter, long-time peanut farmer from Plains, Georgia. He was born there on Oct. 1, 1924.

Now my Grandpa Paregien was a “yellow-dog” Democrat until his dying breath. Somehow I went down the Republican path. But I came through the wringer of the Hippie Years and the Anti-Vietnam War Years. So I did my own thing and I castigated my first vote for a Democrat when I voted for Jimmy Carter. I mean, gee whiz, after all the duds we’d had before, I felt we just couldn’t go wrong voting for a certified man of the soil, a tried and true peanut farmer. After all, a distant relative of mine — Johnny Walters of Wapanucka, Oklahoma–was “Peanut Farmer of the Year” one time in Johnston County.

Well, I’d admit I was wrong about that premise and have made two or maybe three fair-to-middlin’ mistakes since then. But how the heck was I to know that he was also an expert on atomic submarines and other useless stuff like that. Ignorance is often bliss, and I was in la-la-land that day I voted for Mr. Carter.

Shootfire, ol’ Jimmy was a sure ’nuff nice guy. He even taught a Sunday morning Bible class almost everywhere in the world he happened to be, and still teaches his “Adults 101” Bible Class today in Plains (they call it 101 because that’s about the average age of the class members). But even nice guys don’t necessarily make good presidents. Of course, comparing him to Donald J. Trump today I have to say that ol’ peanut farmer looks better and better.

Do you remember Jimmy Carter’s dear, free-spirited momma? Lillian Gordy Carter often shot from her lip, saying just whatever she wanted to say whether it was approved by the Southern Baptist Convention or by the Geneva Convention either one. She was a corker to be sure. And then there was Jimmy’s junior brother, good ol’ Bubba — no, wait a minute, it was Billy. Billy Carter, whose only claim to fame was getting his name on some beer cans — “Billy Beer.” They didn’t serve it in finer restaurants back then, but you might have been able to get one out in Luckenbach, Texas.

But I digress, as I’m prone to do.

Here are some of President Carter’s words of wisdom about the virtues of growing old. He is still a Card-Carrying Baptist so I hope the Lord will excuse him for stretching-the-blanket a bit” (as the old-time cowboys used to refer to any cowpoke who stretched the truth). Keep in mind this remarks are from his 1998 book, noted above.

“Even before leaving the White House, Rosalynn and I received a notice from the American Association of Retired Persons that we were qualified for membership, but we considered ourselves too young to face the stigma of senior citizenship. However, once back in Plains [Georgia, population 700 — SP] the point was to be driven home most firmly and clearly.

“We live 120 miles south of Atlanta and habitually drive back and forth toThe Carter Center and to Emory University, where I am a professor. One morning we left our house quite early and stopped to eat breakfast in Thomaston, Georgia, about halfway to Atlanta. There were four of us in the car, and we all ordered about the same thing. But when the waitress brought my bill, I noticed that it was less than the others. Perhaps seeking credit for being an honest customer, I called her back and began to tell her that she had made a mistake. An older farmer, dressed in overalls, was sitting at a nearby table and apparently overheard my conversation. He looked over at us and called out in a loud voice, ‘Your bill ain’t no mistake, Mr. President. Before eight o’clock they give free coffee to senior citizens.’

“A wave of laught began at our table, and it still resonated through the restaurant as I paid my bill and hurried back to the car. For several weeks afterward, every time we approached Thomaston I knew that someone would say, ‘Why don’t we stop here for breakfast? There’s free coffee for some of us!'” (pp. ix-x).

When Jimmy Carter was voted out of the Presidency, he and his wife found that their “Blind Trust Fund” had been badly managed and their home and farm in Plains were deeply in debt, too.  And then they faced another issue, as he tells it:

“There were other reasons as well why moving from Washington back to our home in Plains was not a pleasant experience. It was not easy to forget about the past, overcome our fear of the future, and concentrate on the present. In this small and tranquil place, it was naturual for us to assume–kike other retirees–that our productive lives were about over. Like many other involuntary retirees, we had to overcome our distress and make the best of the situation.

“When one of our friends pointed out that more than a third of American men in my age troup were retired, and that we could expect to live until we were eighty years old, I had one disturbing reaction: What was I going to do with the next twenty-five yeears?” ( pp. 2-3)

“. . . as we entered our seventies there was another potential threat to our happiness: the forced realization that both of us fit almost any definition of ‘old age.’ I guess it is unpleasant for any of us to face our inevitale gray or thinning hair and the tendency for our waistline to spread, especially when advancing years correspond to a reduced income. This brings a challenging but inevitable transition in our lives — from what we have been to a new type of existence as ‘senior citizens.'” (p. 8)

“So then, when are we old? The corrrect answer is that each of us is old when we think we are — when we accept an attitude of dormancy, dependence on others, a substantial limitation on our physical and mental activity, and restrictions on the number of other people with whom we interact. As I know from experience, this is not tied very closely to how many years we’ve lived.” ( p. 11)

“Driving on the interstate highway in Atlanta to go to The Carter Center, for several months we regularly passed a large billboard advertising country music. The sign said, ‘My wife ran off with my best friend, and I miss him.’ This doesn’t apply to us [i.e., he and Rosalynn]. We seem to be bound together with ever-increasing bonds as we’ve grown older and need each other more. When we are apart for just a day or so, I have the same hollow feeling of loneliness and unassuaged desire as when I was away at sea for a week or more during the first years of our marriage.” ( p. 39)

We’ll share more from this book in a future issue of THE PAREGIEN JOURNAL.

****

Well, here it is — another 4th of July. 

I’m sitting here looking at the “celebrity” birthdays for July 4th and, shazam, I do know more than a couple. Those include . . .  Eva Marie Saint (actress, 93), . . .  Gina Lollobrigida, atress, 90; as an early teen . . . or maybe a pre-teen, I fell in love with that beautiful lady on the flying trapeze in the movie starring she and Tony Curtis and Burt Lancaster, a for-real former circus trapeze star) . . . Neil Simon (90, playwright) . . . and that’s as “young” as I can recognize on the list. Of course, that doggone lists includes somebody named Malia Obama, age 19. Oh, wait a minute, I remember. Nah, never mind.

Then there was this historical oddity under “Today In History,” where on July 4, 1826 — exactly 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was adopted — two of our nation’s former presidents died, that being John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

Finally, on July 4, Charles Kuralt died in New York at the age of 62. You remember Charles Kuralt, don’t you? He was the CBS reporter who, with only his TV camerman/soundman as a companion, traveled the backroads of the United States. He was born Sept. 10, 1934 and died on July 4, 1997.

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“On the Road” was one of the most popular TV programs–actually, filler spots in the CBS news–that CBS had at the time. He always seemed so doggoned friendly, with a lot of homegrown wisdom, and he could sniff out a seemingly insignificant story and make it a masterpiece. Here are a few of his quotes:

The love of family and the admiration of friends is much more important than wealth and privilege.

 Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything.
The everyday kindness of the back roads more than makes up for the acts of greed in the headlines.

 

I recall, in particular, one time he and his cameraman were rolling down a back road in Tennessee or Kentucky . . . and Charles notes a bunch of clothes hanging out back of an old farm house (very few of those new-fangled “clothes dryers” out in the country). So he stopped and visited with the lady and her family and wound up with a very informative and enjoyable six minutes of film. He never won a Pulitzer Prize, but he was one heck of a fine reporter. We still miss you, Mr. Kuralt.

*****

Wise Words for the Young and the Old

From a Member of the Royal Family

 

Be generous: Invest in acts of charity.

Charity yields high returns.

 Don’t hoard your goods; spread them around.

Be a blessing to others. This could be your last night.

 

When the clouds are full of water, it rains.

When the wind blows down a tree, it lies where it falls.

Don’t sit there watching the wind. Do your own work.

Don’t stare at the clouds. Get on with your life.

 

Just as you’ll never understand  the mystery of life

forming in pregnant woman,

So you’ll never understand the mystery at work

in all that God does.

 

Go to work in the morning

and stick to it until evening without watching the clock.

You never know from moment to moment

how your work will turn out in the end.

Beauty in a sunny day - Ecclesiastes 11  

 Oh, how sweet the light of day,

And how wonderful to live in the sunshine!

Even if you live a long time, don’t take a single day for granted.

Take delight in each light-filled hour,

Remembering that there will also be many dark days

And that most of what comes your way is smoke.

 

 

You who are young, make the most of your youth..

Relish your youthful vigor.

Follow the impulses of your heart.

If something looks good to you, pursue it.

But know also that not just anything goes;

You have to answer to God for every last bit of it.

 

Live footloose and fancy-free  —

You won’t be young forever.

Youth lasts about as long as smoke.

 

Honor and enjoy your Creator while you’re still young,

Before the years take their toll and your vigor wanes,

Before your vision dims and the world blurs

And the winter years keep you close to the fire.

 

In old age, your body no longer serves you so well.

Muscles slacken, grip weakens, joints stiffen.

The shades are pulled down on the world.

You can’t come and go at will. Things grind to a halt.

The hum of the household fades away.

You are wakened now by bird-song.

 

 Aging -- Man - very old with white hair and beard -- 05-A copyrighted by Antonio Silvas

 

Hikes to the mountains are a thing of the past.

Even a stroll down the road has its terrors.

Your hair turns apple-blossom white,

Adorning a fragile and impotent matchstick body.

Yes, you’re well on your way to eternal rest,

While your friends make plans for your funeral.

 

Life, lovely while it lasts, is soon over.

Life as we know it, precious and beautiful, ends.

The body is put back in the same ground it came from.

The spirit returns to God, who first breathed it.

 

It’s all smoke, nothing but smoke.

The Quester says that everything’s smoke.

 

Besides being wise himself, the Quester also taught others

knowledge. He weighed, examined, and arranged many

proverbs. The Quester did his best to find the right words

and write the plain truth.

 

The words of the wise prod us to live well.

They’re like nails hammered home, holding life together.

They are given by God, the one Shepherd.

 

But regarding anything behind this, dear friend, go easy.

There’s no end to the publishing of books, and constant

study wears you out so you’re no good for anything else.

The last and final word is this:

 Fear God.

Do what he tells you.

 

And that’s it. Eventually God will bring everything

that we do out into the open and judge it according

to its hidden intent, whether it’s good or evil.

 Solomon -- a painting from the internet

                         Painting of Solomon

 

Ecclesiastes 11:1 to 12:14 ( The Message) by King

Solomon (aka “The Quester”).  He was a son of King David

of Israel and was appointed King himself at the age of 12.

