Category Archives: American culture

Issue 365 – Jacob Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 365  –  October 12, 2017

 

Jacob Mac Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

Paregien, Jacob M - no exiting photo -- maybe looking something like this in about 1866

 

 How Jacob might have looked at about age 50.

Introduction

I compiled the first Paregien Family History and published it in February of 1974. There were only a few people who were really involved besides me. That small number included my mom, Evelyn Paregien, my sister, Roberta Fournier, and Melvin Pearigen, Jewel Paregien Smith and Eura Paregien. That was about it. And those last three have been gone a long time now.

Thankfully, there were others who stepped up this time and gave me a hand. I especially want to thank Marie Paregien Walker, Roberta Paregien Fournier, Jan Harris Warner, Sandra Paregien Dudley, Marie Clark Palm, Amanda Pearigen, Kathy Peargin, Shirley Paregien Barrett and Clayton Moorman.

Are there typographical errors in this history? Are there factual errors in it? Do some families have much more material than others? Could it have been organized differently? Could it have been printed as a hardbound book rather than sold in the CD format?

Well, the answer to all those questions is “Yes”. And not just “Yes,” but “Heck, yes!”

The organization, final typing and editing has been a one-person project of monumental proportion. And I accept the blame for any errors or typos.

As to the format, I would welcome anyone who has deep pockets and wants to step up and put up the money to have it published as a standard book. But not many of us could afford something that would cost well over $150 each copy. So I chose to do it this way. Each person can print out the entire CD and put it in two or three three-ring binders, thus having a nice and quite functional copy. Or one may take it to a print shop and have them print it out and give it a professional binding and, . . . shazam! . . . , have a real book. Or some may choose to just print out the section dealing with their particular branch of the family. There is great flexibility, so it is your choice.

As to some families having much more material in the book than others, the fact is that some families simply donated more information and more photos than others did. Some lines did not provide any information or photos at all. None. Nada. Zip. So the minimum information that is contained here was all I could find. My goal all along was to be as inclusive as possible.  And it is.

Deciding how to organize this history was a much more difficult task than you might first think. After much consideration, it seemed to me that the best way to organize this book would be to first present the history of our patriarch, Jacob Mac Paregien, and his  thirteen (yes, 13) biological children and three stepchildren in the first section, called “Our Roots”. The remaining individuals and/or families then will follow in alphabetical order by their legal names at birth. So that is what I have done.

You will see markers such as [2001-027] in the captions next to most of the photographs and illustrations. That is simply my personal method of indexing my large collection of photographs and graphics. When the date in the caption does not match the date of the marker, the date in the caption is most reliable.

It may be helpful for you to start this history by studying the Overview, at the end of this section. That will help you to see how the different “pieces” or families fit together.  

Folks, this is about it for me. I have put much of my life into collecting information and photos of the Paregien family. It has been a rewarding and satisfying experience, but it has consumed about enough of my time and energy. There are other things in life that I still want to do.

So with this book I am passing the torch to whoever has the interest and the dedication and the love of history to take up the challenge. I’ll be glad to help those who have questions, but what you see in print here is virtually everything that I know about the family. And when I don’t work with the information regularly, it sure fades fast.

Finally, I want to dedicate this book to three very important and special women in my life: my wife and best friend, Peggy Allen Paregien;  my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling; and my sister, Roberta Paregien Fournier.

Happy reading,

Stan Paregien

March 1, 2006

Part 1:    1816  to  1857

It is thought that Jacob Mac Paregien was born on April 12, 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. We do not know the names of his parents. Jacob stated in a U.S. Federal Census for 1880 that his father was from Ireland and his mother from South Carolina.      [With the publication of this history in 2006, I am passing the genealogical torch to the next generation. Perhaps they can trace our roots back to our European origin. –SP]

The 1860 U.S. Census of Jackson County, Ill., listed Jacob “Paragen” (age 44) and married as having been born in Kentucky. But the family tradition, at least for the Frank Paregien branch and the Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine branch,  is that Jacob was born in Northern Ireland and came to the U.S. as a stowaway at the age of 14 (about 1830).

The Family Search Ancestral File (ID # 10511984) says that “Jacob M. Paregin” was born in 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. Please be advised that you will find the name Paregien spelled 50 different ways, due to the particular writer’s indifference or literacy.

The major town, today, in Warren County is Bowling Green (the county seat). Ironically, in 1962-63 Stan Paregien traveled to Bowling Green, Kentucky from Nashville every Sunday for about a year. He preached for a little country congregation, Mars Hill Church of Christ, outside of Bowling Green. He had no idea, back then, that he was near the birthplace of his great-great-grandfather.

Map -- Bowling Green, KY -- 2017

Warren county was formed in 1797. It is located in the Pennyrile and Western coal field regions of the state. The elevation in the county ranges from 395 to 955 feet above sea level.

Nancy Baird wrote this of  Bowling Green (Warren County), Kentucky: “In 1821 the Bank of the Commonwealth established a branch office on the square and by 1827 the town boasted a locally owned newspaper, a resident physician, a private school for boys (a school for girls opened in the Presbyterian Church in the mid 1820s), a Masonic lodge, at least one church, two tiny hotels, a number of mercantile shops and an array of other business establishments. Most structures housing a commercial venture also served as a residence for the owner. The courthouse provided meeting space for congregations without buildings and numerous rural log structures provided space for both school and church meetings. A stagecoach line connecting Bowling Green to Louisville, Nashville and Hopkinsville rumbled into town three times a week to discharge and pick up the mail and passengers. The round trip between Bowling Green and Louisville (180 miles) took three days and cost $12.

“From its inception Warren County’s residents depended on the Barren River as an avenue for commerce. In the winter when the river was high, flatboats loaded with tobacco, ham, whiskey and other farm produce began the arduous trip from a warehouse on the river’s edge to New Orleans. The flatboat journey down river and return by wagon or on foot (steamboats did not paddle up the Mississippi and Ohio until after 1814) required about six months. Goods not produced locally came by wagon from Louisville or Nashville on roads that were little better than an animal path, an erratic and expensive mode of freighting.

“After the advent of the steamboat on the Ohio River, local businessmen urged that the narrow, winding, snag-filled Green and Barren rivers be improved sufficiently for steamboats to ascend to Bowling Green. Without such river trade, warned a newspaper editor, “we can never be independent or prosperous.” Discussions and delays followed but eventually a company of young volunteers cleared the worst snags and overhanging trees. In January 1828 a tiny, single stack steamboat, the United States, arrived at Bowling Green and its cargo of a few boxes of sugar, tea, coffee and other items was unloaded and displayed on the riverbank. A local miss later recalled that she could not believe that so much could ever be consumed by the town’s residents.

“During the 1830s the state authorized improvements on the Green and Barren and eventually provided for the construction of locks and dams. On the completion of these projects, paddle wheelers could ply upriver to the Bowling Green boat landing.” (from A HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY)

1840

Jacob Paregien was living near Murphysboro in Jackson County, Ill., when the 1840 census was taken. He may have bought land in Section 31, W/SE sometime prior (Saline Land Grant). That record, taken by Dr. John Logan,, lists “Jacob Peregin” and a white female as living in “Township 7 — Ora”. There is an “Ora” township just north of the “Oraville” community on the Jackson County map.

Murphysboro, IL - Welcome sign - 2017

Welcome sign for Murphysboro, Illinois

Murphysboro, IL - map of Illinois with star on Murphysboro

Map of Illinois, with Myrphysboro at the bottom.

Map -- Murphysboro in Jackson County, IL and surrounding area

Map of the region around Jackson County, Illinois

Map -- Jackson County, IL                               Map of Jackson County, Illinois with Myrphysboro as the County Seat   

Dr. John Logan donated twenty acres of land for a new county seat in Murphrysboro, Jackson County, Ill., in August of 1843.

Jacob M. Paregien’s first marriage was to Nancy Morgan (born 9 April, 1821 or 1822  in Warren County, Kentucky). Her father was  Robert H. Morgan and he was born 19 March, 1786 in North Carolina. Robert Morgan  married Hannah Moyers Myers on  5 Feb., 1812 in Warren County, Kentucky. She had been born about 1794 in Tenn. The web site of Warren County Genealogical Society has her name spelled as “Hanniah Mires,” but the date is the same (http://www.burgoo.com/). Robert Morgan died in September, 1855 in Jackson County, Ill.

Nancy Morgan’s siblings were: Margaret Morgan (born 1826 in Kentucky), Martha Jane Morgan (born 25 Feb., 1825 in Warren County, Ken.; died 13 Sept., 1948 in Jackson County, Ill.)

Jacob and Nancy (Morgan) Paregien had nine children. We only have a photo of one of these nine children, James A. Paregien.

  1. William H. Paregien

William H. Paregien was born 23 Nov., 1837 . He was born in Missouri, according to the 1840 U.S. Census for Jackson County, Ill.  He married Huldah McCann on 11 Jan., 1859. — Jackson County Illinois Marriages: 1857-1866, p. 27).

(Also: See the information below on the 1860 Census, below, which states that at age 23 he was living with his wife, “Huldy” and daughter Elizabeth in Jackson County).

On 21 Sept., 1852, William Paregien bought 40.12 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W. Then on 30 Sept., 1852 William Paregien bought .12 acres of land for $1.25 in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

28 Jan., 1876   –   A 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

  1. James Alexander Paregien

James Alexander Paregien was born 21 March, 1841 in Murphysboro, Ill. (State of birth so noted in the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Ill.).

See more under a separate listing for James A. Paregien in Chapters 4-8.

  1. Mary Jane Paregien

Mary Jane Paregien was born 24 June, 1844. At the tender age of 14, she married James Ward on 25 Nov., 1858. (Marriages Index, Jackson County Courthouse, p. 37).

The 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows a Mary Ward, born in Illinois in 1844, married to a John Ward (blacksmith). That may or may not be our Mary Jane Paregien Ward.

It is important not to confuse this Mary Paregien, born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien, with the Mary A. Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien.

  1. Emily Elizabeth Paregien

She was born 30 Dec., 1845 in Missouri (according to the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois).The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin“, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township.

It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township.

[The 1870 Census for Lauderdale, Alabama (Township 2, Range 8) lists an Eliza Peregin, age 36, born in 1833 in Alabama. It also lists a Nancy Peregin, age 1, born in 1868 in Alabama as living in the same Township.]

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien, age 27,  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien) was married to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

There is no listing for them anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census that I can find. Both the names Richard Connell and Elizabeth Connell are very common.

  1. Sarah A. Paregien

Sarah A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien on 10 March, 1849 (??) in Missouri (according to 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois). There is no mention of her in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, anywhere.

There is no mention of a Sarah A. Paregien anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, when her father and stepmother and several siblings were living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. She would have been 31 years of age then.

  1. Robert H. Paregien

Robert H. Paregien was born 24 March, 1849 in Jackson County, Ill. He died in 1857 at about age 8. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has his name as Robert F. Paregin.

  1. Louise E. Paregien

Louise (or perhaps Louisa) E. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien  on 26 Dec., 1851. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has her first name as Louisa and says she was born in 1853 in Jackson County, Ill.

She married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869.

  1. Samuel M. Paregien

Samuel M. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien on 10 Feb., 1853. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has him born in 1855 in Jackson County, Ill. The 1910 U.S. Federal Census has him born in 1852

One source says Samuel died 4 May, 1864, but I don’t think that is correct. Can a dead man get married? Perhaps. Or, more likely, he really did not die in 1864. There was a Samuel Paregien who married Mary C. Davis (Index to Female Marriages, Jackson County Marriages, Book 2, 121).

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for his father,  “J.M. Paregien

However, the 1880 U.S. Census shows Samuel Paregien, age 26, living with his parents and other relatives in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

In 1907 there was a Samuel Paregien who owned land in Kincaid Township, IS, Range 4W of the 3rd PM, Block 24. The land is west of Kincaid Lake (The lake is man-made and was not there in those days) and is now owned by the U.S. Forest Service.

The 1910 United States Federal Census for Jackson County shows Samuel M. Paregien, age 57 (born in 1852 in Illinois), as living in Kincaid Township.

There is a  Sam Perigen  listed as buried in the Kincaid Cemetery.

  1. Thomas J. Paregien

Thomas J. Paregien was the final child born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien. He was born 20 Nov., 1854 in Jackson County, Ill. Could his full name have been Thomas Jefferson Paregien? It was common to name children after presidents or prominent people. Thomas J. Paregien died at age four, on 21 Feb., 1859, probably in Jackson County, Illinois.

___________

 

The 1830 Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows that there were only 86 white residents in the county who were over 50 years of age. The life span was not that great, back then. There were a total of 1,768 white residents and 62 black residents.

The 1840 Census Record taken by Dr. John Logan lists a “Jacob Peregin” and a white female in Jackson County, Illinois (Township 7 – Ora; sheet 11). This document was found at www.rootsweb.com/~iljackson/1840.html. There is a community north of Murphysboro named Oraville.

The 1850 U.S. Census Record shows Arys Parmley being married to Daniel, in the Jacksonville area [My sister, Robert Paregien Fournier, found this entry]

The web site for Illinois Land Purchases shows that Jacob “McParegien” bought a parcel of “Federal sale” land in a sale dated 28 April, 1853. And he bought another on 30 April, 1853.  The April 30 document says it was a Federal sale in which he bought .38 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NESW, Range 02W, for $1.25.  Jacob Paregien is also listed as “Jacob M. Paragin” (Township 7S, Range 2W,  Sec 31 WSE) and as Jacob “Peregin”.

On 26 Feb., 1855 “Jacob McParigren” was listed in a probate hearing as the executor of the will for a Mr. Samuel Perry (will on file at Southern Illinois University Library, File 1775).

