Category Archives: American culture

Issue 371 – Christmas Truces in 1914

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 371     –     December 8, 2017

A true story worth sharing . . . 

Christmas Truces in 1914:

Peace in the Trenches of World War I

 by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Dec. 8, 2017

War and Peace - The Christmas Truce on Dec 25, 1914 During World War I - painting in the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS - Jan, 1915

World War I began as a dispute between Austria-Hungary and Serbia on July 28, 1914, but soon involved many countries of the world. It pitted the “Allied Forces” such as Serbia, Belgium, France, Great Britain and Ireland, Italy, Japan and Russia against the so-called “Central Powers” such as Serbia, Germany, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire. The United States did not officially join the Allied forces until 1917.  Many journalists and politicians billed this military struggle as “the war to end all wars.” By the end of World War I on November 11, 1918 , some 25 million people – soldiers and civilians – had been killed or serious injured. And when the smoke cleared, no one saw it as an antidote to future wars.

By November of 1914, all allusions about this war being a short one were gone. Along the Western Front, each side was dug-in to fortified, well-defended trenches and underground tunnels. This had become a war of attrition, depression and sometimes boredom.

1915--War--World War 2 -- digging trenches

War--WW 1 -- British solders on the Western Front opposite Germans - slighly damp trench -- 01

War--WW 1 -- Map of the Western Front in 1914

However, a striking example of human decency and goodwill took place mainly on the Western Front between some of the British troops and some of the opposing German troops just five months after the war had started in Europe. One hour these young soldiers were trying to kill their enemies in their trenches often less than a hundred yards away. Each army was hunkered down in their respective muddy trenches, cold and lonely and experiencing a mixture of fear and courage.

1915--War--World War 2 -- military-- medical -- shellshock

It was shortly just before midnight on Christmas Eve that a series of purely spontaneous and often unauthorized truces broke out along the long battle line. Most believe it was the German boys who started it when they stopped firing their rifles and machine guns and artillery. As that awkward peace lingered, those German troops began singing Christmas songs. In a few places, some even accompanied the singing with harmonicas or bugles.

Naturally, the leaders of the British troops were at first skeptical of this “truce” and viewed it as a trick to lull them into a false sense of security. But it wasn’t that at all. Soon, here and there along the Western Front, British troops began singing out their own Christmas carols with both pleasure and gusto. Their own musicians kicked in with whatever instruments they had at their disposal. And the Germans began yelling out in their own language or even in broken English, “Merry Christmas.” And the British troops in those spots along the war zone responded with their own shouts of “Merry Christmas to all.”

1914 -- World War 1 - German soldiers with an Xmas tree and singing carols

That kind of activity lasted through the early morning hours of Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 1914. Then just after dawn, amazingly, a handful of young German troops stood up with their arms outstretched to show they were not armed. After a few minutes they slowly walked toward the opposing troops and across “no-man’s land.” Just as bravely, a few of the British troops crawled out of their trenches and walked toward the Germans with their own arms outstretched in a sign of friendship. The two groups met in the middle ground, shook hands and even embraced in generous expressions of friendship. In a few minutes, many others from both sides joined the group standing exposed in the middle of the battlefield. They sang Christmas songs with the same melodies, but their different languages. And they laughed. A lot. A few even brought out leather-bound soccer balls and the two sides played “kick ball” or “kick about.”

1914 -- World War 1 - British and German soldiers sharing a Christmas tree

It was during these brief but enthusiastic kick ball competitions that the Germans got both an education and a chuckle or two. In one location there was a regiment of British troops from Scotland and they wore their traditional kilts on the battlefield. A German lieutenant, Johannes Niemann, years later recalled the scene this way:

1914--War--World War1 -- Scottish & German solders playing kick ball on Xmas Day

“Us Germans really roared when a gust of wind revealed that the Scots wore no drawers under their kilts—and hooted and whistled every time they caught an impudent glimpse of one posterior belonging to one of ‘yesterday’s enemies.’ But after an hour’s play, when our Commanding Officer heard about it, he sent an order that we must put a stop to it. A little later we drifted back to our trenches and the fraternization ended.”

Scottish soldiers in kilts in 1915 during WW 1

This entirely impromptu show of the brotherhood of man soon had them exchanging small gifts – perhaps a coin from their own respective currency, chocolate bars, military dress buttons, a pack of cigarettes, a can of peaches or plum pudding, a spare patch of their military unit or whatever they had at hand. In a few instances, prisoners were even exchanged and each side given time to bury their dead. This scene was repeated in many places along the Western war front as spontaneous gestures of goodwill, if only for a day.

Peace in the trenches, what a marvelous Christmas gift.