He only lived 52 years, from 848 B.C. to 796 B.C.). His

major accomplishment was in completing the Jewish

Temple in Jerusalem. Well, that and finding out how to

keep his 300 wives and 700 concubines happy.

 

— See ya the next time. I’m trying to get back into the groove of posting every Thursday. Well, that’s my goal, anyway. — Stan

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Issue 355 – What Does July 4th Mean?

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paregienjournal.com     –     Issue 355     –     June 29, 2017

Well, home owners in Manatee County are doing quite well, thank you. In May of 2017, the median sales price for an existing single-family home stood at $299,000. Folks, that was a 53 percent increase from the end of 2012. Of course, don’t forget there was a big-time real estate “bust” here from 2008 until early 2012. 

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There was a fine little story in our local paper this morning. Reporter James A. Jones, Jr., did a little feature on a former Manatee County school educator named Bill O’Brien. Bill spends a lot of his time bowling these days, just as he has for the last 76 years. Hey, if I’m lyin’ I’m dyin’. Okay, technically like everyone else, I’m dying bit by bit. But I’m not lyin’. 

You see, Bill O’Brien is now 93 years old. He was first the principal of Prine Elementary, then of Pine View Elementary and then of Parrish Elementary School. A pretty darned good athlete himself in college, after World War II (he was wounded), 31 years ago he started presenting to Manatee County’s top cross country runners each year the “Bill O’Brien Trophy” and he is still doing it. Plus, he set up three endowed scholarship funds to help a few students each year. Bill is a pretty solid citizen, and I’d like to meet him one of these days.

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Across the Manatee River in Palmetto, several remaining members of the Lincoln Memorial High School – Class of 1967 – met for their 50th reunion. What is really unusual about these people is they were about the last class to graduate from LMHS — an all-black school. There were 131 seniors in their class, but 42 have died. 

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It has been quite a spell, but at 9:30 a.m. on  Thursday, June 22nd, I met friends Romolo (aka “Rom,” “Ron,” and “Youse guy”) Colella and Don (“The Poetry Machine”) Betts for a late breakfast at Leon’s House of Omelets in the shopping center just west of I-75 and on the south side of Highway 70 (53rd Avenue). We had some coffee and came up with solutions for most of the problems in the United States. Then after breakfast, we developed plans for solving Europe’s difficulties. Next time we’ll work on the energy crisis, I guess. Just routine stuff for old geezers. So if any of you want to join us, give me a call to make sure we’ll be there next time and not at our respective doctor appointments. Ah, yes, the “Golden Years of Life.” Between the three of us, we might have an ounce of gold and everybody is after it. Even if they have to pull it from our teeth.

****

Many may not be aware of the fact that the home headquarters and training center for Goodwill Industries is only a mile or so east of our hacienda. Those folks certainly do a lot of good for many disabled people, with training and jobs and such. Still, because the CEO at Goodwill makes a lot more money than the CEOs of any other similar charities, we prefer to make donations to the Salvation Army. And there are a couple of other Goodwill policies which bug me. They are skilled marketers, of course, taking donated items and marking them up as far as the market will allow. And around here they have donation centers about as common as McDonald’s.

In Manatee County and next-door Sarasota County they have established four stand-alone stores specializing in music and books, and these are very well-organized. But, simultaneously, they have junked the book departments in their regular stores. Once they, too, had books well-organized by topics. No more. In our regular stores, they are heaped together and making it a headache to wade through the mess. Oh, and one other thing I’ve noticed (which other thrift stores have started doing) is that on men’s shirts, for example, they still place price tags and sizes on the individual shirts . . . but then they throw them on the shirt racks with no size organization at all. I don’t get it, don’t like it and won’t shop at the regular stores for clothes or books. Very poor customer service, but easier for them, I guess. 

****

Our daughter, Mrs. John (Stacy) Magness, flew in from Houston on June 13th and left on June 20th. So we got to spend a lot of quality time with her. Of course, we had to work around those pesky afternoon thunderstorms and downpours virtually every day she was here. Still got to take her to both Manatee Beach (our preferred swimmin’ hole, with life guards and a cafe with mmmm, mmmm good pancakes each morning) and to Siesta Beach. Oh, and on her first afternoon, we took her to Clearwater Beach up in nearby Clearwater, Florida. So she got to see Florida’s most award-winning beaches. 

2017--06--13 03 - Clearwater, FL - Peggy and Stacy at CLEARWATER BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 03 - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH -Stacy P Magness by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 08B - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 10A - Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--14 10B - Bradenton, FL - Stan Paregien - by Stacy Magness

2017--06--14 11 - Bradenton, FL - Stacy P Magness - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--15 12 - Sarasota, FL - luncheon cruises - by Stan Paregien

We took a very nice luncheon cruise around Sarasota Bay one day. We got to see a couple of dolphin, plus many of the multi-million dollar mansions fronting the bay. 

2017--06--17 02 - Sarasota, FL - - Stacy P Magness

2017--06--17 04 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - panorama by S Magness

2017--06--17 07 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - Stacy Magness - by Peg Paregien

Peggy took Stacy down to the fabulous Ringling Mansion, Circus Museum and Art Museum in nearby Sarasota on June 17th. They spent the entire day there and had a great time. 

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Surely this is not a sign of my memory failing or my advancing years, but . . . in the “Birthdays On This Date” section of our local rag for June 23rd I saw where Clarence Thomas– you know — a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Yep, I recognized him . . . but the long list of “younger” musicians, writers, singers, and actors meant nothing to me. Hmmm.

Rogers, Will and Wiley Post -- one of last photos before deaths on Aug 15, 1935

Will Rogers (top, left) & pilot Wiley Post

And in the longer “Today in History” column I only paid much attention to this note: “In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.” Now Wiley Post, who had a wild hair or two as a teenager in Oklahoma, lost an eye when injured on an oil drilling rig in Oklahoma. So he used the insurance settlement to pay for flying lessons and with the rest he bought his very first airplane.

I read a fine biography of Post a few years back,and the author pointed out all of his successes in flying and in inventing high-altitude equipment for pilots. Because of his many ’round-the-world flights and publicity, it is true that when he and his close friend–movie and stage star Will Rogers–died in Alaska in a plane crash (flown by Post) on August 15, 1935, it was Wiley Post who was far better known outside of the United States. I have been to Rogers’ beautiful grave site and museum in Claremore, Oklahoma as well as to Post’s well-marked burial place in far north central Oklahoma City. Each man was exceptional in his own field of expertise.

****

“Paregien’s Bed & Breakfast & More” will be back in operation soon. We are expecting two of our Rwandan friends to visit us in early to mid-August. Then our son and his wife (Stan Jr. & Becky) and their son and his wife (Daniel and Leah) will be with us, from the St. Louis area, from about August 24th to Sept. 4th. We’re polishing up the horseshoe equipment and the shuffleboard stuff to keep them from getting bored here in Paradise.

****

Peggy and I watched another old movie the other night (the only kind our grandkids swear we watch, but there are a few things they don’t know). Anyway this U.S. Cavalry vs. Indians movie was titled “The Oregon Passage.” It was actually filmed in a forest over not far from Bend, Oregon. It was in color and starred a good-lookin’ dude named John Erickson, whom I had never seen before so I guess he went back to being a lifeguard or selling used cars. I noticed as they rolled the credits that the film script was actually based on a Western novel by someone we knew: Gordon D. Shirreffs.

I first met Gordon D. Shirreffs in about 1984, as I recall, at the annual convention of the members of the Western Writers of America. It was held that summer in Branson, Missouri and hosted by Jory Sherman and his wife, Charlotte. The first person I met as I entered the hotel lobby was one of my writing heroes, from the really old crowd, Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson. He and I really hit it off, especially after we found out we had each known Harry Leichler (?), the grocer and honorary mayor of the little town of Piru, Calif., where I lived with my family my last three years of high school.

Anyway, over the next few years, we would get to visit with Gordon Shirreffs and his wife Alice, who were residents of Granada Hills, Calif. at the time. At least one day of each convention was taken up with a bus trip excursion somewhere not far away. Those were always great times to visit with big-league writing pros Like Tommy, Gordon and Jory, as well as other would-be-Louis-L’Amour like myself.  

Well, the host of Turner Classic Movies that night wrapped up the showing of the rather forgettable film with a funny story about Gordon Shirreffs. In 1957 he had written a Western novel titled “Rio Bravo.” John Wayne didn’t care much for the actual book, but he loved the title and wanted it for his next movie. So he and/or his Batjack production company paid Gordon some darned good money for the book, with the agreement that Gordon could sell the actual story to anybody else but not the title. So John Wayne got the title he wanted and Gordon got the money he wanted, . . . not once but twice, as the second buyer turned it into “The Oregon Passage.” And he would laugh as he told that true story and add, “That was by far the most money I ever earned for just selling two words (“Rio Bravo”). 

Gordon Shirreffs had been born in Chicago, Ill., on Jan. 15, 1914. His mother was a recent immigrant from Scotland, and he himself sometimes played in bagpipe bands in southern California. During his lifetime he wrote some 79 novels, much in the solid historical style of Louis L’Amour, and hundreds of short stores and a bunch of stories for comic book companies. He was still living in Granada Hills when he died on Feb. 9, 1996 at the age of 82.

2016--03--17 Food -- Florida -- The Recipe Box Eatery

Above is the business card for a really nice, fairly small “mom and pop” restaurant just north of the McDonald’s near 53rd Avenue East (Highway 70) and 33rd St. East. Give ’em a try.

We ran out of TV trays for everyone at our house the other night, but luckily we had a spare out in the shed. I think this guy is saying, “Very nice!” or something like that.

Senior Citizen TV Tray

 

A Crumbled Dream

by Gene Shelburne

Amarillo, Texas

Campbell, Alexander -- liknesses -- 04 at age 65

 

Does the name Alexander Campbell mean anything to you? If you grew up in any kind of Church of Christ or Christian Church, you need to know about him. He was the founder of our American denomination.

Let me confess that, although I did grow up in such a church, I knew little about the man until I was invited to join a host of church leaders at his home in Bethany, West Virginia—way back in 1966— to mark the one hundredth anniversary of Mr. Campbell’s death.

 During that memorable week I learned that Alexander Campbell did more than found churches. In the college he built, he educated the sons of U.S. presidents. Few people noticed when Campbell boosted American wool trade by importing new breeds of sheep. Nor were many folks impressed when he was elected to West Virginia’s legislature. But his star was slowly rising.