It was on 3 Nov., 1855 that the probate of the will of  Daniel Parmlee was filed (File #1777), with the executor being Jesse W. Ward.  This was, no doubt, Daniel Parmley, the deceased husband of  Avis Parmley ( She then became Jacob Paregien’s second wife).

Jacob’s first wife , Nancy Morgan Paregien, died on 19 Dec., 1856 (just one year after her father died). Probably in Jackson County, Illinois.  [RESEARCH NOTE: Where is she buried?]

Overview

 Jacob M. Paregien & Nancy Morgan had 9 children (listed chronologically):

          William H. Paregien

          James A. Paregien 

          Mary Jane Paregien

          Emily Elizabeth Paregien

          Sarah A. Paregien

          Robert H. Paregien

          Louise E. Paregien

          Samuel M. Paregien

          Thomas J. Paregien

Jacob M. Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, had 4 children:

          Nancy Paregien

          Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (changed his name to PAREGINE)  

          Mary A. Paregien

          Henry Clay Paregien (changed his name to PEARIGEN)

 

James A. Paregien (son of Jacob) and Harriet Brummett had 9 children:

            Hariett E. Paregien

            James Edward “Bud” Paregien

            George Walter Paregien

            Emey Evaline Paregien

            Jefferson Mac (“Jeff”) Paregien

            William Marion (“Will”) Paregien

            Alruettir Paregien

            Nancy Paregien

            Benjamin Franklin (“Frank”) Paregien

Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob) married Anton “Ollie” Guion and had 3 children:

            May Guion

            Maud Guion

            Thomas Guion

 

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine* (son of Jacob) married Celia Lowe and they had one child:

            Edd Paregine

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine and his 2nd wife, Mollie Mary Brooks Payne, had 3 children:

            Lillian Mary Paregine

            William Mack Paregine

            Grace Olive Paregine

Henry Clay Pearigen (son of Jacob) married Sarah Evangeline Taylor and they had 5 children:

            Eldora Pearigen

            Bird McKinley Pearigen

            Melvin L. Paregien

            Girl who died in infancy

            Another child

 

James Edward “Bud” Paregien married Julie Copeland and they had 1 child:

            William Reece Paregien (he began spelling his name as PEARGIN). He

                     married Lulu Lawson and they had 5 children:

            Marvin Peargin

            Douglas Peargin

            Orie Peargin

            William Olan Peargin

            Creda Peargin

            Richard Odell Peargin

James Edward Paregien and his 2nd wife had 1 and possibly 2 children:

            Bertha Paregien

            Warner (or maybe William) Paregien (??)

 Part 1 of 3 

 

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Issue 364 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    —    Issue 364    —    September 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3 of 3

[See Parts 1 and 2 for earlier portions of the story of our evacuation from Bradenton, Florida due to the imminent arrival of Hurricane Irma.]

On Thursday, Sept. 14th, we made a mad dash from our motel in Lexington, Kentucky about 20 miles west to visit Frankfort, Kentucky. That is where the state’s capital is, plus that is where the grave of he one-of-a-kind American hero Daniel Boone is buried. The first place we went was to the final resting place of Daniel Boone and his beloved wife Rebecca. A tall, impressively carved marker stands in the beautiful and historic cemetery across the Kentucky River on a bluff which looks out upon the State Capital.

2017--09--14 06--D Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--14 06--A Frankfort, KY - grave stone of Daniel Boone -2017--09--14 06--B Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--C Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--F Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--G Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--H Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--J Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 07--A Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--B Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--C Frankfort, KY - Ky Historical Society Bldg Quote from Happy Chandler - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--D Frankfort, KY - First Baptist Church building - by Sttan Paregien

Then we drove up to Williamstown, Kentucky. Never got to see the town itself. But we saw what draws many hundreds of people every day to the edge of town. Just off I-75 is an attraction named “Ark Encounter.” A bunch of some bodies invested a ton of money in this project. Taking the actual dimensions given in the Old Testament of Noah’s Ark, they built a 510 foot arch, with a ground floor devoted to a huge gift shop, some meeting room, etc. Then the ark itself — with all the birds and beasts and such all arranged two by two — takes up three full floors. We walked ourselves silly and were amazed by all of the displays and exhibits. We probably spent three hours or so there.

However, if you’re a serious student of the Bible and/or archeology and such, you really ought to buy a two-day pass. Then pace yourself by maybe spending two hours there on the first morning and after lunch another two hours. Same thing for the second day. My bet is you won’t even be able to see it all even then. It is H-U-G-E, as a car dealer in the Tampa area likes to shout in his commercials.

2017--09--14 11 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 12 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 13 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 14 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 15 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 16--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - by Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Stan and Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 17 Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien

After seeing the Ark Encounter, we had planned on driving on up to Indianapolis to visit Peggy’s eldest sister, Mrs. Charlotte Allen Richardson and her husband Bill. We thought we might spent a couple of nights there, then wander west to our son’s house near St. Louis for the duration of our evacuation from Florida. That is, we did not want to start back until we were sure we had our electricity back on and that food and gas supplies were adequate.

However, about then we got a call from a neighbor back home in Bradenton. She gave us the exciting news that our electricity had been restored (it had been off since last Sunday night). And she said it looked like our house had only very minor damages.

Hallelujah! Those were the words we were waiting to hear. We did a quick u-turn and headed back to Florida. However, I did not want to drive down I-75 again. So we went slightly west toward Nashville and I-65. We spent Thursday night in a very busy, small town named Franklin, Kentucky, right on I-65. We had perhaps the best night of sleep since we had been forced out of our home by Hurricane Irma.

On Friday, Sept. 15th, we left Franklin, Kentucky about 8:30 pm and drove through some patches of fog on the way down to Nashville. Getting through congested “Music City” was no easy task, but I guess it did prepare us for what was coming next.

After actually looking at a map and seeing that the lower part of I-65 took us way west toward Mississippi, we decided to boogie back over to Chattanooga and join back up with . . . yep, . . . I-75. There is some major road construction going on in Chattanooga, so it was stop and go all the way.

When we got to I-75. the pace of the hordes of southbound traffic moved along pretty well for the most part. That is, until we got to Hell. Yeah, you know — Hell, Georgia. Oh, okay, you may know it better as Atlanta. But I’m here to tell you that driving through Atlanta from 2:15 pm to 5:30 pm is as close as I want to get to hell.

2017--09--15 10 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--15 11 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

There were six lanes of traffic going each direction, but it all was going at the speed of a senior citizen snail. It was bad. No it was downright awful. I have driven in a lot of big cities — Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, St. Louis, Montgomery, Indianapolis, Columbus, and more. But I ain’t never in all my born days driven in anything that could compare to the helter-skelter of Atlanta. I came away from that white-knuckle experience crying, “No mas! No more! Never again!” Or to paraphrase the great Chief Joseph of Idaho’s Nez Pierce tribe who finally admitted defeat at the hands of the U.S. Army. He said, “As long as the grass grows and the water flows, I will fight no more forever.” And I said as I exited Atlanta, “As long as I am half-way sane, I will drive no more forever in Atlanta.” Amen and Amen!

We were physically and emotionally exhausted when we finally got to our . . . eh, well . . . 3rd rate motel in Macon, Georgia. After a few $160 per night hotels we just had to take something cheaper. It turned out to be okay. Certainly nothing fancy about the room, and the continental breakfast the next morning left much to be desired. But it was a bed and the room was air-conditioned . . . and they allowed pets. 

We set our alarm for 5:30 am on Saturday, Sept. 16th. And we hit the blacktop on I-75 at 6:40 am. We were going home. Nothing quite like that feeling after so many one-or-two night stands. There were pockets of very heavy traffic, especially about 11 am at all six exits or so to Gainesville. We wondered why the heck the traffic was backed up so far. And, bingo, we remember that the University of Florida “Gators” had a home football game that afternoon.

Amazingly, we managed to average about 66 mph on Saturday’s travel. We drove into our driveway about 2:00 pm.

2017--07--17 03 Cartoon - even anti-government folks ask for help after a disaster

2017--09--17 01 Bradenton, FL - Cartoon - linemen were heroes

2017--09--17 02 Bradenton, FL - home damaged - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--19 01 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--19 02 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

Yes, we did see a lot of trees down along the roads, all the way from central Georgia to Bradenton. And some of the residents in our 55+ community had some significant damage, with maybe 25 families still without electricity. Florida’s sauna-like summer heat and humidity are terrible for anyone without air conditioning, but it is especially hard on young children and on seniors. But, all in all, we were thankful the hurricane had not made a direct landing here.

Be it ever so humble, it is always a good feeling to get back home. And it is especially wonderful when the house that you half-way expected to lose in a massive storm surge of water is still in tact. Thank you, Lord.

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Issue 363 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

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The Paregien Journal   —    Issue 363    —    Sept. 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

You will recalled that we evacuated from our manufactured home community in Bradenton, Florida on Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 5th, and ran for the north country.

We spent a delightful two days with my cousin Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in their home on a hill in Kingsport, Tenn. That’s when the weather folks began  forecasting heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday, Sept. 12th. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

We decided to drive up to Corbin, Kentucky — hometown of two great Americans, Colonel Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame and our friend Mike Cook (a leading proponent of Bigfoot theories) of Sarasota. First, though we drove through miles and miles of Tennessee mountains with occasional rain and gusty winds. 

2017--09--12 01 Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-A Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-B Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-C Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

Actually, we barely went through the edge of Corbin as we drove 15 miles west to beautiful Cumberland Falls. We spent Tuesday night, Sept. 12th, there at the lodge.

2017--09--12 05 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 06 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 07 Corbin, KY - Colonel Sanders and KFC

2017--09--12 08 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 09 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 10 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 11 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 12 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 13 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 14 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 15 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 16 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 17 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 18 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 19 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien2017--09--12 20 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 21 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 22 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 23 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 24 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 25 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Stan & Peg Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 27 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 28 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 29 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 30 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 31 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 32 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 33 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 34 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 35 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 36 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 37 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 38 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 39 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 41 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 42 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 43 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien

2017--09--12 45 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 49 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien - by StanParegien

This was our second visit to Cumberland Falls. Our first one was almost 55 years ago, in the late spring of 1963. I was a student minister preaching for my first congregation — the Mars Hill Church of Christ northwest of Bowling Green, Kentucky. I am happy to report that the old church building, surrounded by fields of tobacco, is still being used (the congregation was founded in 1912). Anyway, one Saturday that we took three girls from our congregation with us for a day at Cumberland Falls. We all waded way out toward the middle of the Cumberland River (don’t try that downstream at Nashville) on solid stone. There was a lot more water that year than was flowing this time, but it was still beautiful.

Here are about all the photos we have related to the little rural church in the tobacco field almost due west of Bowling Green, Kentucky (though on the photos I put either southwest or southeast — guess I’m a bit directionally challenged).

1962-061 PeggyParegien-Stan formal--01

This is our formal wedding photo. As I recall, I had Peggy — who had worked for about a year after high school as a cosmotologist in Ventura, Calif. — cut my hair in a burr style, to say money on haircuts. I don’t recall how long that lasted. As I recall, it made me look a lot like one of the guys in the Three Stooges films — so it probably didn’t last long.

1962-093--A--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-093--B--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--A PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--B PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--C PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--A Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--B Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-096--Peg'sSSClass-BowlingGreenKY

1962-097 Map-BowlingGreenKY

1963-013 CumberlandFallsKY

1963-014 PegParegien CumberlandFallsKY

1963-016 BowlingGreenKY

1963-017 Sweat-RobertsFamily BowlingGreenKY

On the left, as I recall (and my recaller is badly bent, if not broken), is Mr. Roberts (father, I believe of the legendary Kentuck high school band teacher Joe Van Roberts). Next is Mr. Sweat. And the other man, at the far right, I think is Joe Thompson. I wouldn’t swear to this in any court of law, however.

On Wednesday, Sept. 13th, we had barely left the lodge when it began to rain. And rain and rain.  Hard rain, driving rain. You see, once in a while the weatherman gets it exactly right.

Frankly, I was worn out by the time we got to Lexington. So we checked into a motel and crashed for the afternoon and night. And it continued to rain most of the evening.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of “Fleeing Hurricane Irma.”

— Stan

 

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Issue 362 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal    –    Issue 362    –    September 21, 2017 

When “Hurricane Irma” became more than a run-of-the-mill tropical storm, the weather forecasters began to speak of it in superlatives. “Greatest storm in a hundred years.” “Larger than the state of Texas” (yep, that’s large alright). “Highest wind speed for a hurricane ever recorded.” “Catastrophic water surges followed by giant waves of 30 feet or higher.” “Total and complete destruction possible.”

Kinda makes a non-Floridian nervous.

2017--09--04 Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--A Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--B Hurricane Irma fast approaching US

That’s what happened to Peggy and me. We were going about our business as usual on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 5th. In fact, we were planning on flying out of Tampa on Thursday morning to spend the weekend in Lubbock, Texas. I was scheduled for my 17th year of performing my cowboy poetry and stories at the National Cowboy Symposium at the Civic Center in Lubbock. I hadn’t been in about six years, so I was getting excited about seeing many of my cowboy pals and palettes (yeah, I know, I invented that one).

That did not happen. About noon Peggy came into my study and told me that Governor Scott had just declared a state of emergency in Florida. They were expecting Hurricane Irma to rip through Florida like a chainsaw, leaving death and destruction in her wake.

It didn’t take us long to figure out that by now we had not one chance in heck of flying “standby” anywhere (Peggy worked for Southwest Airlines for some 15 years and earned us free — i.e., standby — flying privileges wherever SWA goes). All flights out of Tampa would be full of paying passengers, no doubt.