Of course, not all units of either Army participated in the truces. Some never even heard of them, since they were spontaneous and unauthorized beyond low-level officers right there in the field. Others among  both the German and the British sides actually opposed such unauthorized fraternization with the enemy. When reports of these truces and fraternization reached the higher commanders, stern rebukes were issued and penalties imposed for such unauthorized actions. One of those who stood opposed to such truces was the French military leader Charles de Gaulle, and another was a young German officer named . . . Adolph Hitler of the 16th Bavarian Reserve Infantry. 

Meanwhile, away from the actual battlefields there were pockets of anti-war protestors who saluted the spontaneous truces but protested for far more. When the United States began drafting young men into the military in 1917, it was labor leader Eugene V. Debs who opposed it and was sent to a Federal prison until 1920. Bertrand Russell, one of Britain’s leading intellectuals, spoke out against the war and spent six-months in a London jail for his efforts. Likewise, Rosa Luxemburg was an anti-war German leader who was imprisoned for two years for her protests.

Also, unfortunately, even on that Christmas day in 1914 killing and dying took place not far from some of those truce celebrations. Here are two examples.

In the darkness just before dawn, near the French village of Festubert—just a half-mile from some of the truce celebrations, several German soldiers hoisted lamps up above their trenches. “Those lamps looked like Chinese lanterns” some said. Then they called out to their British counterparts across the no man’s land. The men shouted out an offer for a day of mutual piece on this Christmas day. A British officer, thinking it was a ruse, ordered his men to shoot out those glowing lamps and they did. The German troops got the message, dismissed their generous overture to the British, and had their own short period of singing Christmas carols.

 

Huggins, Percy - British soldier killed on Dec 25, 1914 -- 02

Photo of  Private Percy Huggins

(1) So it was that later that day  a  23-year old private from England named Percy Huggins (1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment ) was at his assigned post.  It was business as usual on his part of the Western Front. He was stationed on the line less than a hundred  yards from a German  trench   Private Huggins peeked over the mound of dirt in front of his own trench and that is when a German sniper fired a fatal bullet through his head.

(2) The men of Huggins’ regiment were enraged by his killing on this Christmas day. Immediately, his platoon Sergeant, Tom Gregory, demanded and received permission to take his comrade’s position to give him a chance at avenging his friend’s death. Sgt. Gregory, was 36-years old and an expert marksman himself. Back home in Watford, England he had worked for the postal service. On this frigid day he lay still on the frost covered dirt and soon saw the German sniper and killed him with one shot. Instantly, he detected the movement of another sniper but before he could aim his own rifle the second sniper shot and killed him.

These two British soldiers were among  their 149 fellow soldiers who lost their lives on that Christmas day in 1914 (some who died that day had had  previously-inflicted battle wounds). And, of course, a number of German troops – like the one sniper mentioned above — were killed on that day as well.

By 1915, both sides had perfected new technologies of killing their enemies such a machine guns and tanks. One of the most frightening weapons, but not terribly efficient, was the release of poison gas, a tactic used by both the Allied Forces and the Cenral  Powers. By 1917, both sides were experiencing  sharp increases in deaths and carnage. So, not surprisingly, all sides demonized their opponents. And no more opportunities occurred for such spontaneous truces as those in 1914.

Still, those amazing displays of brotherhood and humanity between opposing troops on Christmas day in 1914 are still poignant reminders of what can happen between people of goodwill. That unique day has inspired poems like that of Carol Ann Duffy (Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom) in 2013 titled “The Christmas Truce” and songs like “Christmas in the Trenches” by John McCutcheon in 1984, as well as scores of articles like this one you’re reading and dozens of books like scholar Adam Hochschild’s volume titled To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918.

So let’s all stop for a moment, making our own truce in the middle of our busy lives. Is there a person or a group of people with whom you have had difficulties that you might take a first step of peace . . . and perhaps of reconciliation? 

The apostle Paul certainly was echoing the ministry of Jesus when he wrote in Romans 12:18, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”

Maybe you could break the ice between you and an estranged relative . . . or between you and a group of people . . . or between your congregation (or club or organization) and another by handing key people a copy of this article. And say something to the effect that you’d like to stop shooting at each other and have a truce, with a view toward lasting peace.

My hope is the examples of these warring troops who reached out to each other on Christmas day in 1914 will motivate us to establish our own spontaneous truces where the influence of the Prince of Peace is desperately needed.

Sources:

Bajekal, Naina. “Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914.” Published online by Time magazine at: http://time.com/3643889/christmas-truce-1914/. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017.

Brown, Malcolm and Shirley Seaton. The Christmas Truce: The Western Front December 1914. London: Papermac, 1994.

“Christmas is for Sharing.” This was a Christmas-time ad (video) which was produced in 2014 as a TV commercial by the Sainsbury’s chain of grocery stores in the eastern United State. You may view it on YouTube at:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KHoVBK2EVE

“Christmas Truce.” Wikipedia, accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_truce)

“Christmas truce of 1914 was broken when German snipers killed two British soldiers.”