Even founding hundreds of congregations across our young, growing country didn’t catapult Campbell to fame. He became a household name after debating—while befriending—the famous atheist Robert Owen. At his prime, this school-founding, sheep-raising, church-planting country parson was invited to address the combined houses of the U.S. Congress. In many ways he had become the Billy Graham of his day.

During that 1966 gathering in Bethany, however, we also focused on the Civil War years right before Campbell’s death. The halls of Bethany College were quiet—almost deserted—while that brutal war was raging not far away. Most of the students were on the battle lines. Campbell’s heart was broken. His own family was split, with favorite nephews wearing uniforms both blue and gray. Still worse, from his view, Christian brothers from churches he had planted and nurtured now were slaughtering each other.

Civil War -- up-close fighting between Union and Rebel troops -- 02

The young nation that Campbell had mistaken for the eve of Christ’s thousand-year reign had morphed into a hell on earth. Campbell’s dream had become a nightmare.

As Will Durant would later write: “From barbarism to civilization requires a century; from civilization to barbarism needs but a day.” Campbell saw barbarism in his final days, and it made him mourn.

With July 4th just ahead, I rehearse this sad but true story to remind us that the peace and freedom and prosperity we cherish can dissolve over night into blood and hate and tears. It did once. It can again.

Logo for Gene Shelburne - 2017

July4th--05 Flag with 4th of July

Do your children and/or grandchildren understand this day?

Best wishes until next time,

Stan

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Issue 348 – This Land Is Your Land

 

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Issue 348     –    February 6, 2017

This Land Is Your Land

I did not watch the Super Bowl football game on Feb. 5, 2017. Half-time entertainer Lady Gaga seems to have gotten favorable reviews from lots of folks. I did catch a news clip of her singing a portion of Woody Guthrie’s popular song, “This Land Is Your Land.” It is a populist, kind of get-together-and-sing-Kumbaya song. 

differences-togetherness-01

However, as the late radio broadcaster Paul Harvey used to say, . . . here is the rest of the story.

book-cover-woody-guthrie-by-stan-paregien-sr-2012

 

I made the following statements about the history of the song, “This Land Is Your Land.” in my 2012 eBook, WOODY GUTHRIE: HIS LIFE, MUSIC AND MYTH (Chapter 5):  

“On Feb. 23, 1940, Woody wrote ‘This Land Is Your Land’ while living with friend and fellow folksinger Burl Ives at the Hanover House in New York City. He wrote it to counteract what he considered the mindless sentimentality of ‘God Bless America,’ penned by the great Irving Berlin. That song just really irritated him something awful.

“Slowly but surely he worked out the words of his own song and, as usual, simply matched the lyrics up with an existing song. In this case it was the melody of a gospel song, ‘Oh, My Loving Brother,’ a melody that was also borrowed by the Carter Family for their song, ‘Little Darling, Pal of Mine’. Woody titled his song, ‘This Land Is Your Land’ and pretty much forgot about it until April of 1944.

“When the song finally surfaced and was recorded, it only included the first four verses (see below). And it quickly gained traction. Today the first few verses are sung by people all over the world, sometimes with a few adaptations to fit the Canadian or Japanese or Irish or whatever culture. It has been recorded by virtually everyone under the sun, from Bing Crosby to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. In the 1960s President Lyndon Baines Johnson was one of the first to wonder if maybe it should replace our national anthem. And various big-name corporations, including United Airlines and the Ford Motor Company, have used bits of it for their sales pitches on TV and radio.

“Here is how those first four verses read:

1   This land is your land, This land is my land
From California to the New York island;
From the red wood forest to the Gulf Stream waters
This land was made for you and Me.

 2  As I was walking that ribbon of highway,
I saw above me that endless skyway:
I saw below me that golden valley:
This land was made for you and me.

 3  I’ve roamed and rambled and I followed my footsteps
To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts;
And all around me a voice was sounding:
This land was made for you and me.

 4  When the sun came shining, and I was strolling,
And the wheat fields waving and the dust clouds rolling,
As the fog was lifting a voice was chanting:
This land was made for you and me.

“The problem with most of the admiration for this song is that the four-verses-only version hides or at least ignores the whole point of the complete song. With all of its verses intact, ‘This Land is Your Land’ stands as a Marxist chant for communal property. Here is how those last three verses read:

5   As I went walking I saw a sign there
And on the sign it said “No Trespassing.”
But on the other side it didn’t say nothing,
That side was made for you and me.

6   In the shadow of the steeple I saw my people,
By the relief office I seen my people;
As they stood there hungry, I stood there asking
Is this land made for you and me?

7  Nobody living can ever stop me,
As I go walking that freedom highway;
Nobody living can ever make me turn back
This land was made for you and me.

“Now, go back and read the first line of the first verse. Doesn’t it take on a much darker meaning? It should because this song is, in fact, radical leftist Guthrie’s most clear challenge to life as most American’s know it.

“He understood that private property rights were, more often than not in the United States, used by land-owning corporations to put down the workers. They and their henchmen, the courts and law enforcement, constantly trampled on workers’ constitutional-granted rights of freedom of speech and freedom to assemble.

“So he was calling on people to join the fight against the concept of private ownership of property which, historically, has been the lynchpin of American politics and economics. Woody reasoned that he was taking the high moral ground in advocating that all Americans should share equally in America’s wealth and property.

“Keep in mind, too, that one of the reasons Guthrie wrote this song was to protest the idealism of the big hit song of 1939-1940, ‘God Bless America.’ And it is in verse 6 that he makes the point that the America he saw, from sea to shining sea, was filled with poor and unemployed people standing in welfare lines. And he felt that capitalism and its innate greed were responsible for the awful situation in which there was a great gulf between the bankers and the guys digging ditches or even those who just wish they had a job of any kind. So nothing would change—the poor will continue to be with us en mass—until we change capitalism to communism. And, though not stated in the song, it was his belief that the labor movement—and unions, in particular—could accomplish that goal.

 “Was Woody a Communist Party Member?

 “Was Woody Guthrie a member of the official Communist Party or was he just a sympathizer on the outside looking in or was he just a guy who sympathized and identified with poor, hard-hit people and sought help from any source?

“Guy Logsdon expressed his point of view when I interviewed him in 2006: ‘Woody loved the United States of America. He loved Oklahoma. And he loved Okemah. He never wrote anything bad against them. He wrote against greed and anything having to do with the suppression of innocent people. If that makes him a Communist, then Jesus was a Communist. Woody was the poet philosopher of the people, the voice of the ordinary person.

“’However, Woody was not radical enough to be a communist. The Almanac Singers, some of whom later became stars as a group called The Weavers, wrote and performed pro-labor and anti-war songs. You know Franklin Roosevelt had a program to rebuild the economy and get production and prices stabilized. It involved killing every fourth cow and plowing under every fourth acre. So the Almanac Singers recorded a song called, ‘Plow Under Every Fourth Soldier’ in protest to the war. That offended a lot of people.

“’And the public sentiment changed radically when Germany waged war against Russia. So the Almanac Singers dropped that song from their programs very quickly. And they started writing and performing anti-Hitler songs.

“’When Woody went to New York City, he was in awe of what they were doing. And he sometimes attended meetings of the Communist Party but, as Pete Seeger has often said, ‘Woody was not a Communist. The Communist Party was a tightly structured organization. And Woody Guthrie wouldn’t join anything like that, because his nature was too independent and unstructured.’”

“Perhaps so. But as we have quoted previously, Woody made that admission or assertion of membership himself. And he did it in what my dear ol’ English teacher at Fillmore (California) High School—Mrs. Percy—would call a simple declarative sentence: “The best thing I did in 1936 [he got the actual date wrong; it was 1939] was to sign up with the Communist Party . . . ” (see Chapter 4.)

“When all views are heard, it seems clear that Woody Guthrie was at the least a solid sympathizer and supporter of the Communist Party. He was a man of his times, and those times were very hard for the working class. So whether he was a card-carrying member of the Party seems immaterial today. And it seems to me that, in the final analysis, Guthrie really had more faith in the unions than he did in Communism. In 1944 he said, ‘I live union. I eat union. I think union. I see union. I walk it and I talk it. I sing it and I preach it’ (Quoted by Ed Cray, Ramblin’ Man: The Life and Times of Woody Guthrie [2011], page 283).

 “Well, as I said, he filed the song away and pretty much forgot about it for several years. But it would finally end up as his signature song and in its four-verse form one of the most sung songs in the world.”

One more thing. The big news right now is about our immigration and deportation policies (or lack thereof). It is old news, really.

immigration-plymouth-rock

Woody Guthrie had a big place in his heart for the frequently abused immigrant workers and their families. He spent a great deal of time traveling around to make-shift worker’s camps to listen to their problems and to encourage them with his songs. 

In 1948, an event happened that triggered a great deal of anger in Woody.  The U.S. Immigration & Naturalization Department had chartered a DC-3 airplane to deport back to Mexico both illegal immigrants and those Mexicans whose work permits had expired. They left Oakland, Calif., on Jan. 28th with 28 such deportees on board, plus the pilot, a co-pilot, a guard and a stewardess. The plane crashed in a ball of fire near Los Gatos, California.The news reports mentioned the staff members by name and said 28 deportees were also killed. No mention of their names, leaving the impression they were of no importance.

Guthrie took that as a personal insult and an outrage. He went into a writing frenzy, pouring his heart and soul in a song he titled, “Deportees” (also known as “Plane Wreck at Los Gatos”):

Plane Wreck at Los Gatos

(also known as “Deportees”)
by Woody Guthrie

The crops are all in and the peaches are rott’ning,
The oranges piled in their creosote dumps;
They’re flying ’em back to the Mexican border
To pay all their money to wade back again

Goodbye to my Juan, goodbye, Rosalita,
Adios mis amigos, Jesus y Maria;
You won’t have your names when you ride the big airplane,
All they will call you will be “deportees”

My father’s own father, he waded that river,
They took all the money he made in his life;
My brothers and sisters come working the fruit trees,
And they rode the truck till they took down and died.

Some of us are illegal, and some are not wanted,
Our work contract’s out and we have to move on;
Six hundred miles to that Mexican border,
They chase us like outlaws, like rustlers, like thieves.

We died in your hills, we died in your deserts,
We died in your valleys and died on your plains.
We died ‘neath your trees and we died in your bushes,
Both sides of the river, we died just the same.

The sky plane caught fire over Los Gatos Canyon,
A fireball of lightning, and shook all our hills,
Who are all these friends, all scattered like dry leaves?
The radio says, “They are just deportees”

Is this the best way we can grow our big orchards?
Is this the best way we can grow our good fruit?
To fall like dry leaves to rot on my topsoil
And be called by no name except “deportees”?