Then there was the additional problem of what to do with our dog Bullet. Oh, wait a minute, that was the name of Roy Rogers’ German shepherd. Our little Pomeranian is Allie, and we did not want to leave her behind in harm’s way.

So, with all other options ruled out, we hastily packed a few clothes, our important papers, plus some food and water and such. And, to get a start on what by Wednesday morning would become a marathon snail race, we left in our trusty Kia Sedona van by 3:00 p.m.

We spent Tuesday night at a high-dollar motel in Lake City, Florida, just a few miles south of the Georgia border. There were at least 10 other dogs staying in our doggie motel that night.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6th, we left Lake City, Florida about 8:30 p.m. and joined the heavy traffic headed north to who knows where. Our destination was the home where our long-time friends Darrel and Martha Russell live with their daughter and son-in-law and their boy (Christie, Todd & T.J.). They were all so gracious in putting us up for a couple of nights. We even spent some time perusing a very large antique shop in an old cotton mill in the town of Social Circle, Georgia. Check it out on a map, and you’ll see that the city limits is nearly a perfect circle. Why, I don’t know, even though I asked a few people. Must be a story there.

2017--09--06 Manatee County Preparing for Hurricane Irma - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--07 01--A Social Circle, GA - home of Darrel and Martha Russell - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--07 01--B Social Circle, GA - plaque - Psalm 93 v 04 by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 Old couple at a shelter in Bradenton, FL - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--09 US Rep Vern Buchanan visits Manatee County on Friday, Sept 8

2017--09--09 What to take to a shelter & what to expect - Bradenton Fl Herald

On Friday, Sept. 8th, the forecasters were saying that this part of Georgia could soon expect heavy rain and high winds . . . followed by widespread power outages. So we decided it was time to mosey on a bit further north. Peggy spent more than an hour on the phone trying to book a motel room in Chattanooga. None was available. Nary a single pad. Little did we know, in addition to the untold hundreds of refugees like us, they were hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. So Peggy finally found us a room about 40 miles further up the road at Cleveland, Tennessee.

We took a long way around Atlanta, to keep from fighting that urban traffic. We saw a few scenic spots, traveling the back two-lane and sometimes four-lane roads of rural Georgia. But mostly we saw stoplights and lots of lumber trucks and innumerable strip retail shops and such.

We finally arrived in Cleveland, Tennessee and checked into our motel. It was located right next to paradise, which is to say, next to a Cracker Barrel restaurant. We were a good little boy and girl, though, and avoided our normal “Southern comfort” foods. I’m about six weeks from my next doctor’s appointment and I am determined to exceed his recommendation for me to shed at least 20 pounds (over a 3 month period).

Soon after we had arrived, Peggy discovered that the little meeting we had with a strip of blown truck tire back near Lake City had not just put a dent in our passenger door . . . but it had knocked the peawadden out of the turn sign assembly on the front, passenger side of our car. It was just dangling by a thread. But, using virtually all of my mechanical skills, I found a bungee cord in my tool box. I flawlessly attached one end to a motor mount inside the engine compartment, stretched it down over our grill and expertly attached it to the assembly. Ah, the satisfaction of a job well done. For a while, anyway.

Saturday, Sept. 9th, dawned with a stunningly beautiful day. We left our dog in her large cage in our motel room, and we retraced our steps back to Chattanooga with a list of several things we wanted to see and do. As we approached the downtown area, near the area along the Tennessee River, we noticed how athletic all these Chattanooganites looks. Both men and women were slim and muscled up, with fancy athletic shoes, colorful athletic shorts and shirts, and even with athletic looking bicycles — some with tires no wider than my thumb.

Duh. Then we found out the city was hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. Hundreds of certified athletes and thousands of fans and families crowded the area we had to pass through. There were barricades everywhere so the public could not cross a street during a bycicyle race (not a good idea) or a foot race. We also got to see these way-too-fit folks swimming across the Tennessee River, when they all no doubt had perfectly good swmming pools back at their motels.

Well, here is where the plot thickens. As we were trying to get through this mass of athletic folks, Peggy missed seeing a step down off a curb and hurt her left foot. Not her ankle, the side of her foot. She was in considerable pain, but managed to hobble on down to the river — through three or four of those barriers — to where we bought tickets for the luncheon cruise aboard the Southern Belle Riverboat.

Since her foot was hurting and we were boxed in by the sports activities, we sat at that location for about an hour. Finally, we loaded onto the Riverboat. They had a big and private birthday party going on upstairs, but on the main deck there were probably only about 15 of us. But, off we went. It was a nice little river tour, with a guide giving some history of what we saw.

2017--09--09 05 Chattanooga, TN - World Championship Ironman and Ironwoman contest

2017--09--09 15 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River

2017--09--09 18 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 19 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 20 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

About two hours later, we discovered as we prepared to leave that Peggy’s foot was so swollen and sore that she absolutely could not walk. We informed the boat’s staff of what had happened and our predicament. There was no way she could climb the steep hill up to where all the events were going on. Nor could she manuever through the crowds, nor could she get far enough for me to bring our car close enough to pick her up.

After about 45 minutes of waiting for help, one of the uniformed boat staff — perhaps a captain himself — took a personal interest in our dilemma. He finally agreed to procure a golf cart and give both of us a ride to the streets up above. So this man named Daniel, dressed in a sharp uniform which perhaps passed for an official of some kind, weaved the cart through the barricades and up past the crowd. He even drove about three city blocks, on the public streets, to get to a corner parking spot about two blocks from our car. So, showing my own athleticism (I hate that word and other “ism’s” just like it), I sucked in my stomach and sorta jogged a lot of the way — even up hill — to get our car. I drove down and “Captain Daniel” helped Peggy into the car while I waved the impatient drivers around us. Bless you, Daniel, you were wonderful.

So we high-tailed it out of Chattanooga as fast as the numerous areas under construction and the heavy load of traffic would allow. I managed to get Peggy from the car to our motel room, then I skedaddled a couple of miles down the road to a CVS because they had a practical nurse on duty there. Right. Except, . . . that she had gone to supper right before I arrived. So I bought about $70 of home remedies and hurried back to the motel and put some ice on Peggy’s foot. That seemed to help, but all other activities were out.

We we were “forced” to sit in the room and eat the Sonic burgers I had picked up on the way back from CVS, . . . while we watched our University of Oklahoma “Sooners” (ranked Number 7 at the time) gave #2 ranked Ohio State “Buckeyes” a spanking they won’t soon forget.

In between plays and during the commercials, we watched the weather bulletins. And Hurricane Irma was shifting further west, away from Miami and headed directly toward Tampa (and us at Bradenton). Yikes. And to make matters even more interesting, they had warnings of heavy rain and high winds there in Cleveland, Tenn.

2017--09--09 05 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 1 of 2

2017--09--09 06 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 2 of 2

So . . . we phoned my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in Kingsport, Tennessee (in the northeast corner near Bristol Speedway) and pleaded on bended knees for them to put up a couple of refugees. Now, the Paregien family — our Paregien grandparents (Frank and Mattie) as well as Jerry’s mom and dad and my own mom and dad — know all about being refugees in a foreign country. They all left poverty-stricken Oklahoma in 1942 and moved to Ventura County, California in hopes of getting work in the war industry. And they did exactly that, and their lives and those of their descendants changed dramatically. They all went to work for the U.S. Navy at Port Hueneme (near Oxnard).

Anyway, Jerry and Muriel graciously agreed to take us in as long as we wanted or needed to stay. So we again loaded up Allie and our stuff, leaving Cleveland about 8:00 am on Sunday morning, Sept. 10th. We passed Knoxville and about the time we were to turn north, off of I-40, we saw a sign saying that Sevierville was just 15 miles on east. So we decided to take a quick tour. We stopped at a really beautiful Visitor’s Center and got a bunch of brochures.

That’s when one of the employees walked over the ladies who were helping me and told them their manager had called and said they would shut down at noon Monday because the National Park Service was shutting down the area parks because of dire predictions of heavy rain, high winds and probably trees falling and power losses.

That sure explained why we had seen a mob of cars and RVs headed out of Sevierville as we were headed into town. Now my momma didn’t raise no dummies, so I changed our plans and got right back on the road to Kingsport.

2017--09--10 08 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--10 09 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

We spent a delightful time with Jerry and Muriel in their hillbilly home. Well, okay, it is beautiful and spacious home on a hill, not a cramped log cabin by any means. We spent Sunday night and Monday night there. On Monday I took our car down to a nearby mechanic and he was able to stabilize the turn signal assembly . . . by putting a second bungee cord on it. Naw, not really. He was able to snap it back together for a temporary fix, as it is cracked and some “teeth” are missing.

However, the weather folks were now forecasting those same heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

Well, friends, we’ll continue the story of our evacuation from Florida in our next issue.

Thanks for stopping by.

— Stan Paregien

 

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Issue 361 – The Vietnam War

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 361  –  September 17, 2017

The Vietnam War

Tonight, Sept. 17, 2017 our local cable station will air on one of our PBS stations another new film series by master storyteller Ken Burns. Mr. Burns previously did such outstanding documentaries as “The Great Depression” and “The Civil War.” This one is no doubt his most controversial one of any he has done. It is titled “The Vietnam War.”

Vietnam War - Photos - 01 -- SV Police Chief killed Viet Cong suspect in Saigon in 1968

Vietnam War - Photos - 02 -- a SV plane Accidental dropped napalm on people, including 9 yr old Kim Phuc

Vietnam War - Photos - 03 -- American soldier in 1965 with 'War is Hell' on his helmet

Vietnam War - Photos - 04 -- Anti-war in Vietnam march in 1969 drew 400,000 people

Vietnam War - Photos - 05 -- American soldier saving 2 V children from danger

I plan to watch every hour of it, so that means a total investment over the next few weeks of 18 hours. Of course, if you miss it the first time around, it will be playing again in your area sometime in a year or two and periodically until Vietnam, . . . er, I mean . . . Hell freezes over.

There are lessons to be learned about our world, our nation and about ourselves if we will just pay attention. Here is some information about it:

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 1

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 2

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 3

The Vietnam War by Ken Burns -- intro to 2017 series

 

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Issue 359 – Back in the Saddle, Again

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A Periodic Publication    –    Issue 359    –    Augtust 9, 2017

The National Cowboy Symposium will be having its 29th annual celebration of all things cowboy – music, poetry, papers, chuck wagon cookoff, cowboy church on Sunday morning – preceeded by authentic chuck wagon cooking in 40 or so dutch oven (iron kettles) placed on coals on the ground (north of the Civic Center).  It is a busy place, with 6 stages running programs at the same time all day Friday and Saturday. Then they have a major show in the evening on Friday and Saturday nights from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. in the big auditorium. This event draws thousands of people to the Civic Center there in Lubbock, Texas each year. The date is Thursday evening, Sept. 7 through Sunday morning, Sept. 10th.

I just received word that I have been invited to perform there, again. This is, as best I can figure, my 17th  year to be one of the maybe 75 to 100 entertainers. My first year to perform, thanks to the Director – Alvin Davis – was in 1991. As you can tell from the photo, below, things have changed a wee bit. But I still have that “Tom Mix Grizzly Hat” I bought that year.

1991--002--StanParegien--PatsyMontana--Lubbock

Stan Paregien with singer, actress Patsy Montana in 1991

1991--035--LubbockTX--NatCowboySymposium---RichardFarnsworth----bySP

Movie stunt man and actor Richard Farnsworth

1991--036--LubbockTX--NatCowboySymposium---R-W-Hampton--BarryCorbin----bySP

Singer R.W. Hampton and actor Barry Corbin

1992--043--TX--Lubbock--Flether Jowers - Stan Paregien - Nat Cowboy Sym - by PP

Fletcher Jowers with Stan Paregien in 1992

 

1995--011--TX--Lubbock-- actor Barry Corbin -- Stan ParegienActor Barry Corbin with Stan Paregien

1998--043-- actor - Dale Robertson with Stan Paregien -- Lubbock, TX

Actor Dale Robertson with Stan Paregien in 1998

 

1999-030-- Lubbock, TX -- Natl Cowboy Symposium -- Stan Paregien with Elmer Kelton

Stan Paregien with famed Western novelist Elmer Kelton in 1999

 

1999-038-- LubbockTX -- Natl Cowboy Symposium -- Stan Paregien and Curt Brummett -- by Peggy Paregien

Stan Paregien with cowboy humorist and author Curt Brummett in 1999

 

2000-011--TX-Lubbock--DustyRichards-PaulPatterson-StanParegien

Western novelist Dusty Richards with Paul Patterson (author and humorist; and Elmer Kelton’s beloved high school teacher) and Stan Paregien in 2000

 

2002-056-- Lubbock, TX - June 9 - Will and Rhonda Stearns - Stan Paregien - National Cowboy Symposium - by P Paregien

Rancher and rodeo star Will Stearns and and wife/rancher/author/poet Rhonda (Sedgwick) Starnes with Stan Paregien in 2002

 

2002-060--A Lubbock, TX - James Drury - Stan Paregien - by P Paregien - June

Actor James Drury of “The Virginian” TV show with Stan Paregien in 2002

 

2006-1150-A Paregien-Stan Peg

Stan & Peggy Paregien

 

2006-1166 Smith-Dean Brimley-Wilford

Olympics track star, movie stunt man and actor Dean Smith with actor Wilford Brimley in 2006.

 

2007-1313--E--TX--Lubbock--Bumgarder-Paregien-Lopez

Cowboy poets: Scott Bumgardner, Stan Paregien & Adrian Lopez in 2007

2009-1127-D-StanParegien---byNCS

Stan Paregien in 2009

 

2011--1511--TX--Lubbock--NCS--Stan-PegParegien--Sept-10

Stan & Peggy Paregien in 2011

On Friday my first performance will be in a “Stories & Poetry” session in Civic Center Room 107. Others include Carol Glover of Amarillo, TX and June Cathey of Martin, TX. 