Sad to say that the practice of devaluing other people is still alive and well. We often find fault with those who are different from ourselves — morally, culturally, racially, religiously and politically. The list goes on.

Now, friends, if you look at this thing strictly logically and scientifically (not morally or religiously) the woes and injustices to the poor, the weak and sickly and the disenfranchised should be of no concern to those of us who are winners in the lottery of life. After all, scientist Charles Darwin preached the survival of the fittest as being in the best interest of the world. So why should one glob of atoms (a human) give a flip about another glob (another human)? You know the routine: (1) Look out for Number 1; (2) What’s mine is mine and I’m after yours; (3) The real “Golden Rule” is that whoever has the gold rules; (4) Greed is good; and (5) Don’t get involved.

Well, . . . if you buy that premise, then it is kinda irrational to do otherwise, don’t you think? Maybe that’s why you’re never seen anywhere a hospital founded and funded by the American Association of Atheists. That’s why there are no major philanthropic foundations operated by the American Humanist Association. That’s what the Society for Humanistic Judaism sits around gazing at their navels. 

Thankfully, however, there are people of goodwill and generous acts of kindness in every group and country. Concern for others, whether a friend or a neighbor or an enemy, is still alive and well.

For example, loving concern is a fundamental theme in the sacred Jewish texts. Here is a sampling from Exodus 23:1-9: “(1) Don’t spread rumors. Don’t plot with evil people to act as a lying witness. (2) Don’t take sides with important people to do wrong. When you act as a witness, don’t stretch the truth to favor important people. (3) But don’t privilege unimportant people in their lawsuits either. (4) When you happen to come upon your enemy’s ox or donkey that has wandered off, you should bring it back to them. (5) When you see a donkey that belongs to someone who hates you and it’s lying down under its load and you are included not to help set it free, you must help set it free. (6) Don’t undermine the justice that your poor deserve in their lawsuits. (7) Stay away from making a false charge. Don’t put an innocent person who is in the right to death, because I will not consider innocent those who do such evil. (8) Don’t take a bribe, because a bribe blinds the clear-sighted and subverts the cause of those who are in the right. (9) Don’t oppress an immigrant. You know what it’s like to be an immigrant, because you were immigrants in the land of Egypt.” — from the COMMON ENGLISH BIBLE (used with permission)

Christians, too, recognize their duty and honor to serve others who have hit hard times. John the Baptist, who was in prison at the time, sent word to this new teacher named Jesus and asked him for some proof that the was the longed-for Messiah. Jesus did not cite as evidence that he had formed a large anti-Roman army, nor that he had a large political campaign war chest, nor that the Who’s Who of Israel were his backers. Amazingly, Jesus told the messengers, “Go, report to John what you hear and see. Those who were blind are able to see. Those who are crippled are walking. People with skin diseases are cleansed. Those who were deaf now hear. Those who were dead are raised up. The poor have good news proclaimed to them.” (Matthew 11:4-5, CEB)

A lawyer with the Pharisee sect of Judaism tried to trap Jesus one time by asking him what the greatest commandment was in the Law of Moses. Jesus said, ” (37) You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your being, and with all your mind. (38) This is the first and greatest commandment. (39) And the second is like it: You must love your neighbor as you love yourself. All the Law and the Prophets depend on these two commands.” (Matthew 22:37-39, CEB)

It is clear in both Judaism and in Christianity that love for others–not just a good feeling but positive, practical help–is fundamental to religious faith.

The apostle James chided his peers by saying, “(2) Imagine two people coming into your meeting. One has a gold ring and fine clothes, while the other is poor, dressed in filthy rags. (3) Then suppose that you were to take special notice of the one wearing fine clothes, saying, ‘Here’s an excellent place. Sit here.’ But to the poor person you say, ‘Stand over there’; or, ‘Here, sit at my feet.’ (4) Wouldn’t you have shown favoritism among yourselves and become evil-minded judges?

“(5) My dear brothers and sisters, listen! Hasn’t God chosen those who are poor by worldly standards to be rich in terms of faith? Hasn’t God chosen the poor as heirs of the kingdom he has promised to those who love him? (6) But you have dishonored the poor. Don’t the wealthy make life difficult for you? Aren’t they the ones who drag you into court? (7) Aren’t they the ones who insult the good name spoken over you at your baptism?

“(8) You do well when you really fulfill the royal law found in scripture, Love your neighbor as yourself.” (James 2:2-8, CEB)

That, my friends, is why you see hundreds of hospitals and universities and homes for the needy founded by and funded by the faith community. Highly respected Jewish hospitals and Christian hospitals are found across America, as are homes for the homeless and abused. Back in my old stomping ground, Oklahoma City, we had the Baptist Hospital, Deaconess Hospital (Methodist), and Mercy Hospital (Catholic), each of them a fine facility caring for anyone who walked through the door. Other religious organizations work every day to help migrants with legal work or with learning English, or helping pregnant women save their babies from abortions, or rescuing young men and women from sex traffickers and drug dealers. And the list of good works goes on and on.

“This Land is Your Land” is a nice song title and sorta give us a warm, fuzzy feeling. In fact, I have personally adapted it to create songs for the people of Rwanda (“Rwandans, This Land Is Our Land”), for the people of Honduras (“Hondurans, This Land Is Your Land”), and for the people of Ireland (“Ireland Is Your Land).  View videos of those songs and 50 others on my “Stan Paregien’s Studio” on YouTube at:https://www.youtube.com/user/CowboyStan/videos

My point is this: it takes that “good feeling” and $5.00 to get you a cup of java at Starbucks. Fact is, it is up to you and to me to look for opportunities to honor God by doing good wherever we go and by teaching others to do the same.  

So if you are looking for hope and purpose in your life, please take a serious look around you. Observe how your neighbors are living. Is it the Believers who are more happy and fulfilled . . . and busy helping others . . . or is it the Non-Believers? There are exceptions, of course, for no one is perfect in practicing their philosophy of life. But my 75+ years of experience has shown me that people of faith actually believe that history is headed somewhere and they are not just sitting hopelessly on a spinning earth.

Just sayin’.

[NOTE: My eBook, WOODY GUTHRIE: HIS LIFE, MUSIC AND MYTH, is available in seven popular formats at:  https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/StanParegien . You’ll find over a dozen more of my eBooks there as well. And before long there will be another one on the list, right now tentatively titled MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA: FACTS, FOLKS AND PHOTOS. Stay tuned.]

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Issue 347 – Ree Drummond, The Pioneer Woman

Issue 347     –     January 30, 2017

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Ree Drummond: “The Pioneer Woman”

 by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Jan. 30, 2017

The lady now known as “The Pioneer Woman” was born Ann Marie Smith and nicknamed “Ree.” She grew up as a privileged kid, living with her parents in an upscale house in Bartlesville, Okla., near the 7th tee of an exclusive country club. In 1987 she graduated from Bartlesville High School. In 1991 she graduated with a bachelor’s degree in gerontology from the University of Southern California.

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So Ree Smith’s life was progressing right along a desirable path for a upper class lifestyle. Then Cupid forced her into a left turn up a country dirt road. That’s when she married a good ol’ boy, a hands-on rancher in nearby Pawhuska, Oklahoma by the name of Ladd Drummond. The result was that she became as comfortable in cowboy boots as she had been in high heels. She learned how to help deliver calves, how shovel manure out of stalls, how to rope a horse and how to cook meals cowboy style.

Ah, yes, that cooking thing.

Ree Smith Drummond had a natural talent for cooking and she began to share her recipes and experiences on her blog titled, “The Pioneer Woman: From Heels to Tractor Wheels.” Remember that degree of hers in gerontology? Initially she was a journalism major and she apparently took really good notes. Hundreds and then thousands of people—mostly ladies—sat up and paid attention. And it snowballed. By 2009, she was logging 13 million hits per month. Two years later her blog was receiving 23 million hits per month, with about 4 million being unique individuals. Amazing.

Also in 2009, Drummond saw the publication of her very first cookbook. It was titled, The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes from an Accidental Country Girl.

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Of all things, in 2011 Ree switched to writing a children’s book featuring their own dog, Charlie. I don’t know, but the idea for writing about the family’s flop-earred companion may have come from the highly successful “Hank the Cowdog” series of books in which author John Erickson describes ranch life through the eyes of Hank. In any event, Charlie the Ranch Dog was a hit. And she has published several more since then.

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Also in 2011, her publisheR sorted through her blogs going back to 2007 and compiled them into a book titled, The Pioneer Woman: From Black Heels to Tractor Wheels. It talked about food, of course, but it was mainly a lively revelation of how a city gal fell in love with a cowboy. And it jumped to Number 2 on the NY Times hardcover non-fiction list.

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Now, keep in mind that this jeans-clad cowboy was part of a well-to-do Drummond clan. He wasn’t exactly sleeping out in the bunkhouse with the hired hands when he met the redhead from Bartlesville. So when Rees and Ladd Drummond  honeymooned, they did it in style. They went to Australia.

Ladd Drummond’s ancestor, Frederick Drummond, immigrated from Scotland to the United States in 1884 at the age of 20. He promptly invested in a Texas cattle operation and, knowing nothing about the business, even more promptly lost his money. About 1886 young Fred, now a bit wiser, went to work as a trader (licensed by the U.S. Government). He got a job with the Osage Mercantile Company way out in the village of Pawhuska in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), right on the Osage tribe’s reservation. He sold or traded hundreds of Pendleton-brand blanets and other merchandise to the Osage.

Then love came calling and he married Ms. Adeline Gentner in 1890. They were frugal and saved enough money for Fred to puchase a partnership in the OMC. By 1904, he had stockpiled enough cash to starting his own outfil, The Hominy Trading Company, in the village of Hominy. In time he diversified into real estate, ranching and banking investments. And in 1905, Frederick Drummond built his dream home in Hominy, a Victorian style mansion that still stands today. It is now a museum operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society. It is located at 305 North Price Avenue in Hominy.

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Mrs. and Mrs. Fred Drummond had four children: R. C. (Cecil), F. G. (Gentner), Blanche, and A. A. (Jack). When the patriarch of the family died in 1913, the three Drummond sons went together and founded the Drummond Cattle Company.

Ladd Drummond attended Arizona State University, but he has made his living the hard way. Working the cattle and the land day after day, come rain, shine or snow. Here’s a photo of Ladd Drummond from back in 2011 when he competed in the Amarillo (TX) Range Rodeo with a team of cowboys from the Drummond Land & Cattle Company. They competed in several events, including Wild Cow Milking and Team Branding. Their team was the winner for the sixth consecutive year. And Ladd was chosen as “The Tough Hand” of the rodeo. Heck, no surprise there.

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Well, back to the Pioneer Woman.

Along came the year of 2012. In March of that year Ree published her second cookbook, The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes from My Frontier. While her first book was well-received, this one rang the bell so loudly no one could ignore it. That book hit Number 1 on the Non-Fiction list and stayed there, not just for a week or two but for months. Ca-ching, ca-ching, ca-ching.

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In 2016, Ladd and Ree Drummond proudly opened the doors to The Pioneer Woman Mercantile (and restaurant, and bakery) on the main drag in Pawhuska. They bought the delapidated two-story building in 2011 and worked on remodeling it on a pay-as-you-go basis. Finally, after several years of starts and pauses they got ‘er done. And they did a magnificent job of turning an eye sore into a beautiful, modern place of business. Lots of business, believe me.

My wife Peggy and I went there with James and Glenda Cotton on Friday, January 27, 2017. We all spent quite a bit of time in the Mercantile, then we each had a cup of coffee and a cinnamon roll at the bakery on the second floor of the building. Peggy and I got to meet Ladd Drummond and I took a photo of her with him. A few minutes later I was able to take several photos of Ree Drummond after she came out from an office to sign her book and was swamped by dozens of enthusiastic fans. 

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It has become the major tourist draw in that small town. People—yes, mostly ladies—flock there in droves. And on the mercantile floor they eagerly go elbow-to-elbow to select fairly high-end dishes, coffee cups, ball caps, books, sewing material and related items, aprons, rolling pins, and novelty items like Bison Lip Balm. Then they stand in a long line to pay out. And, what with all that hard work, they get in another line to eat at either the full-service restaurant or the bakery upstairs.

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So, there you have it. Ree Drummond zig-zagged to a career she never imagined. She is an award-winning blogger, a nationally recognized force in the book publishing industry, a host of her own wildly popular TV cooking show on the FoodNetwork, the owner of her own retail store and much more. Add to that the role of mother to four teenagers and wife of a hard-working rancher.

Ree, as they like to say in Oklahoma, “Ya done good. Real good.”

NOTE: Her web site is at: http://www.thepioneerwoman.com, and that’s where you’ll find her blogs. 

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Issue 340 – Our 50-Year Old Son

The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 340  –  September 06, 2016  — Stan Paregien Sr., Editor

Our 50-Year Old Son

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You know you’re really getting some mileage on your ol’ speedometer when you wake up one day to discover that your baby boy just turned 50-years of age. 

Yikes. I have trouble believing that I am way over 50+ muchless that our son is five decades into his life (or will be at the end of September).

Time for a little reality check.

Peggy and I were married in Ventura, California on May 31, 1962. Yep, 54 years ago. We immediately rented a small U-Haul trailer and pulled it behind my customized 1955 Ford all the way to Nashville, Tenn. We moved there for me to study at David Lipscomb College (now known as Lipscomb University). I intended to eventually teach for a living while living in a mission field in the U.S. and preaching for a church part-time. To make that happen, Peggy went to work to earn our main income. Meanwhile, I preached on Sundays for various small churches (Mars Hill Church of Christ northwest of Bowling Green, Kentucky; Greenville Church of Christ, Greenville, KY.; and the Chestnut Ridge Church of Christ way out in the country east of Petersburg, Tenn.).

In 1965, I graduated from Lipscomb U with a major in Speech Communication and minors in History and Bible. My goal was to teach speech courses in a college somewhere, and to do that I needed at least a master’s degree. So with the help of Dr. Bill Banowsky and Dr. Carol Ellis, I applied for and was accepted for graduate study at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. So we rented a slighly larger U-Hall  trailer and headed west.

Peggy, again, took a full-time job to help support us while I worked on my master’s degree. She worked as a customer service person at a branch of the Bank of New Mexico out on the east side of Central Avenue (old 66 Highway). And I was awarded an “Assistantship” for a pittance each month to work with the UNM debate team and to teach a beginning speech class. We worshiped with the good folks at the Netherwood Park Church of Christ not far from the UNM campus, and for a time I worked as the Associate Minister with Minister Darrell Rickard.

All was chugging along like clockwork as we lived in a rented duplex near the airport. Then one of life’s little detours happened early in 1966. We found out Peggy was pregnant and would be having our first child in September or so. Well, I finished my course work at UNM and late that summer I began looking for a full-time job. I couldn’t teach on the college level until I had completed my masters, so I talk with a few churches in southern New Mexico about working with them. And the elders of the College Church of Christ (now the University Church of Christ) in Las Cruces invited me to preach for them.

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That’s how it all came about that in September of 1966 I was preaching for the 250-member congregation in Las Cruces and starting to write my master’s thesis on “A Rhetorical Analysis of the Speeches of Robert G. Ingersoll.” Then one night I spoke at a little dinner for our congregation’s college-age students at nearby New Mexico State University. Peggy went with me.

Early the next morning, before sunup, Peggy awoke me complaining about a stomach ache. “I think it may be that spinach we ate last night,” she suggested.

Nope. It wasn’t the spinach. It was our baby and it was on the way. Somehow I got her to Dona Anna Hospital and watched as the nurses wisked her away to begin preparations. I, meanwhile, did the hard part: waiting nervously for our firstborn to make his or her appearance. Okay, okay. I’m kidding. Peggy had quite a long struggle with the birth, but . . . Shazam! Our first child made his grand entry and we slapped on him the exalted (but cumbersome) name of Stanley Eugene Paregien, Jr. After experimenting with various nicknames–such as “Little Stan” and “Junior”–we settled on “Gene.” And that’s what folks called him until he graduated from high school in 1985. However, that same year he joined the Air Force Reserves, where they call you by your first name, regardless. So folks who met him from the start of his college days until now only know him as “Stan.” 

One thing about it, I did not have any trouble indentifying my prodigy in the busy hospital nursery. He was the only baby there with a thin crop of blond hair, while there were about a dozen Hispanic babies there with beautiful and full crops of coal-black hair.

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Stan Jr. (“Gene”) days after his birth in 1966.

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Alright, now lets “fast forward” to the fact that Stan Jr. started kindergarden at Stroud, Oklahoma and graduated from high school there in 1985.

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Stan Jr.’s very first day of school — Stroud, OK — Sept., 1972

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In addition, Gene (as he was known in high school) was a self-motivated kid. That was so whether he was in the classroom or playing in sports. He was a darned good running back in football, and he set two or three school records as a runner in track. 

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He spent the summer of 1985 going through basic training in San Antonio with the U.S. Air Force (Reserves), and that fall he started college at Oklahoma Christian University in Oklahoma City.

That’s when the plot thickened. At OCU he met a pretty and vivacious little gal named Becky McLain from Gallup, New Mexico. By early in 1986 they were talking about getting married. And they did so in Stroud, Oklahoma on May 10, 1986. Stan Jr. became an instant father, as Becky and a beautiful three-year old daughter named Jodi.

1986--018  Stroud, OK  wedding of Becky McLaine and Stan Paregien

The ceremony was performed by Gene/Stan’s maternal grandfather, W.W. (“Woody”) Allen. Becky worked at Hertz’s big reservation center on Northwest Highway to support them while Stan worked on his degree in Public Relations. He worked at a couple of radio stations and also for OCU and got a few grants.

It was a proud moment for all concerned when Stan Jr. in 1989 graduated from Oklahoma Christian University with a degree in Public Relations. He went to work for OCU recruiting students, so for two or three years he traveled out of state a lot. Then he became the Public Relations Director for the “Enterprise Square Museum” right there on the OCU campus. The museum featured the history of and games related to how the U.S. economy works.  

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By Easter of 1993, it was obvious that another family member was on the way. Stan Jr. and Becky with Jodi at Edmond, Okla. 

1993--033--OklahomaCity-- Stan Paregien Jr - Becky - Jodi -- Daniel Justin -- born April 27

 

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The Oklahoma City Bombing

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The Air Force sent Stan Jr. from Tinker Air Force Base to the site to document the work that the Air Force was doing to help in the rescue/recovery effort. Even the national media were kept more than a hundred yards away, but he was right up in the carnage. He later went on a local TV show showing the photos that he had taken.

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Stan Jr., Becky, Jodi and Daniel at Christmas time in Edmond, OK.

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1998--005-- Bosnia - Stan Paregien Sr, USAF-Reserves

 

1998--042 -- former Oklahoma Governor George Nigh -- with 2nd Lt StanParegien Jr, USAF Reserves

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1999-014-- Midwest City, OK - 2nd Lt Stan Paregien Jr, USAF - tornado hit Tinker AFB

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L to R, FRONT:  Jodi (McLain) Paregien & brother Daniel. BACK:  Peggy Paregien, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling (Stan Jr.’s grandmother), Becky Paregien, and Stacy (Paregien) and husband John Magness . . . at our house on Neptune Road in Edmond, OK.

1999-067- Oklahoma City - Lt Gov Mary Fallin - 'Fergie,' Dutchess Of York - Stan Paregien Jr

1999-069- Midwest City, OK - Oklahoma Senator James Inhoff - Stan Paregien Jr - Tinker AFB

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Front row: Christal & Stacy (Paregien) Magness, Dylan Magness, Daniel Paregien with his sister Jodi.  2nd Row: Stan Paregien Jr., John Magness, Evelyn (Cauthen) Paregien Spradling [Stan Sr.’s mom], & Becky Paregien. 3rd Row: Stan Paregien Sr. and Peggy. At the home of Stan Sr. on South Neptune Road in Edmond, OK.

Soon the Air Force moved Stan Jr. to an assignment as the Public Information Officer for Scott Air Force Base in Belleville, IL. Becky found a good job in the Information Technology department at the world headquarters of Enterprise Car Rental in nearby St. Louis, Missouri. The family first bought a home due south of there out in the country near Barnhart, Missouri.

After two or three years, they moved across the Mississippi River to the little farm community of Waterloo, Illinois. They bought a large two-story house south of town.

2001-041-- Wagonner, Okla -- jam-Thanksgiving at the state lodge

2002-013  Edmond, OK -- 80th birthday for Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling

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Daniel Paregien and his father, Stan Jr., playing music in their Union Army uniforms (Civil War vintage) at an encampment and festival south of St. Louis, Missouri.