My second performance on Friday will be at 4:00 p.m. in a “Music” session in the Civic Center – Banquet drag” (i.e., bringing up the rear) at an outdoor “Music” session from 11 a.m. to 1:50 (long session). It will be in the “North Park” (just north of the Civic Center) at the Outdoor Stage. Those performing will be Craig Cortes and Zack Carey of Marathon, TX; Allan Chapman & Rodeo Kate of Ft. Worth; Stan Mahler of Olney, TX; Sid Hausman of NM; Bill Cate of Cleburne, TX; Mary Kaye of Escalante, UT; and your’s truly.

Then at 3:00 pm I will perform at a “Stories & Poetry” session in Room 107 of the Civic Center. Others performing will be ol’ saddle pal Roff Flake of Gilbert, AZ; and Gary Penny of Lorena, TX.

And my last performance will be at 4:00 pm in a “Poetry & Stories” session in the Civic Center, Banquet Hall 1-West. Other performers include David Hansford,  Ft. Worth, TX; and Jeff Posey of Ft. Worth, TX.

Y’all come, if you can. The host hotel, where a great many of the performs will stay (including Peggy and me), is the MCM Elegante Hotel & Suites (formerly the Holiday Inn Hotel & Towers) at 801 Avenue Q in Lubbock (directly west of and near the Civic Center). 806-763-1200

I have placed online nearly 100 photos of me and folks I have met at the National Cowboy Symposium since 1991. Counting the 29th event this September, I will have had the pleasure and honor of performing  at 17 or so of those annual events. I started when I was “not-so-old” and now I’m one of the senior Senior Citizens still telling stories and reciting poetry and doing a little music, all of the cowboy kind, of course. You may see all those photos at my Flickr account in the album titled “National Cowboy Symposium.” That is at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/111910623@N04/albums

 

Sam Elliott and “The Hero,”

His Latest Movie

Today, Aug. 9 th is the birthday of actor and all-around good guy Sam Elliott. Happy birthday, Sam, . . . and salute! He was born in 1944 in that old cow town of . . . Sacramento, CA. He started in films in 1969 and married Katharine Ross in 1984. Their stable marriage is unusual in glitzy Hollywood.

The first photo, above, shows Sam Elliott dressed in his familiar cowboy gear, as he had done a lot of  fine Western roles over the years (“The Sacketts,” “Tombstone,” etc. The second photo is of Sam and his lovely and talented wife, actress Katherine Ross. She is best known for her first major role years ago as the love interest for both Paul Newman and Robert Redford in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” Ironically, Sam was in that movie as well, but they never got a chance to meet during the filming. 

Ol’ Sam, with his deep and roughly melodious voice, has made a sizeable amount of money over the years doing voice over commercials for such outfits as the Dodge Ram pickup, the American Beef Raisers (“Beef. It’s what’s for supper.”), and others. He has worked pretty doggone steadily through all the years.

In my point of view, it is unfortunate that both Sam and Katharine (a minor role) got hooked up with the production of the 2017 movie, “The Hero.” The gist of the film is that he plays a has-been, once-famous cowboy actor who has reached old age with not much to show for it. He doesn’t have much money but he is able to drink like a fish and smoke pot to his heart’s content, a normal thing it seems . . . or at least there is no real objection to it. The self-center character has ruined his marriage with his wife (played by Katharine Ross), and made his daughter hate him with a deep passion. But he still has a few fans who stroke his ego from time to time. And he gets that old star-power feeling, temporarily, when a group of Western movie fans present him with their annual award at their convention. Yahoo. There is a constant street of vulgar language on the part of his character and that of a young woman — profane stand-up comedian — he beds down after he learns he is dying of cancer. Cut. And print. That’s about it.

This movie was a major disappointment for me. I felt sorry for Sam and Katharine for making such an odd, depressingly different film from previous ones. Frankly, I think the film had no redeeming virtues and I would warn fans of Sam to not get closer than the length of a football field from this dog. 

__________

 

Folks, Hold On to Your Forks!

by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Aug. 8, 2017

Lonesome Omar died a while back

At the ripe old age of ninety-one.

He had no health issue to speak of,

So I guess maybe his work was done.

 

I knew him for years before I learned

His full name was Omar O’Dell.

At cowboying he was mighty good,

Though in his youth he was wild as hell.

 

He had the rough edges knocked off

By the Lord and sweet Lilly Ann.

One winter he caught pneumonia and

A wild bronc smashed his fighting hand.

 

Lilly Ann was ol’ Doc Hester’s nurse,

And she nursed and loved on Omar

Until he caught and married Sweet Lil’,

And he took up church and left the bars.

 

The ranch foreman let ’em live in a cabin

A hundred yards from his big house.

And for three years they reveled in life,

And Omar thanked God for his sweet spouse.

 

Twice a year they hosted all the cowhands

To a meal featuring tasty beef or pork.

At the end, before desert, she always said:

“Folks, be sure to keep your fork.”

 

That always meant something mighty good

Was coming next, like maybe a pecan pie

Or a chocolate cake – Omar’s favorite –

Decorated to delight any cowpoke’s eye.

 

There was a pond fed by a year-round spring

Where she liked to relax, bath and swim.

They figured two moccasins bit her arm

And she was dying so a rider went after him.

 

She died just after Omar arrived at a run,

And she spoke slowly so he would understand:

“My love, remain true to our Lord and

“Please, bury me with a fork in my hand.”

 

They say that was the last time Omar cried,

But vowed to honor her dying request.

They buried her next day near the cabin and

In her right hand a fine silver fork did rest.

 Eating Utensils - Fork - fancy silver-looking on a brown bkground

Omar himself said a few words to the

Ranch folk on that solemn, sad day.

“Sweet Lilly led me to Christ and gave

“Her love to me in every single way.”

 

“We worshiped at Oak School House

“With church folk ever time we could.

“When we had dinners on the ground,

“They’d say, ‘Keep your fork, if ya would.'”

 

“By that they meant they was gonna

“Uncover a passel of dessert and such.

“It was gonna be something real good

“And we looked forward to it so much.”

 

“Sweet Lilly always liked that saying,

“And with guests at our cabin she’d blurt,

“‘You good folks, keep your fork!’

“Just before serving a fine dessert.”

 

“So yesterday I knew exactly what she meant

“When she asked to go with a fork in her hand.

“We both talked about loving each other more

“Up in heaven gathered in that promised land.”

 

Well sir, folks ’round  here in Post, Texas

Loved ol’ Lonesome Omar, a friend to all.

He never remarried and usually drank his

Evening coffee by Lilly’s marker so small.

 

Ol’ Omar sorta adopted me ’bout 40 years ago,

A kid who didn’t know straight up about a cow.

So the cowboy skills I’ve gained in my own  life

Were by Omar taking his time to show me how.

 

 One day on the range we paused under an oak

And he told ’bout his wife and made me take a vow.

He said not to have no grief when the Lord took him,

‘Cause he’ been ready to go after Lilly died, anyhow.

 

So when he died in his cabin at 91,  I knew

Exactly what he’d want us cowpokes to do.

We built him a casket, put an old fork in his hand,

And buried him next to Lilly in the morning dew.

 Eating Utensils -- Fork - an old three-sharp-pronged fork with a wood handle -- 02

Now neighbor, I don’t know what you’ll do,

But when I die and you lower me into the land,

I’d be mighty grateful to ya and plum proud

If’n you’d put an old fork in my right hand.

_____

I wrote this poem, my 476th, in Bradenton, FL

on Aug. 8, 2017. It is based on a story by an

unknown writer that was posted online on the

Guideposts web site on Nov. 23, 2010.

_______________________________________________________

See ya down  the trail.

—  Stan

End.

 

Issue 358 – Catching Up

The Paregien Journal    –   A Periodic Publication    –    Issue 358   –   July 29, 2017

Catching Up

In my last post, some 16 days ago, I mentioned that I hoped to get on a more regular posting schedule. My intent was to published each and Thursday. Obviously, that didn’t happen and I don’t expect it to happen in the future. 

You see, friends, shortly after that I saw my doctor for my regular 6-month check-up. I was shocked out of my Justin boots by his diagnosis. Full-blown diabetes and a low-functioning thyroid. He told me to change my diet and to lose at least 20 pounds in the next three months. Then I might make it without going on a diabetic routine of meds. He did put me on a pill for the low-thyroid functioning problem. I have noticed that for the last three months or more I just did not have much energy. Low-thyroid will do that. So I started this med and it has knocked me for a loop: a headache for several hours each and every day; frequent nausea; inability to sleep from early morning to 11 pm or so (I had loved my afternoon naps); and no decreasing of my fatigue. After two weeks, those three of those four side-effects have faded. I’m still waiting for it to give me more energy.

Anyway, now you know . . . the rest of the story.  I have sub-titled this blog as “A Periodic Publication.” And that’s about the best I can do for the foreseeable future. Thanks for your understanding. 

A Birthday Bash

We’re having another birthday party for a local celebrity here in Bradenton, Florida. It will happen on Saturday, July 20th. He is a very popular guy and lots of folks come from far and near to take photos of him. That “him” is none other than ol’ Snooty, who was born on July 21, 1948, back when Harry (“Give ‘Em Hell”) Truman was sitting in the White House as President of the U.S.A. He’s not as old as I am, of course, but he is now ancient compared to his peers.

Okay, I’ll tell you . . . the rest of the story. Snooty is a manatee who has lived in a manatee-sized pool in the South Florida Museum for a long, long time. He was born in the Miami Aquarium down south, but packed up his bags and more here at the age of one. The manatees who live wild along Florida’s shores are odd-looking creatures. In the wild, they seldom if ever live beyond their 20’s. Fast-moving boats kill or badly injure many of these gentle giants each year. 

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Oh, did you know that Bradenton is a city in “Manatee” County? Yep, and the first community was called Manatee but was swallowed up by a faster growing upstart. And our town sits on the south bank of “Manatee” River.” There are lots of those Manatee around, though I have yet to see one in the wild.

Anyway, happy birthday to you Snooty. 

UPDATE:

Unbelievably, Snooty the Manatee died one day after his 69th birthday party. That was on Sunday, July 23, 2017. Officials reported that somehow an access panel door to his pool or aquarium had somehow been knocked loose. The huge, gentle creature was able to go underwater and swim into the small enclosure. When he did not have room to turn around and reach air, again, he drowned. It is quite a tragedy for our community. And those who literally grew up seeing and enjoying Snooty a few times each year were especially saddened.

*****

I am certainly sad to learn that Arizona’s Senator John McCain has been diagnosed with a very aggressive kind of brain tumor called glioblastoma. I have great respect for Senator McCain, though I think he should have retired a few years ago. He spent five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, and he was severely tortured — physically and psychologically — by the Communists during that time. In my book he is a true American hero and a fine gentleman. We hope and pray for his recovery.

*****

I see in “Today’s Birthdays” for July 20th that novelist Cormac McCarthy is now 84. His first novel, The Orchard Keeper, was published in 1965. You probably know him for his 2005 novel, No Country for Old Men, which was adapted into an award-winning film by Joel and Ethan Coen. The movie starred Tommy Lee Jones and one of the supporting cast was a gent we have met a few times at cowboy events, actor Barry Corbin. In 2006, his novel The Road, won a Pulitzer Prize for Literature. And also in 2006 he finished writing a play, “The Sunset Limited.” That was made into an HBO film starring  Samuel L. Jackson and Tommy Lee Jones (directed by Jones).

In the birthdays for July 29th I see the name of none other than Leonard Leroy “Buddy” Lee, born on this date in 1933 and celebrating his 84th year on Mother Earth. Okay, you probably know him better by his stage name, “Robert Fuller.” In 1952, barely out of his teens, he moved to Hollywood to try his luck at acting. He also attended actor Richard Boone’s acting school and started to get small parts.  In 1959, Fuller wanted to do Westerns and came in 2nd to Michael Landon for the role of “Little Joe” Cartwright of the Bonanza TV show.  But he kept auditioning and won a co-starring role of Jess Harper on the TV Western, Laramie. It ran from 1959 to 1963, and Fuller made lots of money and lots of contacts in the movie industry.

Fuller, Robert - on TV show Laramie -- 2

Fuller appeared in numerous TV Westerns and movies after that. However, his next really successful and lucrative deal was a non-Western. Actor (remember “Dragnet”) and director Jack Webb pestered him until Fuller accepted a co-starring role in NBC’s “Emergency!,” a modern, fast-paced TV medical drama. He got the role of Dr. Kelly Brackett, Chief of Emergency Medicine at the fictitious Rampart General Hospital. And his co-star was the lovely, talented pop singer and actress Julie London, who was the ex-wife of director Jack Webb. She was Nurse Dixie McCall. That show ran for five years, from 1972 to 1977. Long retired, Robert Fuller lives in north Texas. 

2017--07--17 04 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

2017--07--17 03 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

This is the latest piece of business equipment (i.e., toy) purchased and painted and decaled by our son, Stan Paregien Jr. Are you ready for this? He also has an honest-to-Batman “batmobile” with a fake jet exhaust, a fully decorated “General Lee” as seen on Dukes of Hazard” TV show, an authentic DeLorean car with all of the “Back to the Future” gizmos inside and out a little VW all decked out as a Disney studio “love bug” with the number 53 on it. Yep. He is actually making a little money along the way by being paid by folks who want him to bring one of ’em to their corporate event, party, TV commercial and/or movie set. Not bad work if you can get it.

Well, folks, it is now 8:10 in the evening and I’ve been at this way too long. I had hoped to include more, but . . . I am plum tuckered out.

See ya next time.

— Stan

 

 

 

 

Issue 357 – We Enjoy Our Visitors

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The Paregien Journal   –   Issue 357   –   July 13, 2017

We Really Enjoy Our Visitors

During our marriage of 55+ years, Peggy and I have lived in several states and cities. I can safely say that none of them, except for our current home in Florida, has been known as a “tourist destination city.”  The region from Tampa, down through Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Bradenton, Sarasota, and Venice contains beautiful cities, beaches, museums and scores of other attractions. So hundreds of thousands of visitors flock here from all over the United States, Canada and Europe–especially during “the season” (November through April). 

Naturally, that old capitalism rule of “supply and demand” kicks in, with hotels raising their rates and still running at or near capacity, and restaurants hike their prices and still have waiting lines (even at . . . or maybe especially at . . . the “Early Bird Special” time of 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.). And then there is the additional traffic, . . . but don’t get me started on that.

So we are fortunate and happy to have a few more friends and relatives who come to visit us for a day several days. We are always glad host them and get caught up on their lives and the lives of our mutual friends. And we try to guide them to the best attractions in the area.

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Martha and Darrell Russell are very special friends of ours and have been for many years. We all met when Peggy and Martha each worked in the Southwest Airlines Reservation Center north of the airport in Oklahoma City. For several years, Peggy and Martha shared rides back and forth to work from our respective homes about 25 miles from the airport (in Edmond, Okla.). Then when we decided to move to Florida in June of 2013, these two generous souls volunteered to make the trip with us. In fact, Darrell had driven business-sized trucks for years and he accepted the role of chief driver of our rental truck. Martha and Peggy drove our van. 

Then a couple of years later they retired, sold their house, bought a Recreational Vehicle and started roaming all over the U.S. Then their daughter and son-in-law got transferred to Jupiter (over on Florida’s east coast; also where the aging movie star Burt Reynolds still lives) and they started living with there when not RV-ing. And just a few weeks ago, the whole crew moved to new digs up in Social Circle, Georgia. Google that town and scroll out and look at how the town is platted — in a doggone circle. Pretty strange.

Anyway, I think you catch my drift that we very much appreciate and love these two wonderful folks.

And, speaking of wonderful folks, . . . that leads us to James and Glenda Cotton of Edmond, Okla. 

2017--03--05 01A Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

We first met James and Glenda Cotton (of Marshall, Okla.) in a congregation in Oklahoma City where we were all attending. Since then, they have moved from her family farm to just on the far north side of Oklahoma City. We all four laugh all the time about how we were mismatched somewhere back in time, as Peggy and James share a great passion for searching for seashells and tinkering with stuff while Glenda and I are happy to watch the sunsets and read books. Last year Peggy and I rode with them from Edmond all the way through Texas and New Mexico up to Westcliffe, Colorado . . . to a friend’s cabin . . . and then took the long way home. Quite an adventure. And quite fantastic friends.

2017--03--26 02 Brian, Ruth, Muriel, Peg - Venice, FL - by Stan Paregien

Two of our newer retired friends who live in Venice are Dr. Brian and Ruth Smith, R.N. Before they were married, they each independently went to separate medical missions in Africa. A series of twists and turns took place, finally causing them to meet and to get married. They spent the last 20 years of their careers working in McAllen, Texas, moving to Venice in late 2015 or so for his health.

The photo above shows them with my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien (blue shirt) and his wife Muriel and with Peggy.  Both Jerry and I grew up a few miles apart in the wilds of Ventura County (just north of Malibu, etc.). He graduated (as did Peggy) from Ventura High School, while I graduated from Fillmore High School.  I had one sister, Roberta (“Berta”), but nary a single brother. Jerry has certainly filled that slot for me over the years, so I love him as my substitute physical brother and as my brother in Christ. It just doesn’t get much closer than that. 

Muriel and Peggy just seemed to hit it off from the first time they met. For one thing, they are both “P.K.’s.” Now those of you insiders in church circles know what that means. Each of them was a “preacher’s kid.” Muriel’s father, Dale Knowles, preached for ultra-conservative independent Christian Churches (and her brother, Victor Knowles, is a preacher and the long-time editor of ONE BODY, a magazine advocating Christian unity).  Peggy’s father, W.W. (“Woody”) Allen, preached for ultra-conservative Churches of Christ, mainly in Nebraska and in Ventura, Calif. But Muriel and Peggy share so many other interests that their relationship is very similar to that which Jerry and I have. 

2017--06--01 02 - Woody, Lisa, Ella King - Bradenton, FL - by Stan Paregien

Woody King is a son of Paula King and the late Bill King, making him a nephew to Peggy and to me. Woody’s parents farmed in Arizona and Texas, then moved to California and soon to Oklahoma’s oil patch(s), and in his adult life out to Portland, Oregon. Lisa’s parents live in Sarasota and it was Woody and Lisa’s wedding on beautiful Siesta Beach — attended by Peggy — that was a major influence in our moving to Florida. They have the one daughter, cute and smart little Ella. They work together as independent entrepreneurs.

Hey, here is a “blast from the past.”  This photo of Woody and others was taken at our little 10-acre “farm” northwest of Stroud, Okla., in 1981. I added the captions, of course.

1981--048--B---Woody-Gene-Evelyn-Chester-Jeff---StroudOK

That is my mom and step-father in back, and Woody’s younger brother Jeff at right.

2017--06--15 12 - Sarasota, FL - luncheon cruises - by Stan Paregien

Luncheon cruise on Sarasota Bay in mid-June, 2017

This photo is of Stan and Peggy Paregien with their one and only daughter, Mrs. John (Stacy Evelyn Paregien) Magness. Stacy (cook in a nursing home) and John (foreman for a company in the oil field service business) and their adult daughter Christal live in tiny Snook, Texas just west of Bryan/College Station (think “Texas A&M”).  They have lived in Texas all of their married lives. This was Stacy’s first trip to Florida. We hope someday, since her husband John refuses to fly at all, to hog-tie him and load him on a plane and get him here, too. Stacy, by the way, is our greatly loved “chosen child,” as we adopted her in Oklahoma when she was two years old. Their older child, Dylan, works with his father and lives in College Station with his girlfriend. Their first baby is a beautiful girl named Presleigh.

That is Stacy’s picture on the left, at about the same age as Presleigh.

The note in my newspaper for July 7th’s “Birthdays” included the one and only . . . Doc Sevrinsen. Okay, if you’re under 40 years of age you have probably never heard of him. But ol’ Doc, whose real name was Carl, turned 90 this year. He was the band leader during most of the years that Johnny Carson hosted “The Tonight Show” on TV. At one time he owned a horse ranch in Purcell, Oklahoma (which likes to call itself “The Quarter Horse Capital of the World”). He lives up in Webbed Foot Country (i.e., Oregon), and he still performs once in a while. He was especially noted for his wacky stage outfits and for his kinda “wacked out” stage persona, which I don’t know was for real or just an act. He was different, though.

Severinsen, Doc -- about 2016 -- trumpet player and band leader on NBC

Oh, and on July 7, 1954, that nobody truck driver from Tupelo, Mississippi actually conned some D.J. at WHBQ in Memphis to play his first record, “That’s All Right,” for the very first time. And the song was a heck of a lot more than “All Right.” Neither Sun Records nor the world of music would be the same for very long after that. I remember that this “rock ‘n roller” (or hillbilly rocker) in about 1955, when I was a student at Roosevelt Junior High School in Tulsa, came to town for a show. The place was mobbed. And the newspaper the next day on their front page had a photo of two or three of my female classmates trying to climb into Elvis Presley’s dressing room from a window on the outside wall. Ah, yes, the good ol’ days.

Presley, Elvis -- with his guitar in about 1955 - it is a 1955 Martin D-28 guitar

We had been giving some serious thought and discussion about flying to Japan to see that nation and to spent some time with our daughter-in-law Becky Paregien’s brother and sister-in-law, Mike and Tomoko McClain in the Hitachi coastal area north-east of Tokyo. . . .  . . Then, one of our Rwandan friends invited us to his wedding in September there in Rwanda, Africa. So we (mainly Peggy) shifted gears and started researching that trip, instead. The Rwanda trip was just too cost-prohibitive. So we (mainly Peggy) turned our attention back to that possible trip to Japan. After visiting with a travel agent, we decided the possible Japan trip was impossible for us. And for the same reasons:  $$$$$

So we have regrouped and are thinking of going two places instead of one: Paris and Rome.

Doesn’t that sound just wonderful?

Well, don’t get too excited. We’re talking (mostly joking) about driving to both Paris, Tennessee and Rome, Georgia. It would give us some bragging rights, if we just left off the state names. Then on second thought, . . . naw. Back to the drawing board.

Hey, we have a heck of a lot of fun with all of the folks here in our 55+ gated MHP, including such folks as long-time resident Pat Goeller. Read the sign on her shirt.

 

2017--04--11 01 Bradenton, FL - Pat Goeller - by S Paregien

Well, friends and neighbors, that’s it for this time. Thanks for stopping by and “Y’all come, ya hear?”

— Stan Paregien

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Issue 356 – Joy of Aging & Other Lies

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The Paregien Journal  –  www.paregien.com  –  Issue 356  –  July 6, 2017

The Joy of Aging & Other Lies

Okay, buckeroos and buckerettes, make sure your butt is firmly planted on your saddle and your boots are in your stirrups, and your age-spotted hands and arthritic fingers have a firm grip on your horse’s reins. We are about to take a ride down memory lane.

Only this won’t be your Grandma’s memory lane about all the veggies she and Grandpa used to gather from their big garden out back and how she “canned ’em” (i.e., pressure cooked them and put  them in quart jars) and stacked in the basement to be enjoyed some cold day in January. It is not about Grandpa’s musings about how unusually large the fish were that he used to catch in just a few hours at the lake. Nope, none of that stuff.

This little essay is about the here and now, about what a short time it took we old geezers to get from wherever we neaked through high school to the place far away where we live and how things have changed 360 degrees from then to right now. 

So I’ll say like they do on cable TV just before reporting on some awful story, “A fair warning. The content of this next report might be upsetting to some.” Yeah, right. Like to 99.9 percent of people with at least half-way functioning brain matter.

Let’s start with this little book:

1,003 Great Things About Getting Older

Birnbach, Lisa et al - 1,003 Great Things About Getting Older -- 1997 by MJF Books -- front cover

My wife Peggy, otherwise known as the World’s Greatest Optimist (aka “sweet thing”) gave me this little book a while back. I thought it was a joke book. You know, it says “1,003 Great Things About Getting Older” but you open it up and the pages are blank. Sorta like that one “Everything Your Daddy Told You About Women But You Forgot.” But, no, this one actually has pages filled with stuff.

Lisa Birnbach, Ann Hodgman, Patricia Mars and David Owen had their fingers in the pie when it came to compiling these gems of politically correct wisdom. So here are a few sayings to help you get through your first cup of coffee. My comments are in the brackets.

**** It doesn’t take so long for summer to come again. [Not a good thing here in Florida — SP]

****  You’ve paid off your student loans [unless you’re a doctor or a lawyer — SP]

****  You receive mail every day, even if it’s only catalogs and bills. [Yeah, and most of the catalogs are from nursing homes and hearing aide companies. — SP]

****  Your arthritis makes you less likely to lose your wedding ring. [Wrong. I lost mine while frolicking at the beach. “Flrolicking” at my age means wading knee-deep in the water when it is still cool (70’s) to avoid shock to the part of my anatomy which actually probably needss shock treatment — SP]

****  All moral issues are conveniently black and white. [Right. Except those which are not — SP]

****  Weekends suddenly have meaning. [Hey, weekends slip in and out like a thief in the night. I stopped wearing a wristwatch when I retired. Now that we’ve been retired in Florida for four years, I’m also gonna give up my calendar — SP]

****  Dental implants let you eat corn on the cob, again. [Thanks, but I was robbed by my last two dentists. So I’ll just sip soup through a straw. — SP]

****  By age 74, refilling the bird feeder is a good morning’s work. [That or changing a flat bicycle tire. — SP]

****  By age 88 you can still identify half the people in your photo albums. [Ah, ha. Got you there. I have converted most all of our photos to digital images, complete with the names and locations of the subjects. That is what has kept me out of the pool halls most of my life. And most of ’em — well over 13,000 — are stored not only on my computer but also online on my FLICKR account which has 1 Terrabyte of storage — SP]

****  By age 100, all your enemies are dead.

****  A  little sex goes a long way. [Darn it, speak up. Your little grandson Rex does what? — SP]

****  People get out of your way when you drive down the street. [Only the smart ones. — SP]

Men Will Understand This One

All Too Well

 

Medical - prostate_exam_ 04sign_100dpi

My cousin Jerry R. Paregien is my favorite patriot-in-exile from California. He and his wife have lived about 20 years now on a mountain outside of Kingsport, Tennessee. From their back balcony, they can look across a wide valley and see the beautiful Clinch Mountains of Virginia on the horizon to the north.

Like Steve Martin, Jerry is a wild and crazy guy. Though he is showing early signs of  . . .  eh, . . . dement- . . . eh, . . .  Alzhei . . . something or other, Why, that Prune Picker still remembers every joke he ever heard and delivers each punch like with vim and vigor. Actually, I don’t know whether he remembers any of those “farmer’s daughter and the salesman” jokes from our teenage years, but if he does he ain’t admitting to it.

Boys, now what I’m about to tell you is the gospel truth. ‘Cause I heard it directly from my ‘Cuz. And pert near everything he tells me is resonably precise. 