2002-163 - Daniel and Stan Paregien Jr in their Civil War uniforms

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2003--295  Iraq -Stan Paregien Jr in Iraq at Christmas

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2003--339--  IRAQ -- Kirkuk -- Senator Hillary Clinton with Stan Paregien Jr in December

2003--340  IRAQ -- Kirkuk -- Captain Stan Pregien Jr with Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld in December

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2004-045 OKC - Stan Paregien Sr family - S P Jr family - John Magness family

Then, in 2004, the Stan Paregien Jr. family expanded even more. Daughter Jodi and her husband Brandon Barrow had a baby they named Dominic. Stan and Becky’s first grandchild.

2004-079 Long Beach, CA  -  Jodi and Brandon Barrrow with baby son Dominic

2004-147-- IRAQ -- Kirkuk --- Stan Paregien Jr -- snowman -- Feb 20

2006-248 Daniel and family

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Christmas time in Waterloo, IL. Brandon Barrow family–Jodi and childdren Dominic and Bailee, and the Stan Paregien Sr. family–Becky and Daniel.

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Several of the folks in the 2010 photo above were little kids that Stan Jr. started Kindergarden with at Stroud (Okla.), in 1972. It says something good about one’s character and integrity when you are loyal to them and they to you for 38 years .

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This was my dear mother’s last Christmas on this earth. She died from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease just a few weeks later, on Feb. 23, 2011.

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Stan Jr, Daniel, Stan Sr, Christal & Rindiro

Becky Paregien & son Daniel & husband Stan Jr

 

 

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Hey, there has never been any doubt that our son knows how to have a lot of fun himself and how to make a lot of other folks smile, too.

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Whew, well folks, there you have it. After looking at the previous photos, you’ll understand why Peggy and I are so proud of our son. He has become a professional soldier, a fine writer and photographer, and a  loving husband, father and grandfather. He has also proven himself to be a dedicated Christian who is active in their local congregation, and he has demonstrated a compassionate spirit for those who are down and nearly out. 

Is he perfect? Heck, no. Not by a long shot. But Stan Jr. keeps chugging along and trying to be a better person and to help others do the same.

So . . . won’t you join his mother and me as we wish him a very happy 50th birthday? 

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The Spiritual Life, Part 2

The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 338  –  June 21, 2016  –  Stan Paregien, Editor

The Spiritual Life, Part 2

Our dear friends Clay and Pat Landes came into our lives when we moved from Edmond, Oklahoma to Bradenton, Florida in 2013. We were immediately attracted to them by their openness and hospitality, each with a smile displaying they were in a close walk with God. He has been serving Christ in many ways, and for several years has been one of the elders leading the diverse body of believers we call Central Church of Christ in Sarasota. 

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Clay & Pat on their 50th wedding anniversary

renewing their vows. Sept., 2015

 

Though he grew up in a Christian home and once professed his love for the Lord, in his early adult years he had strayed far away. When Clay finally saw the light and returned, he had a burning desire to reach out and help others who had never accepted Christ or who had let their love grow cold. And he is still at it.

That is so despite the fact that about eight months ago he was diagnosed with cancer. In early June, his regular physician said his condition had worsened significantly. So he is now in a hospice program with an array of medical and social and psychological professionals to assist them as needed. Little did that group know that they were dealing with an upbeat, optimistic man . . . who was still on a mission. He told us on Sunday, June 19, 2016, that he had just arranged to have Bible studies with two of those folks “because they need the Lord.”

That same Sunday, Clay found the strength to teach a fine Bible class on 2 Timothy 4:6-18. There was a large audience of adults, many of whom were visitors — friends of his from years back. He began by singing a song that he wrote about a year ago: “Jesus, May Your Will Be Done.” There was hardly a dry eye in the audience.

Then he went on to read the first section of Paul’s letter which begins with, “I am already being poured out as a drink offering, and the time of my departure is at hand. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Finally, there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will give to me on that Day, and not to me only but also to all who have loved His appearing.”

It was a powerful lesson from a man who, indeed, has fought a great fight for the Lord he loves and who trusts deeply in God’s grace. He knows he is going to heaven, fairly soon, and doesn’t want anyone else to miss out on going there, too. 

So here is his song, both as a poem and then as a song with the chords.

 

2016--06--19   03-A    Sarasota,  FL  -- Clay Landes -  by Stan Paregien

Jesus, May Your Will Be Done -- 2, a poem -  by Clay Landes - Copyrighted 2015

Jesus, May Your Will Be Done --  by Clay Landes - Copyrighted 2015

For those who may need a little guidance in how to share their faith more easily with others, I recommend the following book. The author was a student at Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tennessee during part of the time that I was also there. He has had a wonderfully productive Christian life. But he, also, had a diagnosis of cancer and went through many treatments before it went into remission. So he knows what it means to walk through the Valley of the Shadow of death . . . and had been able to help others who needed to walk more closely with the Lord.

1997 book by Randy Becton, EVERYDAY EVANGELISM, page 1

1997 book by Randy Becton, EVERYDAY EVANGELISM, page 2

 

Poem 454   The Purpose of the Lord's Supper - by Stan Paregien Sr  1 Cor 11 v17-34 -- Page 1 of  2

Poem 454   The Purpose of the Lord's Supper - by Stan Paregien Sr  1 Cor 11 v17-34 -- Page 2 of  2

Keep on the Sunny Side   --  Ada Benkhorn in 1928  -- gospel, bluegrassLife's Railroad to Heaven  --  Gospel, bluegrass

2015--02   The Christian Appeal -- Page 1

The above little magazine is one I’ve read and enjoyed for many years. The editors are two “Texified” brothers, Gene Shelburne of Amarillo and Curtis Shelburne of beautiful downtown Muleshoe. They are gifted writers, teachers, authors, and preachers. They are simply solid-citizens and dedicated Christian men. 

Their magazine is not jammed with the latest hot topic or with shrill voices. It is a relaxed and thoughtful, Christ-centered journal with real-life applications. So I hope you will consider becoming a subscriber. The additional good news is that it is free. Yes, Virginia, there really is such a thing as a free magazine. It is free as in no cost to you. Hundreds of folks who appreciate the journal do send money to help out. But, again, there is no subscription fee and you won’t be barraged for a donation. So give it a try. And tell them good ol’ boys that Stan sent ya. The address is below.

2015--02   The Christian Appeal -- Page 2

One of my current challenges is reducing my number of file cabinets from three to no more than two. Sounds easy enough. But my collection of articles, songs, photos, genealogical material, and etc. and etc. is a bit overwhelming. Fifty years of collecting will do that to you. But once or twice a month the notion of junking some of it strikes and I dutifully start through the files.

Well, it was while I was doing that a week or so ago that I came across the following message by a former Bible professor of mine. Dr. Batsell Barrett Baxter was a congenial, soft-spoken man with the heart of a servant and the mind of Christ. While I was at Lipscomb University, he was head of the Bible Department. And he was the beloved preacher for the Hillsboro Church. And . . . he was the featured speaker for many years on the radio and TV broadcasts called “The Herald of Truth” originating from a congregation in Abilene, Texas. So he was a busy, busy man.

On the last page of this four-page message, I have added a few photos of this wonderful Christian gentleman who died of cancer several years ago.

Baxter, Batsell Barrett  -  'The Days of Our Lives'  -  Page 1 of  4

Baxter, Batsell Barrett  -  'The Days of Our Lives'  -  Page 2 of  4

Baxter, Batsell Barrett  -  'The Days of Our Lives'  -  Page 3 of  4

Baxter, Batsell Barrett  -  'The Days of Our Lives'  -  Page 4 of  4Bible  -- not a bag of trail mix to pick and chose only what you like

 

Land of a Thousand Hills Cafe - Bradenton, FL 06-02-2016  - Benefits farmers in Rwanda - Part 1 of  2

Land of a Thousand Hills Cafe - Bradenton, FL 06-02-2016  - Benefits farmers in Rwanda - Part 2 of  2

 

Family -- Grandma - church - always welcome at church and Grandma's house --FAMILY CIRCUS

 

 

John 03 v16 --  02

Guess I’d better close for now. I do thank you for stopping by on a regular basis to see what is new. The easy way to do that, of course, is just to sign up to receive a simple email notification that I have posted more material. Please consider doing that.

For several years, Peggy and I had a little sign on our dining room wall that said, “Life is short. Eat desert first.” I saw a lot of wisdom in that and sometimes followed it.

The fact is, though, that none of us has a guarantee of even one more hour of life. Folks die all around us on a regular basis. And in that sense we are all “terminally ill.” So, my friend, let’s you and I do what we can with what we have where we are . . . to help others and to make this a better world, condemned though it is. And that also means periodically conducting a self-examination to make sure we have done all we can to have our lives and our house in order when we die. Just sayin’. 

 

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Issue 333 – Life in Florida, Part 3

Logo -- The Paregien Journal  -- 2016--05--09  03

Issue 333  –  May 9, 2016

Life in Florida, Part 3

We had a mixed-bag start to the New Year of 2016 here in Bradenton, Florida. Some good stuff and some, well, challenges. 

Early in February I went back on medicine for high blood pressure. Lisinopril, to be exact. And for the next six weeks I experienced severe headaches most of every day, plus constant fatigue, frequent dizziness and nausea. It was six long weeks of misery.  I didn’t feel like doing much of anything, but I kept thinking that surely this medicine was going to kick in soon and I would get better. Little did I know.

Finally, some medical experts here in our clubhouse (i.e., the gang we have coffee with each Saturday morning) convinced me that I ought to see a cardiologist.

Well, my cardiologist told me he began taking medicine for high blood pressure some 25 years ago. At some point he put himself on Lisinopril, . . . and had symptoms nearly identical with mine. So he immediately took me off the Lisinopril and put me on Benicar. Within a couple of days, I began to feel better as the headaches disappeared and I regained my energy. I still have a bit of dizziness, but I can control most of it by just not standing up quickly from a sitting position. Many of you know what I’m talking about. 

In March Peggy had surgery for a “hammer toe” on her right foot. She was incapacitated for a while, and I was forced at the point of a gun to go on dog patrol morning, noon and night. I’ll have to admit it was a “bonding experience.” That is, I’m even more bonded to my deeply held belief we really don’t need a dog. However, Peggy and Allie still out-vote me on that subject. 

2016--0375   March - Bradenton, FL -    Stan  Paregien and Allie  - by Virginia Corbin

Anyway, Peggy had very little pain for the first couple of weeks after her surgery. Then it started. And she is still experiencing some “needle-like tingling” in that toe. We did make it to the beach a week or so ago, but she was not quite ready to get into the Gulf water. 