Medical - prostate exam -- 03 - doctor smiling

Jerry told me that a couple of years or so ago, his appointment with his doctor for his annual physical rolled around. When they called his name from the cattle corral (waiting room), one of their nurses took him aside and took his weight and vital signs (yes, he still has some). And she escorted him to the Great Waiting Room down the hall where he twittled his thumbs for 15 or 20 minutes.

Finally, the doctor came in and they exchanged pleasantries. The doc checked his chart and his medications and declared him not-exactly-brain-dead. Said he seemed to be in mite near perfect condition for an old man with not long to live on Mother Earth. 

Then the doc began to stammer and stutter and finally got out these dreaded few words that send a chill up the spine of any red-blooded American male. He said, “Well, Jerry, stand up, turn around  and drop your pants and BVD’s to your knees. Time for me to check where the sun don’t shine.”

Medical -- prostate exam -- DR - 'I don't enjoy them either'

Jerry turned his head around, as much as his arthritis would allow, and looked his doc in the face and said in his professional, deadpan comedian way: “Well, Dr. Jones, I should darn well hope you’re going to check my prostate. I didn’t wash my butt today, like this, for just anybody.”

When the doctor finally quit laughing, and after visiting that Dark Domain, he said to my ‘Cus: “Jerry, for years now I have kept a log of funny things that my clients say to me. You will be pleased to know that your comments will go down in history.”

Medical - prostate exam -- 02 - using a baseball glove

NOTE: The above cartoon is especially for my two old friends, Bob L’Huillier (Bradenton, FL) and Victor Knowles (Joplin, MO), who are devoted baseball fans. 

Carter, Jimmy -- The Virtues of Aging -- 1998 - NY Ballentine Publishing - page 01 - front coverCarter, Jimmy -- The Virtues of Aging -- 1998 - NY Ballentine Publishing - page 02 - back cover

Now surely all of you, well maybe not you young ‘un’s under 50 or so, remember ol’ Jimmy Carter, long-time peanut farmer from Plains, Georgia. He was born there on Oct. 1, 1924.

Now my Grandpa Paregien was a “yellow-dog” Democrat until his dying breath. Somehow I went down the Republican path. But I came through the wringer of the Hippie Years and the Anti-Vietnam War Years. So I did my own thing and I castigated my first vote for a Democrat when I voted for Jimmy Carter. I mean, gee whiz, after all the duds we’d had before, I felt we just couldn’t go wrong voting for a certified man of the soil, a tried and true peanut farmer. After all, a distant relative of mine — Johnny Walters of Wapanucka, Oklahoma–was “Peanut Farmer of the Year” one time in Johnston County.

Well, I’d admit I was wrong about that premise and have made two or maybe three fair-to-middlin’ mistakes since then. But how the heck was I to know that he was also an expert on atomic submarines and other useless stuff like that. Ignorance is often bliss, and I was in la-la-land that day I voted for Mr. Carter.

Shootfire, ol’ Jimmy was a sure ’nuff nice guy. He even taught a Sunday morning Bible class almost everywhere in the world he happened to be, and still teaches his “Adults 101” Bible Class today in Plains (they call it 101 because that’s about the average age of the class members). But even nice guys don’t necessarily make good presidents. Of course, comparing him to Donald J. Trump today I have to say that ol’ peanut farmer looks better and better.

Do you remember Jimmy Carter’s dear, free-spirited momma? Lillian Gordy Carter often shot from her lip, saying just whatever she wanted to say whether it was approved by the Southern Baptist Convention or by the Geneva Convention either one. She was a corker to be sure. And then there was Jimmy’s junior brother, good ol’ Bubba — no, wait a minute, it was Billy. Billy Carter, whose only claim to fame was getting his name on some beer cans — “Billy Beer.” They didn’t serve it in finer restaurants back then, but you might have been able to get one out in Luckenbach, Texas.

But I digress, as I’m prone to do.

Here are some of President Carter’s words of wisdom about the virtues of growing old. He is still a Card-Carrying Baptist so I hope the Lord will excuse him for stretching-the-blanket a bit” (as the old-time cowboys used to refer to any cowpoke who stretched the truth). Keep in mind this remarks are from his 1998 book, noted above.

“Even before leaving the White House, Rosalynn and I received a notice from the American Association of Retired Persons that we were qualified for membership, but we considered ourselves too young to face the stigma of senior citizenship. However, once back in Plains [Georgia, population 700 — SP] the point was to be driven home most firmly and clearly.

“We live 120 miles south of Atlanta and habitually drive back and forth toThe Carter Center and to Emory University, where I am a professor. One morning we left our house quite early and stopped to eat breakfast in Thomaston, Georgia, about halfway to Atlanta. There were four of us in the car, and we all ordered about the same thing. But when the waitress brought my bill, I noticed that it was less than the others. Perhaps seeking credit for being an honest customer, I called her back and began to tell her that she had made a mistake. An older farmer, dressed in overalls, was sitting at a nearby table and apparently overheard my conversation. He looked over at us and called out in a loud voice, ‘Your bill ain’t no mistake, Mr. President. Before eight o’clock they give free coffee to senior citizens.’

“A wave of laught began at our table, and it still resonated through the restaurant as I paid my bill and hurried back to the car. For several weeks afterward, every time we approached Thomaston I knew that someone would say, ‘Why don’t we stop here for breakfast? There’s free coffee for some of us!'” (pp. ix-x).

When Jimmy Carter was voted out of the Presidency, he and his wife found that their “Blind Trust Fund” had been badly managed and their home and farm in Plains were deeply in debt, too.  And then they faced another issue, as he tells it:

“There were other reasons as well why moving from Washington back to our home in Plains was not a pleasant experience. It was not easy to forget about the past, overcome our fear of the future, and concentrate on the present. In this small and tranquil place, it was naturual for us to assume–kike other retirees–that our productive lives were about over. Like many other involuntary retirees, we had to overcome our distress and make the best of the situation.

“When one of our friends pointed out that more than a third of American men in my age troup were retired, and that we could expect to live until we were eighty years old, I had one disturbing reaction: What was I going to do with the next twenty-five yeears?” ( pp. 2-3)

“. . . as we entered our seventies there was another potential threat to our happiness: the forced realization that both of us fit almost any definition of ‘old age.’ I guess it is unpleasant for any of us to face our inevitale gray or thinning hair and the tendency for our waistline to spread, especially when advancing years correspond to a reduced income. This brings a challenging but inevitable transition in our lives — from what we have been to a new type of existence as ‘senior citizens.'” (p. 8)

“So then, when are we old? The corrrect answer is that each of us is old when we think we are — when we accept an attitude of dormancy, dependence on others, a substantial limitation on our physical and mental activity, and restrictions on the number of other people with whom we interact. As I know from experience, this is not tied very closely to how many years we’ve lived.” ( p. 11)

“Driving on the interstate highway in Atlanta to go to The Carter Center, for several months we regularly passed a large billboard advertising country music. The sign said, ‘My wife ran off with my best friend, and I miss him.’ This doesn’t apply to us [i.e., he and Rosalynn]. We seem to be bound together with ever-increasing bonds as we’ve grown older and need each other more. When we are apart for just a day or so, I have the same hollow feeling of loneliness and unassuaged desire as when I was away at sea for a week or more during the first years of our marriage.” ( p. 39)

We’ll share more from this book in a future issue of THE PAREGIEN JOURNAL.

****

Well, here it is — another 4th of July. 

I’m sitting here looking at the “celebrity” birthdays for July 4th and, shazam, I do know more than a couple. Those include . . .  Eva Marie Saint (actress, 93), . . .  Gina Lollobrigida, atress, 90; as an early teen . . . or maybe a pre-teen, I fell in love with that beautiful lady on the flying trapeze in the movie starring she and Tony Curtis and Burt Lancaster, a for-real former circus trapeze star) . . . Neil Simon (90, playwright) . . . and that’s as “young” as I can recognize on the list. Of course, that doggone lists includes somebody named Malia Obama, age 19. Oh, wait a minute, I remember. Nah, never mind.

Then there was this historical oddity under “Today In History,” where on July 4, 1826 — exactly 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was adopted — two of our nation’s former presidents died, that being John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

Finally, on July 4, Charles Kuralt died in New York at the age of 62. You remember Charles Kuralt, don’t you? He was the CBS reporter who, with only his TV camerman/soundman as a companion, traveled the backroads of the United States. He was born Sept. 10, 1934 and died on July 4, 1997.

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“On the Road” was one of the most popular TV programs–actually, filler spots in the CBS news–that CBS had at the time. He always seemed so doggoned friendly, with a lot of homegrown wisdom, and he could sniff out a seemingly insignificant story and make it a masterpiece. Here are a few of his quotes:

The love of family and the admiration of friends is much more important than wealth and privilege.

 Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything.
The everyday kindness of the back roads more than makes up for the acts of greed in the headlines.

 

I recall, in particular, one time he and his cameraman were rolling down a back road in Tennessee or Kentucky . . . and Charles notes a bunch of clothes hanging out back of an old farm house (very few of those new-fangled “clothes dryers” out in the country). So he stopped and visited with the lady and her family and wound up with a very informative and enjoyable six minutes of film. He never won a Pulitzer Prize, but he was one heck of a fine reporter. We still miss you, Mr. Kuralt.

*****

Wise Words for the Young and the Old

From a Member of the Royal Family

 

Be generous: Invest in acts of charity.

Charity yields high returns.

 Don’t hoard your goods; spread them around.

Be a blessing to others. This could be your last night.

 

When the clouds are full of water, it rains.

When the wind blows down a tree, it lies where it falls.

Don’t sit there watching the wind. Do your own work.

Don’t stare at the clouds. Get on with your life.

 

Just as you’ll never understand  the mystery of life

forming in pregnant woman,

So you’ll never understand the mystery at work

in all that God does.

 

Go to work in the morning

and stick to it until evening without watching the clock.

You never know from moment to moment

how your work will turn out in the end.

Beauty in a sunny day - Ecclesiastes 11  

 Oh, how sweet the light of day,

And how wonderful to live in the sunshine!

Even if you live a long time, don’t take a single day for granted.

Take delight in each light-filled hour,

Remembering that there will also be many dark days

And that most of what comes your way is smoke.

 

 

You who are young, make the most of your youth..

Relish your youthful vigor.

Follow the impulses of your heart.

If something looks good to you, pursue it.

But know also that not just anything goes;

You have to answer to God for every last bit of it.

 

Live footloose and fancy-free  —

You won’t be young forever.

Youth lasts about as long as smoke.

 

Honor and enjoy your Creator while you’re still young,

Before the years take their toll and your vigor wanes,

Before your vision dims and the world blurs

And the winter years keep you close to the fire.

 

In old age, your body no longer serves you so well.

Muscles slacken, grip weakens, joints stiffen.

The shades are pulled down on the world.

You can’t come and go at will. Things grind to a halt.

The hum of the household fades away.

You are wakened now by bird-song.

 

 Aging -- Man - very old with white hair and beard -- 05-A copyrighted by Antonio Silvas

 

Hikes to the mountains are a thing of the past.

Even a stroll down the road has its terrors.

Your hair turns apple-blossom white,

Adorning a fragile and impotent matchstick body.

Yes, you’re well on your way to eternal rest,

While your friends make plans for your funeral.

 

Life, lovely while it lasts, is soon over.

Life as we know it, precious and beautiful, ends.

The body is put back in the same ground it came from.

The spirit returns to God, who first breathed it.

 

It’s all smoke, nothing but smoke.

The Quester says that everything’s smoke.

 

Besides being wise himself, the Quester also taught others

knowledge. He weighed, examined, and arranged many

proverbs. The Quester did his best to find the right words

and write the plain truth.

 

The words of the wise prod us to live well.

They’re like nails hammered home, holding life together.

They are given by God, the one Shepherd.

 

But regarding anything behind this, dear friend, go easy.

There’s no end to the publishing of books, and constant

study wears you out so you’re no good for anything else.

The last and final word is this:

 Fear God.

Do what he tells you.

 

And that’s it. Eventually God will bring everything

that we do out into the open and judge it according

to its hidden intent, whether it’s good or evil.

 Solomon -- a painting from the internet

                         Painting of Solomon

 

Ecclesiastes 11:1 to 12:14 ( The Message) by King

Solomon (aka “The Quester”).  He was a son of King David

of Israel and was appointed King himself at the age of 12.

He only lived 52 years, from 848 B.C. to 796 B.C.). His

major accomplishment was in completing the Jewish

Temple in Jerusalem. Well, that and finding out how to

keep his 300 wives and 700 concubines happy.

 

— See ya the next time. I’m trying to get back into the groove of posting every Thursday. Well, that’s my goal, anyway. — Stan

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Issue 355 – What Does July 4th Mean?

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paregienjournal.com     –     Issue 355     –     June 29, 2017

Well, home owners in Manatee County are doing quite well, thank you. In May of 2017, the median sales price for an existing single-family home stood at $299,000. Folks, that was a 53 percent increase from the end of 2012. Of course, don’t forget there was a big-time real estate “bust” here from 2008 until early 2012. 

****

There was a fine little story in our local paper this morning. Reporter James A. Jones, Jr., did a little feature on a former Manatee County school educator named Bill O’Brien. Bill spends a lot of his time bowling these days, just as he has for the last 76 years. Hey, if I’m lyin’ I’m dyin’. Okay, technically like everyone else, I’m dying bit by bit. But I’m not lyin’. 

You see, Bill O’Brien is now 93 years old. He was first the principal of Prine Elementary, then of Pine View Elementary and then of Parrish Elementary School. A pretty darned good athlete himself in college, after World War II (he was wounded), 31 years ago he started presenting to Manatee County’s top cross country runners each year the “Bill O’Brien Trophy” and he is still doing it. Plus, he set up three endowed scholarship funds to help a few students each year. Bill is a pretty solid citizen, and I’d like to meet him one of these days.

****

Across the Manatee River in Palmetto, several remaining members of the Lincoln Memorial High School – Class of 1967 – met for their 50th reunion. What is really unusual about these people is they were about the last class to graduate from LMHS — an all-black school. There were 131 seniors in their class, but 42 have died. 

****

It has been quite a spell, but at 9:30 a.m. on  Thursday, June 22nd, I met friends Romolo (aka “Rom,” “Ron,” and “Youse guy”) Colella and Don (“The Poetry Machine”) Betts for a late breakfast at Leon’s House of Omelets in the shopping center just west of I-75 and on the south side of Highway 70 (53rd Avenue). We had some coffee and came up with solutions for most of the problems in the United States. Then after breakfast, we developed plans for solving Europe’s difficulties. Next time we’ll work on the energy crisis, I guess. Just routine stuff for old geezers. So if any of you want to join us, give me a call to make sure we’ll be there next time and not at our respective doctor appointments. Ah, yes, the “Golden Years of Life.” Between the three of us, we might have an ounce of gold and everybody is after it. Even if they have to pull it from our teeth.

****

Many may not be aware of the fact that the home headquarters and training center for Goodwill Industries is only a mile or so east of our hacienda. Those folks certainly do a lot of good for many disabled people, with training and jobs and such. Still, because the CEO at Goodwill makes a lot more money than the CEOs of any other similar charities, we prefer to make donations to the Salvation Army. And there are a couple of other Goodwill policies which bug me. They are skilled marketers, of course, taking donated items and marking them up as far as the market will allow. And around here they have donation centers about as common as McDonald’s.

In Manatee County and next-door Sarasota County they have established four stand-alone stores specializing in music and books, and these are very well-organized. But, simultaneously, they have junked the book departments in their regular stores. Once they, too, had books well-organized by topics. No more. In our regular stores, they are heaped together and making it a headache to wade through the mess. Oh, and one other thing I’ve noticed (which other thrift stores have started doing) is that on men’s shirts, for example, they still place price tags and sizes on the individual shirts . . . but then they throw them on the shirt racks with no size organization at all. I don’t get it, don’t like it and won’t shop at the regular stores for clothes or books. Very poor customer service, but easier for them, I guess. 

****

Our daughter, Mrs. John (Stacy) Magness, flew in from Houston on June 13th and left on June 20th. So we got to spend a lot of quality time with her. Of course, we had to work around those pesky afternoon thunderstorms and downpours virtually every day she was here. Still got to take her to both Manatee Beach (our preferred swimmin’ hole, with life guards and a cafe with mmmm, mmmm good pancakes each morning) and to Siesta Beach. Oh, and on her first afternoon, we took her to Clearwater Beach up in nearby Clearwater, Florida. So she got to see Florida’s most award-winning beaches. 

2017--06--13 03 - Clearwater, FL - Peggy and Stacy at CLEARWATER BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 03 - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH -Stacy P Magness by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 08B - Bradenton, FL - MANATEE BEACH - by Stan Paregien2017--06--14 10A - Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--14 10B - Bradenton, FL - Stan Paregien - by Stacy Magness

2017--06--14 11 - Bradenton, FL - Stacy P Magness - by Stan Paregien

2017--06--15 12 - Sarasota, FL - luncheon cruises - by Stan Paregien

We took a very nice luncheon cruise around Sarasota Bay one day. We got to see a couple of dolphin, plus many of the multi-million dollar mansions fronting the bay. 

2017--06--17 02 - Sarasota, FL - - Stacy P Magness

2017--06--17 04 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - panorama by S Magness

2017--06--17 07 - Sarasota, FL - - Ringling - Stacy Magness - by Peg Paregien

Peggy took Stacy down to the fabulous Ringling Mansion, Circus Museum and Art Museum in nearby Sarasota on June 17th. They spent the entire day there and had a great time. 

****

Surely this is not a sign of my memory failing or my advancing years, but . . . in the “Birthdays On This Date” section of our local rag for June 23rd I saw where Clarence Thomas– you know — a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Yep, I recognized him . . . but the long list of “younger” musicians, writers, singers, and actors meant nothing to me. Hmmm.

Rogers, Will and Wiley Post -- one of last photos before deaths on Aug 15, 1935

Will Rogers (top, left) & pilot Wiley Post

And in the longer “Today in History” column I only paid much attention to this note: “In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.” Now Wiley Post, who had a wild hair or two as a teenager in Oklahoma, lost an eye when injured on an oil drilling rig in Oklahoma. So he used the insurance settlement to pay for flying lessons and with the rest he bought his very first airplane.

I read a fine biography of Post a few years back,and the author pointed out all of his successes in flying and in inventing high-altitude equipment for pilots. Because of his many ’round-the-world flights and publicity, it is true that when he and his close friend–movie and stage star Will Rogers–died in Alaska in a plane crash (flown by Post) on August 15, 1935, it was Wiley Post who was far better known outside of the United States. I have been to Rogers’ beautiful grave site and museum in Claremore, Oklahoma as well as to Post’s well-marked burial place in far north central Oklahoma City. Each man was exceptional in his own field of expertise.

****

“Paregien’s Bed & Breakfast & More” will be back in operation soon. We are expecting two of our Rwandan friends to visit us in early to mid-August. Then our son and his wife (Stan Jr. & Becky) and their son and his wife (Daniel and Leah) will be with us, from the St. Louis area, from about August 24th to Sept. 4th. We’re polishing up the horseshoe equipment and the shuffleboard stuff to keep them from getting bored here in Paradise.

****

Peggy and I watched another old movie the other night (the only kind our grandkids swear we watch, but there are a few things they don’t know). Anyway this U.S. Cavalry vs. Indians movie was titled “The Oregon Passage.” It was actually filmed in a forest over not far from Bend, Oregon. It was in color and starred a good-lookin’ dude named John Erickson, whom I had never seen before so I guess he went back to being a lifeguard or selling used cars. I noticed as they rolled the credits that the film script was actually based on a Western novel by someone we knew: Gordon D. Shirreffs.

I first met Gordon D. Shirreffs in about 1984, as I recall, at the annual convention of the members of the Western Writers of America. It was held that summer in Branson, Missouri and hosted by Jory Sherman and his wife, Charlotte. The first person I met as I entered the hotel lobby was one of my writing heroes, from the really old crowd, Thomas (“Tommy”) Thompson. He and I really hit it off, especially after we found out we had each known Harry Leichler (?), the grocer and honorary mayor of the little town of Piru, Calif., where I lived with my family my last three years of high school.

Anyway, over the next few years, we would get to visit with Gordon Shirreffs and his wife Alice, who were residents of Granada Hills, Calif. at the time. At least one day of each convention was taken up with a bus trip excursion somewhere not far away. Those were always great times to visit with big-league writing pros Like Tommy, Gordon and Jory, as well as other would-be-Louis-L’Amour like myself.  

Well, the host of Turner Classic Movies that night wrapped up the showing of the rather forgettable film with a funny story about Gordon Shirreffs. In 1957 he had written a Western novel titled “Rio Bravo.” John Wayne didn’t care much for the actual book, but he loved the title and wanted it for his next movie. So he and/or his Batjack production company paid Gordon some darned good money for the book, with the agreement that Gordon could sell the actual story to anybody else but not the title. So John Wayne got the title he wanted and Gordon got the money he wanted, . . . not once but twice, as the second buyer turned it into “The Oregon Passage.” And he would laugh as he told that true story and add, “That was by far the most money I ever earned for just selling two words (“Rio Bravo”). 

Gordon Shirreffs had been born in Chicago, Ill., on Jan. 15, 1914. His mother was a recent immigrant from Scotland, and he himself sometimes played in bagpipe bands in southern California. During his lifetime he wrote some 79 novels, much in the solid historical style of Louis L’Amour, and hundreds of short stores and a bunch of stories for comic book companies. He was still living in Granada Hills when he died on Feb. 9, 1996 at the age of 82.

2016--03--17 Food -- Florida -- The Recipe Box Eatery

Above is the business card for a really nice, fairly small “mom and pop” restaurant just north of the McDonald’s near 53rd Avenue East (Highway 70) and 33rd St. East. Give ’em a try.

We ran out of TV trays for everyone at our house the other night, but luckily we had a spare out in the shed. I think this guy is saying, “Very nice!” or something like that.

Senior Citizen TV Tray

 

A Crumbled Dream

by Gene Shelburne

Amarillo, Texas

Campbell, Alexander -- liknesses -- 04 at age 65

 

Does the name Alexander Campbell mean anything to you? If you grew up in any kind of Church of Christ or Christian Church, you need to know about him. He was the founder of our American denomination.

Let me confess that, although I did grow up in such a church, I knew little about the man until I was invited to join a host of church leaders at his home in Bethany, West Virginia—way back in 1966— to mark the one hundredth anniversary of Mr. Campbell’s death.

 During that memorable week I learned that Alexander Campbell did more than found churches. In the college he built, he educated the sons of U.S. presidents. Few people noticed when Campbell boosted American wool trade by importing new breeds of sheep. Nor were many folks impressed when he was elected to West Virginia’s legislature. But his star was slowly rising.

Even founding hundreds of congregations across our young, growing country didn’t catapult Campbell to fame. He became a household name after debating—while befriending—the famous atheist Robert Owen. At his prime, this school-founding, sheep-raising, church-planting country parson was invited to address the combined houses of the U.S. Congress. In many ways he had become the Billy Graham of his day.

During that 1966 gathering in Bethany, however, we also focused on the Civil War years right before Campbell’s death. The halls of Bethany College were quiet—almost deserted—while that brutal war was raging not far away. Most of the students were on the battle lines. Campbell’s heart was broken. His own family was split, with favorite nephews wearing uniforms both blue and gray. Still worse, from his view, Christian brothers from churches he had planted and nurtured now were slaughtering each other.

Civil War -- up-close fighting between Union and Rebel troops -- 02

The young nation that Campbell had mistaken for the eve of Christ’s thousand-year reign had morphed into a hell on earth. Campbell’s dream had become a nightmare.

As Will Durant would later write: “From barbarism to civilization requires a century; from civilization to barbarism needs but a day.” Campbell saw barbarism in his final days, and it made him mourn.

With July 4th just ahead, I rehearse this sad but true story to remind us that the peace and freedom and prosperity we cherish can dissolve over night into blood and hate and tears. It did once. It can again.

Logo for Gene Shelburne - 2017

July4th--05 Flag with 4th of July

Do your children and/or grandchildren understand this day?

Best wishes until next time,

Stan

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Issue 354: Manatee County, Florida

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 354     –     June 9, 2017

Manatee County, Florida:

Facts, Fun and Photos

Sometimes when Peggy and I have been on vacation or an extending trip, I will jokingly say to our neighbors when we return: “Where the heck have you been?” Usually, they are kinda taken back by the question and mentally calculate they haven’t been anywhere and then reply, “Me? Where the heck have you been?”

Fair question, since I have not posted here since . . . gulp, . . . March 17th. 

Actually, we have done a fair amount of traveling. That includes a 9-day trip to beautiful Costa Rica. And I have had a health issue or two that just flat made me feeling like doing nuttin’. So I did. And then there were countless hours that I spent wrapping up my most recent book. I really became a hermit in my man cave here at our house in order to get it done before our trip to Costa Rica. More about that project next time. All in all, the last three months have just been busy, busy, busy. And, darn, I’m supposed to be retired. I have resolved to take my foot off of the gas pedal and slow down some.

Okay, let me share with you the good news about my new eBook:

Manatee County, Florida:

Facts, Folks and Photos

 

Master Cover -- Manatee County, FL -- Stan Paregien 01 1,900 X 2,561 X 600 dpi

Hey, is that an attractive book cover or what? I really like it a bunch. Of course, I designed the basic layout, the print, etc., and the photo you see is one  I took at sunset at our nearby Coquina Beach west of Bradenton. Pardon my “fatherly” pride at my newest “baby” but ain’t she just plum purty?

As Elvis always said at the end of a song, “Thank you. Thank you very much.”

Here is the official synopsis of this eBook:

“It is an intriguing combination of one part travel guide for the beaches and other attractions in Manatee County, one part who’s who of today’s leaders and yesterday’s heroes and heroines, one part family photo album, and one part a history book containing over 450 photos and 470 biographical sketches. It is written in a conversational style with touches of wit, wisdom, mystery and spice.  

“Chapter 1, “Manatee County Facts,”  is a quick chronological look at the main events which have happened in Manatee County since ol’ Juan Ponce de Leon set foot here in Paradise in 1513. There’ve been a heck of a lot of other footprints left in the sands of Manatee County since then, and this book notes many of them.

Chapter 2, “Manatee County Cities & Communities,” presents facts and information about Manatee County’s larger cities and the smaller communities as well. All of ’em are fine places, so Stan gives you the inside scoop behind the usual road signs and flashing neon lights. Real people live here and most all of them love it, except maybe for a few diehard sourpusses. You’ll find helpful lists of things you may need to find.

“Chapter 3, “Manatee County Folks,” is where you’ll want to spent a bunch of your time. There you’ll see photos and biographical sketches of hundreds of Manatee County people. Learn why the heck we do things like we do them (Hint: “Because that’s how grandma and grandpa used to do it.”) You’ll meet some of our wonderful pioneer families, a great many solid citizens, plus a lot of folks who work doggoned hard to make this County an even better place to live or to visit.