Here are a few photos from this winter into spring.

2016--0268   March 17 - Bradenton, FL  -- The Recipe Box Eatery

This restaurant is a couple of miles from our house, to the east. It has a nice variety of items on the menue and the staff seem friendly and welcoming. If you’re in the area, give it a try. They have some breakfast specials which are are pretty good deal.

2016--0269   March 17 - Bradenton, FL  -- staff at Cooper; Family Medical

These are some of the folks at the office of our primary physicians. Peggy’s primary doctor is Dr. Catherine Cooper, while mine is her husband, Dr. Christopher Cooper. We have gone there since Jan. 1, 2014. If you’re looking for a primary physician, they have several from which to choose.

Here are a couple of write-ups which our neighbor, Virginia Corbin, did of some of our favorite folks here in Plantation Grove MHP. 

2016--0271  --  Bradenton, FL  --  Ralph Iacovacci and wife Eunice - by Virginia Corbin

2016--0272    April 1 - Bradenton, FL  -- article about Mike and Donna Damico by Virginia Corbin

2016--0277    Bradenton, FL  -  Peggy Paregien

I failed to mention that we bought that shawl on our trip to Ireland for our 50th anniversary in 2012.
2016--0279--B   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0280   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0281   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0282   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0284   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0285   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0286   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0287   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

2016--0288   March 14  --  Palmetto, FL  - Emerson Point Preserve --

A few weeks ago I was on Facebook and telling a friend about the scarcity of events in our area related to cowboy culture — i.e., cowboy poetry, cowboy storytelling, cowboy and Western music, etc. Then, wham bam, a few days later I saw an ad about a cowboy storyteller and poet going to me at the library in Palmetto, Florida. So we took another couple with us and enjoyed his program. Kinda makes me want to crank it up and get back on the ol’ cowboy poetry circuit. Kinda.

2016--0290   March 19  --  Palmetto, FL  - Hank Mattson, cowboy poet

2016--0291   March 19  --  Palmetto, FL  - Hank Mattson, cowboy poet
2016--0292   March 19  --  Palmetto, FL  - Hank Mattson, cowboy poet

2016--0293   March 19  --  Palmetto, FL  - Hank Mattson, cowboy poet

2016--0296--A   March 19  --  Palmetto, FL  - Hank Mattson, cowboy poet

2016--0301   March 20  --  Bradenton,  FL  --  Shirley Overfelt

2016--0302   March 20  --  Bradenton,  FL  --  Holly Woolums - Peggy Paregien

2016--0303   March 20  --  Bradenton,  FL  --  Peggy Paregien and Judy Teeuwen

2016--0304   March 20  --  Bradenton,  FL  --  Peggy Paregien and Mee Yean Chin
2016--0305   March 20  --  Bradenton,  FL  --  Mee Yean Chin and Rick Dorricott

2016--0306  --  Bradenton,  FL  -- Charlotte Richardson

This is Peggy’s sister, a full-time resident of Indianapolis and a seasonal resident in a MHP on south Tamiami Trail in Sarasota. 

2016--0308  --  Bradenton,  FL  -- wild bird feeding

2016--0310  --  Sarasota, FL  --  Marina Jack's  --  Liz Terpstra and Tracy Carson  - by Peggy Paregien

2016--0311  --  Sarasota, FL  --  Marina Jack's  --  Evelyn Sklair  - by Peggy Paregien

2016--0312  --  Sarasota, FL  --  Marina Jack's  --  Jean L'Huillier  - by Peggy Paregien

2016--0319  --  Sarasota, FL  --  Marina Jack's  --  Jean L'Huillier and Peggy Paregien

2016--0325   April 27  --  Obituaries for both the Republican and the Democratic Party  --  politics

What a wierd and wacky political world we have currently in the U.S.A. The Democrats and the Republicans have looked through their entire rosters of bright, new political stars to bring forward as their presidential nominees . . . and, instead , . . . they trot out two old geezers (I can say that because I are one) who are each egotistic, power-hungry bottom-feeders.  Lord, have mercy, is this the best and brightest that America has to offer? It is a sad state of affairs.

Several decades ago, now, I saw the two presidential candidates as totally unacceptable. So I wrote in my choice for a more intelligent, energetic and personable candidate: Mickey Mouse. Hey, I’m serious here. Ol’ Mick just might get my vote, again.

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The marathon travel season is coming nearer and nearer for Peggy and myself. Soon I will be flying to the St. Louis area to witness our son, Stan (aka “Gene”) Paregien Jr., and his lovely and talented wife Becky as they renew their wedding vows on their 30th anniversary. We are exceptionally proud of both their personal and professional lives. They are making a positive difference in the lives of people around them.

That same week my lovely wife, Peggy, is running away from our home. Okay, she is flying not running. A friend invited her to go with her–as her guest–on a ship cruise which lives from Barcelona, Spain and 12 days later ends in Rome. In between they are going to two or three more ports of Spain, then to Gibraltar, and on to Monte Carlo (home of the late Princess Grace), and then to Florence, Italy. 

We take a short breather here at home after she gets back. And then the two of us will fly from here to Toronto and then on to Glascow, Scotland. We will spent 10 days there with a friend who will not only be our host but also our guide to the best things to see and do on the western and central part of Scotland. That will be a really special trip.

Then in the early fall we will both fly north to the St. Louis area for the wedding of our #4 grandchild, Daniel Justin Paregien, and his girlfriend. A couple of days later, we fly from there to Greenville, North Carolina. That’s when my cousin and his wife will meet us and take us up to their time-share at a beautiful resort on Lake Lure.  Take a look at the Town of Lake Lure web site to get an idea of the strikingly lovely mountains and the lake:  http://www.townoflakelure.com/

Add to that a possible week-long trip to either Minnesota or to Wisconsin (two states we have not yet visited) and maybe, just maybe at least a one-week or more visit to Costa Rica, one of the jewels of Central America. We should be back in our little seaside shack in time to welcome back many of our snowbird friends from Yankee Land or even further up, in Canada.

All of that travel is dependent upon whether the Good Lord is willin’ and whether the creeks rise, as folks used to commonly say. Lot of truth in it.

Oh, by the way, if you haven’t already done so . . . , please go to the top right of this page and sign up to receive a free email to simply notify you each time I post an article.

Best wishes to one and all.

— Stan

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Issue 324 – Life In Florida, Part 2

The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 324  –  February 15, 2016

Stan Paregien, Editor

Life In Florida, Part 2

Ah, yes, life is very good here in Paradise. Our few days of mild winter provide plenty of ammunition with which to gig our snow-bound friends and relatives in the northern two-thirds of the U.S.A.

Florida  --  we salt Margaritas, not driveways

Florida  -- we love winters in Florida

The Gulf of Mexico, seven miles west of our house here, is normally a pretty tame body of water with “waves” more like ripples seen on large lakes elsewhere. The shore on this, the west-central side of Florida, stretches into long vistas of sparkling white sand (i.e., ground-up coquina shells) spiked with azure blue waters, palm trees and masses of sea grapes. The beautifully landscaped estates of the Big Boys who live on Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key provide we commoners with views of exotic plants and a rainbow of colors as we drive by their gated palaces. The pervasive eye candy is inspiring.

Then there are the friendships quickly forged in our 55+ communities because, for the most part, we are a people detached from our roots and friends and relatives back in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachussetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and Oklahoma. Oklahoma? Yes, a few of us from Oklahoma chose Florida rather than south Texas, New Mexico or Arizona. Anyhow, we are all pretty much in the same boat: we came here with hopes of making new friends. And it happens pretty quickly as we start out with, “And where did you live before moving here?” 

Oh, hey, did I mention the weather here in west-central Florida? Mercy sakes, friends, that is why we moved here. We may on a rare winter morning need an ice-scraper for our windshields, but we sold our snow blowers and snow shovels and snow mobiles before we left home. And we gave our thermal underwear, heavy wool shirts and down-filled jackets to others. 

Florida  --  winter-clothes-in-florida

Now our standard apparel amounts to flip flops (our old hippies among us instantly feel right at home), T-shirts and bermuda shorts or cut-off jeans. If we are going to go to a formal occasion, like  church or a wedding or out to a fancy restaurant, we wear flowery shirts with colars (to look like the other tourists and newcomers) and leather sandals with no socks. You may buy clothing like this at very expensive stores, or do what most of us down here do — roam the many thrift stores for bargains. Hey, “we are on limited incomes, down here” we’d have you know. And Florida state officials would say, “But you have no state income tax down here.” Right. But that is not the end of that story, as states without state income taxes always find “fees” and such to pick our pockets to achieve the same result.

‘Nuff of that.

This time I want to share some photos of the Dark Side of Florida. Oops, I mean the far side of Florida. You know, the east-central part. Peggy and I recently got a nice taste of it, while visiting friends in Jupiter and relatives in West Palm Beach. So hang on, here we go.

2016--0050      Map -- Jan 25  --  Trip from Bradenton to Jupiter, FL

2016--0051--B      Jan 25  --  Lighthouse at Jupiter, FL

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In the photo above, you’ll see a cluster of the beautiful sea grape bushes that abound here.

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We have been friends with Darrell and Martha Russell since 1996. That’s when Martha and Peggy started to work for Southwest Airlines in their national reservations call center just north of the airport in Oklahoma City. Those two ladies carpooled for nearly 14 years, so they got to know each other pretty darned well.

The four of us have leaned on each other as we have gone through illnesses, unemployment, retirement, moving away from Oklahoma (Darrell kindly drove our overloaded U-Haul truck most of the way),  and the daily bumps and bruises of life. They’re solid citizens, good Christan folk and we love ’em. Well, except maybe for their choice of sports wear. I did graduate work toward a Ph.D. at the University of Oklahoma and, try though I might, I can’t seem to convince them that OU’s maroon and cream is a lot prettier than OSU orange and white.

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Then the next day, Darrell and Martha Russell drove us around to see the sights. Lots of tall office buildings and fabulously expensive estates mostly hidden behind gated walls.

However, we did get to tour the little “cracker house” of the late Henry Flagler. This was a guy who, as a young man, had the good sense to go to Ohio and get into a new venture with another young businessman. Their adventure involved something that was not even known about by many other folks, but the two had a vision of the necessity it would become. We’re talking here about oil. You see, ol’ Henry hooked up with a young dreamer named . . . John D. Rockefeller. Their company became the Standard Oil Company, with Henry owning 25 %. Each man earned a reputation as an infamous “Robber Baron.” 