Chapter 4, “Manatee County Photo Gallery,” is a large and varied photo collection which is guaranteed to put a smile on your face, a bounce in your step and reduction of your acid reflux problem. Well, heck, two out of three hits is darned good in baseball. You’ll get a kick out of the these photos — new ones, old ones, funny ones, sad ones and all in between. 

“Chapter 5, “About the Author,”  contains Stan Paregien’s bio, plus a list of his more than a dozen other eBooks available online through your favorite retailer. 

“The last part, Chapter 6, is titled “Resources.” It contains an extended list of books and articles you can read, videos you can watch and websites you can visit to learn even more about Manatee County.”

Manatee County, Florida: Facts, Folks & Photos is available for downloading to your iPhone, iPad, your Mac or PC laptops or desktop computers and more. This large, photo-filled eBook retails for $9.99.

This book of mine really started back in 2011 or so when my wife Peggy and I were considering moving away from the all-too frequent tornados, ice storms and constant winds in our native state of Oklahoma. We began investigating retirement communities from Arizona to Florida. Most Oklahoma retirees in our income bracket elect to move to south Texas, southern Arizona or to New Mexico. But there were other options as well.
We bought travel books, studied scores of web sites and talked with friends and neighbors. We asked for and received countless colorful brochures from specific states and cities, along with buckets of brochures from realtors and Chamber of Commerce representatives. The more information we received, the more we leaned toward somewhere near the beaches of sunny Florida. So we began a large number of visits to this land of palm trees, beautiful beaches and tropical vegetation populated with many hundreds of 55+ retirement communities for active folks like us.
We would fly into Tampa, rent a car and stay in our niece’s unoccupied seasonal home just to the west in Largo. We used that as our base while we spent a week or so each time researching the pluses and minuses of various towns and retirement villages within them. We concentrated on the west coast of Florida, from Clearwater down to Venice. It was a challenge, to say the least, to find the kind of housing we really liked and to winnow that number down to a much smaller number we could realistically afford. After all that, we still had a staggering variety of choices.
Early in 2013, we made our choice. We found a comfortable, fully furnished manufactured home in a 55+ community of some 267 residences. There was a nice clubhouse and kitchen, a library, a work-out room, an inviting swimming pool and hot tub, the ever-popular shuffle board courts, horseshoe pits and more. Several friendly, welcoming residents eagerly told us about what life was really like there. So in June of 2013, we moved to Bradenton—the County Seat of historic and beautiful Manatee County. Our new adventure had begun.

Today — four years later — the adventure continues each day. Sometimes we get so busy in the golden years of our retirement that we have to hit the reset button, chill out and just bask in the sunshine and inhale the aromas of the year-around flowers and revisit the tropic-like Gulf waters and pristine white beaches.

I planned this book with these ideas in mind: (1) It should be written in a lively, easy-to-read style; (2) It should be an invaluable reference tool for full-time residents of Manatee County; (3) It should be an interesting and useful book for people visiting Florida—and particularly, Manatee County—for the first time; and (4) it should honestly point out the good, the bad and the ugly of Manatee County.

Mission accomplished.

Well, okay, that’s the firm opinion of one not-so-unbiased person. Me.
Critics are likely to say of this book either, “You sure put way too much stuff in there” or “You sure left out a lot of stuff that should have been in there.” My response to both criticisms is this: Yep, that’s right. I put in a lot and I left out a lot. The book is much larger than I intended at the start. And I never even dreamed I would end up with 450 photos and 470 biographical sketches. That’s a bunch, but I have double that material left untouched in the wings. So . . .

Personally, I have never read anything that even comes close to my book in terms of readability, comprehensiveness or usefulness. I’m pleased with it and eager to share it with others. And I hope you will be so doggoned pleased with your copy that you will buy others as Christmas or birthday gifts, or for friends or relatives who are thinking about moving or visiting here.

Hey, you may even want to send one to such a person “up north” when we’re sunbathing in 80 degree weather and up there they have snow a foot deep and the temperature is dipping toward zero. That should get their attention.

Also, just this week five more  of my eBooks were added to Amazon.com’s lineup of eBooks. Those five books are my two Western novels, a book of my general poetry, and two fun story books each containing 15 of my cowboy stories which I performed for years “from hither to yon” from California to Arkansas and from Texas to Montana. Those 20 some years were quite an interesting ride. 

 

Okay, ’nuff about that.

Hopefully, I’ll get back on a more regular pace of posting my little photo/essays here.

Next time I plan to tell you a little about our trip to beautiful Costa Rica that starting on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 and ended on Thursday, May 18, 2017. We had a delightful, though often rain-swept, time visting with our Oklahoma friends Larry and Linda Seng. More next time.

Oh, one more thing. I always get a kick out of watching my stats for these posting. No, I don’t have millions of folks flocking to this site. But what truly amazes me are the hits that I get from so many countries in the world. Here are some samples from just the last 8 days:  U.S.A. . . . Canada . . . Malaysia . . . European Union . . . Poland . . . Puerto Rico . . . Philippines . . . India . . . United Kingdom . . . Zimbabwe . . . Indonesia . . . Australia . . . Mexico . . . Japan . . . Argentina . . . Turkey . . . and Germany. That’s pretty amazing to me, and I’m glad to have each person, from here or abroad, stop by for a visit.

Best wishes to one and all,

— Stan Paregien

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Issue 353    –     March 17, 2017

Horsin’ Around in Florida

Retired folks in Florida just don’t have many empty days on their calendars. First of all, there are all those coffee hours, bingo games and shuffleboard games that beckon every week. Then there are all those Yankees who come down from up North to visit “during the season.” And then, if that were not enough to keep one busy, there is a lot of just plain ol’ horsin’ around on my agenda. 

For example, we dearly love all of the beautiful beaches here on the Gulf side of Florida. Some of the best anywhere are from Clearwater to our north and down to Venice on our south. But undoubtedly, the first choice for a broad, pearly white beach and beautiful water the prize goes to Siesta Beach on the west edge of Sarasota. That’s about 20 miles from our house. So . . . hi-ho, hi-ho . . . it’s off to the beach we go. 

2017--02--23 07 Siesta Beach - No 1 in US, No 5 in World

Ralph Iacovacci (“The Italian Stallion,” so named because he liked to put in a quarter and ride those horses outside Walmart) and his wife Eunice told us about a “Night of Nashville Music” program put on by their church. So Peggy and I saddled up and joined the fun.

2017--02--25 01 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 02 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 03 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

Now about that “Best Western Outfit” contest mentioned below in the program, . . . well, shazam . . . I won the doggoned thing. Got a new Dodge Ram pickup truck, too. Hey, I can dream can’t I? The real prize was dinner for two at a local restaurant. That was close enough to satisfy me.

2017--02--25 04 Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 05A Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 05B Bradenton, FL - Nashville Music Show

2017--02--25 07 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

“Hey, babe, ya wanna fool around . . . er, I mean pucker up??”

2017--02--25 06 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

2017--02--25 08 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien

2017--02--25 09 Bradenton, FL - Stan Paregien's boots and spurs

And next . . . . 

2017--03--02 01 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 03 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 04 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 05 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 06 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 07 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 08 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 09 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 10 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 11 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 13 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--02 14 Myakka, FL - Herrman's Lipizzan Stallions - by Stan Paregien

And then an afternoon spent in Sarasota looking at old (i.e., classic) cars. And we returned that evening for a very good singer (Jimmy Mezz) doing “A Tribute to Music of the 1950’s.” 

2017--03--03 06 Sarasota, FL - P Paregien, G and James Cotton - Classic Cars - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--03 05 Sarasota, FL - James Cotton at Classic Cars - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--05 01A Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

2017--03--05 01C Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

2017--03--05 03 Palmetto, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien - by G Cotton

2017--03--07 01 Bradenton, FL - James and Glenda Cotton

2017--03--07 02 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien and Allie - by Stan Paregien

And next, . . . we and our neighbors/friends Michael and Penny Letichevsky went over to Aracadia, Florida (about 1 hour southeast of us) on March 11th to enjoy the 89th Annual Arcadia Rodeo. We all enjoyed the cowboy and cowgirl action. They’re even supposed to have a brand-new arena ready for next year’s event.

2017--03--11 01 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien
2017--03--11 02 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 03 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 04 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 05 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 06 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 07 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

That clown is being just a little too nosey, if you catch my drift. 

2017--03--11 08 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 09 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 10 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 11 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 12 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 12B Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 13 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 14 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 15 Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16A Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16B Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16C Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 16D Arcadia, FL - barrel racing - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17A Arcadia, FL - rodeo - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17B Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17C Arcadia, FL - Penny Letichevsky - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17D Arcadia, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 17D1 Arcadia, FL - Stan Paregien

And here’s the old cowboy himself.

2017--03--11 17E Arcadia, FL - Peggy Paregien - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 19 Arcadia, FL - Clydesdale - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 20 Arcadia, FL - Penny Letichevsky with Clydesdale - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 21 Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky with portapotties - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 22 Arcadia, FL - Michael Letichevsky with portapotties - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 23 Arcadia, FL - bull - by Stan Paregien

2017--03--11 24 Arcadia, FL - bull - by Stan Paregien

Well, as you can clearly see, we have been doing a lot of horsin’ around here in Florida. So you might just as well come on down and join the fun.

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Issue 352 – A Visit to Dade City, Florida

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Issue 352    –    March 17, 2017

A Visit to Dade City, Florida:

February 15-16, 2017

2017--02--15 30A Dade City, FL -logo - by S Paregien

2017--02--15 30B Dade City, FL - info - by S Paregien

2017--02--15 30C Dade City, FL - info - by S Paregien

2017--02--15 30D Dade City, FL - info - by S Paregien

2017--02--15 30E Pasco County, FL - logo - by S Paregien

2017--02--15 33A ice creme cone - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

During our recent stay in Ocala, Florida . . . we stayed at the infamous “Bates Motel.” Alfred Hitchcock himself left the light on for us. Well, not literally, of course. But it turned out to be a whole lot less safe and much more shabby than we would have predicted from the office, lobby and outside. We put a chair against the inside of our door and another up against the sliding glass door to the outside. And I had my trusty 9 mm pistola on the end table where I could reach it. Yeah, it really was that creepy. 

So when we breezed into Dade City we decided to spent a little more (okay, a lot more) for a room at the Hampton Inn. It was very nice. Free cookies. Free USA today. Nice breakfast. In other words, most of the comforts of home. It is on the south side of town. Very peaceful night of rest.

2017--02--16 01 hog sale - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 02 our 2016 Kia - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 03 history marker - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 04 history marker - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 05 history marker - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

We saw a sign or an ad pointing out that Dade City has about 13 antique stores in town. So we did our doggonedest to visit each and every one of ’em. Didn’t quite get ‘er done, so we may have to mosey over there again some time.

2017--02--16 06 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 07 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 08 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 09 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 10 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 11 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by Peg Paregien

2017--02--16 11 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 12 Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 13A Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 13B Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 14A Mary Leeznar - Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 14B Mary Leeznar - Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

If you go there, tell Mary that Stan and Peggy sent ya. Heck, no, she won’t remember us from Adam and Eve, of course. But she will make you feel right at home. Yep, ya durned tootin’.

2017--02--16 15 history marker - Pasco County Courthouse - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

Dade City seemed like a real pleasant country town, only with lots of traffic on the main highways. There are quite a number of historic homes and retail businesses there. We could easily have spent another night there, but we needed to get home to milk our herd of cows (any excuse will do when you’re ready to get back into your bed). 

2017--02--16 16 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 17 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien2017--02--16 18 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 19 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 20 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 21 downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

I just couldn’t get up enough nerve to order a fair-to-middlin’ sized slice of Kumquat pie. It just sounds odd, maybe even unAmerican. But apparently folks around Dade City are proud of it.

2017--02--16 22 P Paregien - downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

Here is my Sweet Thang, looking her always good lookin’ self. I took these photos just because I was struck by the texture of the nearby walls. I guess that is the goofy . . . er, I mean, artistist . . . photographer in my DNA. And I wondered which might make a more interesting background for a photo. I guess I’m still wondering, but I kinda lean toward the one above. What do you think?

2017--02--16 23A P Paregien - downtown - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 23B Stan Paregien - downtown - Dade City, FL - by P Paregien

2017--02--16 24 west side - Dade City, FL - by S Paregien

Surprisingly, it is just a hop, skip and a jump from Dade City to San Antonio, Texas. You know, the town that ol’ Bob Wills sang about.

Well, . . . okay, you got me.

No, Brother Bob never fiddled a lick about t-h-i-s San Antonio. Because this quiet, tiny town is San Antonio, Florida. I didn’t realize there was such a place until earlier on this trip when we were looking at the map for alternate routes (i.e., back roads and cow trails) to get home from Dade City. This was a nice diversion. 

 

2017--02--16 30 - San Antonio, FL - by S Paregien

2017--02--16 31 - San Antonio, FL - by S Paregien

They have a Mexican restuarant just off the beautiful town square and park, and the name has something to do with Pancho Villa. I don’t think ol’ Pancho ever ate tacos there, though.There was quite a line at the door. So, since I don’t like long lines, we drove on down to Zephrhills and ate lunch at “Rick’s” on the west side of town. Very nice “mom and pop” kind of place that closes at 2 pm, then I think reopens in the evening.

We just drove through Zephrhills (oh, sure, we did stop at a couple of thrift stores on the west side of town) on the fly, but we passed one Mobile Home Park right after the other. Heck, I’ve got nothing against MHP’s per se (since we live in one), but these seemed kinda packed tight and a bit older. And lots of ’em. To each his own, I reckon.

Well, neighbors, that’s about all I can tell you about Dade City and San Antonio. I think you’d enjoy an overnight visit to the area, though. 

Adios for now.

— Stan

 

 

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