Of course, when your personal wealth exceeds the assets of many state governments that allows you to be creative and even generous. Flagler had the strange idea that he could turn a little mosquito-infested village in northeast Florida into a tourist mecca. No, he did not build a “field of dreams” baseball diamond (like Kevin Coster did in the movie) to see if they would come. He did build two luxurious hotels in Saint Augustine, and then of all things, he built his own railroad from Jacksonville to there so his large number of rich friends from back east and the midwest could vacation in the fashion to which they were accustomed. And it work very well, thank you. 

Then he invested in developments in the Miami area, far south of Saint Augustine. And then he connected his railroad on down to that soon-to-be tourist mecca. Eventually, he was daring enough to build the Florida East Coast Railroad Line all the way down across the various keys and the long stretches of open water all the way to Key West, Florida. That was in 1912. Wow, what an achievement.

Flagler died in 1913 from a fall onto the marble steps at his mansion.  Maybe it was just as well, because only 22 years later his railroad empire died. That was the year a terrible hurricane destroyed most of it and the lives of hundreds of his workers. 

You understand, now, how this man could afford to build such a palatial house for his wife. He called it, “Whitehall.” It is magnificently appointed inside as well.

 

2016--0062      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0063      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0064      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0065      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0066      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0067      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0068      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0069      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0070      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0072      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0071      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0073      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

 

2016--0075      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

2016--0084      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

 

2016--0077      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

 

2016--0081      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

2016--0082      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

 

2016--0083      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

 

2016--0098     modern map of the Florida Keys

2016--0080      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

2016--0095     painting of train running at night

2016--0094     book cover

Then came the horrible hurrican of Labor Day, 1935

2016--0087      Jan 26  --  Palm Beach, FL --  The Flagler Museum   -- Stan Paregien

2016--0088      1935 -- hurrican damage at Islamorado - body

2016--0089      1935 -- hurrican damage

2016--0090      1935 -- hurrican damage -- evacuation train derailed

 

2016--0092     1935 -- hurrican damage -- decomposing bodies found

2016--0093     1935 -- hurrican damage -- mass burials were necessary

2016--0091     1935 -- hurrican damage --

 

2016--0098     modern map of the Florida Keys

florida-keys_jpg

2016--0097     1935 -- railroad logo

2016--0100     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien2016--0101     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0102     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0103     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

Flagler hired a full-time organist to be available at a moment’s notice to play for the family and/or their guests.

2016--0105     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

“Boys will be boys, especially around girls.”

2016--0106     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

2016--0107     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

2016--0108     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0109     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0110     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0111     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0112     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0116     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0118     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0117     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

2016--0121     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0129     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0115     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0128     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0127     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0130     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0126     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0123     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0132     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0122     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0124     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0131     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

 

2016--0132     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0133     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0136     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0137     Jan 26  Flagler Museum -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0140     Jan 26  The Breakers Hotel, started by Henry Flagler

2016--0141     Jan 26  Palm Beach, FL  --  The Breakers Hotel  --   copyrighted by Stan Paregien

2016--0142     Jan 26  Palm Beach, FL  --  The Breakers Hotel  --   copyrighted by Stan Paregien

We left West Palm Beach about 9 a.m. in the middle of a pouring  down rain, with the report of a tornado not far away. We had to get off of the highway in Coral Springs and wait for the storm to let up a bit.

Then we continued over to Naples and spent the night there. We paid “seasonal price” for our room, meaning much higher than normal. 

2016--0145  --  Florida map  -- central area  --  03   West Palm Beach to Naples

Anywho, . . . it was an interesting trip. Our thanks to our friends in Jupiter, Darrell and Martha Russell, for giving us the grand tour. And our thanks to Peggy’s neice, Joy Gardner Lombardi and husband Mark, for their hospitality.

END.

 

 

 

Issue 317 – Family & Friends in 2015

The Paregien Journal   –   Issue 317    –    Dec. 18, 2015

Stan Paregien, Editor

FAMILY AND FRIENDS IN 2015

In the course of a year, a person who travels even a little bit will meet a lot of interesting folks. Some are witting and charming, others are self-centered and obnoxious, while most are somewhere in between.

The fact is, though, that the really important people in our lives are a fairly small number of family members and friends. And it is to those precious few that I dedicate this page.

NOTE: Please know that those who fit into one or both of those categories of “family” and “friends”  are not necessarily in the photos below. I did not have recent photos of many of you, nor did I have space enough to include all. Kind of a nice problem to have, really. 

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Becky & Stan Paregien Jr in Waterloo, Illinois – March, 2015

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0465   2015-03--28   -- Little Gasparilla Island  - Jean Pendergrass - Shirley Cook  -- by Peggy Paregien

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0045   2015--02--12   - Bradenton,  FL - Don Betts' 83rd birthday - by Jim Parker

This is a group of Christian men who meet in Bradenton each Thursday morning for a “show and tell” brunch. The man at left is a visitor, then (clockwise) are Jim Waid, Clay Landes, Mike Cook (sunglasses), Stan Paregien, Don Betts, Mike Sirus and Rom “Hollywood” Colella. 

 

0041   2015--01--31 - Abe Guillermo and Jean Pendergrass, friends since 1953 - he died Feb 10, 2015

Abe was a native of Hawaii. As a 9-year-old boy, he watched from his family’s farm as the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. Abe graduated to heaven this year.

Guillermo, Abraham M  -- Memorial Service -- 2015--03--17  Page 1 of 5Guillermo, Abraham M  -- Memorial Service -- 2015--03--17  Page 2 of 5

2015--04--05--A10    Bradenton, FL - Easter Sunrise on the Riverwalk -- Bonnie Hamill and P Paregien by S Paregien2015--04--05--B1 -- Washington, DC -- Major Stan Paregien Jr - USAFR2015--04--22   02   Bradenton, FL -- Al Good turned 90 -- by Virgina Corbin

Geri Mack watches as husband Al Mack cuts the cake on his 90th birthday. Bradenton, FL – 2015 –  Photo by Stan Paregien

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2015--04--18   B05  Sheridan, AR --  Dominic, Jodi, Peg, Bailee -  by Stan Paregien2015--04--21   D-04  Tulsa, Ok - Peg Paregien, Maynard and Sue Hammans - by S Paregien2015--04--22  A01B  Cleveland, OK -- Verdonn and Sharron Blevins2015--04--23  A05  Edmond, OK - Paregiens and Arringtons and Sengs

2015--04--24  A28  Edmond, OK -   -- Jean Ndayisaba with relatives and P and S Paregien

2015--04--27   2   Stratford, OK  -- David and Patsy Bryan - by Peggy Paregien2015--04--27   3   Stratford, OK  -- David and Patsy Bryan - by Peggy Paregien2015--04--28   A01B  Snook, TX  -- Stacy P Magness - by Stan Paregien2015--04--28   A02  Snook, TX  -- Christal - Peg - Dylan - Stan - by Stacy Magness

2015--05--08   B03   Bradenton, FL -- Clay Landes and others at a jam -- by Peggy Paregien2015--05--08   B06   Bradenton, FL -- Rod Myers at a jam -- by Peggy Paregien

2015--05--17    A01   Bradenton, FL  --  Ronnie and Carole Colella2015--05--18  B1   Joplin, MO -- Victor and Evelyn Knowles

Victor and Evelyn Knowles – Joplin, MO – 2015

V2015--05--07   03   Rwanda, Africa  -- Bryan and Holly Hixson - 24 Anniversary2015--05--25   B05 -- Bradenton, FL  --  Virginia Corbin, P Paregien and dogs  -- by S Paregien

Our dear neighbor, Virginia Corbin with her dog Buddy, and Peggy Paregien with her dog Allie. 2015 – Bradenton, FL – by Stan Paregien

2015--05--08   A01-2   Anna Maria Island, FL -- Martha and Darrell Russell -- by Peggy Paregien

2015--05--23   A07   Stroud, OK - 30th Reunion of the Class of 1985  - Stan JR - Joe Bob Cornett

2015--06--05   A02-A  -- Roberta Fournier's obituary, 1943 to 20152015--06--05   A02-B  -- Roberta Fournier's obituary, 1943 to 2015

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2015--07--04   A02   Bradenton, FL  -- PG MHP luncheon -- Jean and Bob L'Hullier  -- by Stan Paregien

1876  --  2015--06   Bradenton, FL -- DJ and Ray Multer  -- by Peggy Paregien

1822 -- 2015--08--04  A04  Bradenton, FL -  neighbor Ray Multer died at age 75

1933  2015-08-13 --  Bradenton, FL -- Rom Colella, Don Betts -- by S Paregien

1966  --  St Petersburg, FL - Ft Desoto Park -- Sept 2, 2015 -- Lynne and Ed Hutchinson with Peggy Paregien  - by Stan Paregien1992  --  2015--09--05  Sarasota, FL - Rod Myers presiding at Clay and Pat Landes' 50th Anniversary --  by Stan Paregien2002  --  2015--09--05  Sarasota, FL - Clay and Pat Landes' 50th Anniversary --  by Stan Paregien2011  --  2015--09--05  Sarasota, FL - Clay and Pat Landes' 50th Anniversary --  by Stan Paregien2012  --  2015--09--05  Sarasota, FL - Clay Landes with Peggy Paregien --  by Stan Paregien2031  --  2015--09--06   Waterloo, IL  - Stan Paregien and new toy, a Delorean

Our Number One Son with a new toy: a DeLorean

2035  --  2015--09--23   Bradenton, FL - Smiths - Karin - Jean Pendergrass2037  --  2015--09--22  Jennifer B Morton, Carol B Tiger and Jami B McDonald2037  --  2015--09--22D  Carol Bond Tiger and her children2046  --  2015 - Marilyn and Kent Abel on a cruise2047  --  2015 - Oregon -- Paula King and sons Kevin, Karsen, Woody and Jeff

2015--10--12   2086  Sedona, AZ -- Judy and Don Betts  - by Stan Paregient2015--10--12   2135--C  Sedona, AZ  -  Courthouse Butte   -  copyrighted by Stan Paregien2015--10--13   2167--N   Sedona, AZ  -   Stan Paregien and Don Betts -  copyrighted by Peg Paregien2015--10--14   2209   Sedona, AZ  -   Slide Rock Park  -  copyrighted by Stan Paregien2015--10--16   2442--F    Cottonwood, AZ  - Blazin' M Ranch - Stan Paregien, Don Betts - by Peg Paregien

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2015--12--12   2726    Bradenton, FL --  Christmas Dinner

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End.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issue 307 – Marco Rubio — Part 1 of His Life