Posted to the web site of the London Telegraph newspaper on Dec. 22, 2014 near the 100th anniversary of this event. Accessed Dec. 2, 2017 at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11307513/Christmas-truce-of-1914-was-broken-when-German-snipers-killed-two-British-soldiers.html ]

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park (eds.). The Christmas Truce 1914: Operation Plum Puddings, accessed December 22, 2011.  

Dash, Mike. “The Story of the WWI Christmas Truce.” An article for the Smithsonian Museum Magazine which was published on their web site on Dec. 23, 2011. Accessed on Dec. 2, 2017 at:  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-story-of-the-wwi-christmas-truce-11972213/   

Ferro, Marc and‎ Malcolm Brown and‎ Rémy Cazals and Olaf Mueller. Meetings in No Man’s Land: Christmas 1914 and Fraternization in the Great War. London: Constable & Robinson, 2007.

Cleaver, Alan and Lesley Park.  Not a Shot was Fired: Letters from the Christmas Truce 1914.  Alan Cleaver, Publisher. 2nd Edition in full color, 2008.

“Christmas Truce of 1914,” a video.  History.com   Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 online at: http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/christmas-truce-of-1914

Hochschild, Adam. To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918. New York: Mariner Books by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011.

Kuper, Simon. “Soccer in the trenches: Remembering the WWI Christmas Truce.”  Published on the ESPN sports web site on Dec. 25, 2015. Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017 at: http://www.espn.com/soccer/blog/espn-fc-united/68/post/2191045/christmas-truce-soccer-matches-during-world-war-one.

Rees, Simon. “The Christmas Truce.” Published online on Aug. 22, 2009 at http://firstworldwar.com/features/christmastruce.htm . Accessed on Dec. 7, 2017. “First World War.com” bills itself as “a multimedia history of World War One.”

Snow, Dan.  “What really happened in the Christmas truce of 1914?”  A presentation on the British Broadcasting Company’s TV channel. Accessed Dec. 1, 2017 online at

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zxsfyrd.

“The Christmas Truce.” A song written by John McKutcheon in 1984 about the truces in the trenches of World War I along the Western Front in Europe. See and hear him perform his song on YouTube at: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=chords+for+the+song%2c+%22Christmas+in+the+Trenches%22&&view=detail&mid=2E284897E6744A13B6DE2E284897E6744A13B6DE&&FORM=VDRVRV

Twitter, Jon Wiener. “The Day the Troops Refused to Fight: December 25, 1914.”  Published in the online version of The Nation magazine on Dec. 23, 2014 to mark the 100th anniversary of this remarkable day. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017 at:

https://www.thenation.com/article/day-troops-refused-fight-december-25-1914/ ]

Weintraub, Stanley. “Demystifying the Christmas truce.” The Heritage of the Great War.  __________.  Silent Night: The Remarkable Christmas Truce Of 1914. London: Simon & Schuster, 2001.

“World War I.” Wikipedia. Accessed on Dec. 1, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I.

 

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Some Thoughts on Cats and Dogs,

Candles, and Romans 14

 By Curtis K. Shelburne

Copyrighted Dec. 4, 2017

Getting ready. That’s what Advent is about.

At church we lit the first candle of Advent this morning, and, as I write on this Sunday evening, I’m sitting in a quiet house, enfolded by the warm glow of the light from our Christmas tree.

I didn’t grow up observing Advent or, for that matter, any of the other seasons of the “Christian calendar.” I was unaware that there was such a thing, and in our non- or anti-denomination denomination, there most certainly was not. I was blessed by “our” folks and still love them, but our bunch back then wasn’t even very sure about celebrating Christmas as a “religious” holiday. We weren’t the only ones. Chalk that, and a lot of this, up to our common Puritan ancestors, I think, who tended to be suspicious of both color and celebration.  But, honestly, I need to read more history to be sure I’m being fair with them.

As I grew older, I suppose I became vaguely aware that Lent was a time preceding Easter and, I thought, seemed to have something maybe to do with eating fish on Fridays. What else? I didn’t know.

As is the case with all of us pretty much all of the time, I needed very badly to learn a little more history to be able to make more sense out of the present and plot a wise course for the future. And, as a Christian, I desperately needed to read more church history for the very same reasons.

I also needed to learn some things other members of Christ’s family could teach me if we’d just try to cross over our walls occasionally and visit a bit. Not only do we honor our Lord by doing so (he prayed poignantly for the unity of God’s people, you know, in John 17), we also put ourselves in a position to learn some things. We might or might not choose to make some changes in our own situations, but at least we might come to understand more about the decisions and practices of other folks who love and honor their Lord every bit as much as our own little group does. The guy who said that cats and dogs who try spending more time with each other often find it to be a very broadening experience was on to something.

Differences among Christians regarding the keeping—or not—of special days is nothing new. When the Holy Spirit made it clear that God wanted the doors of his church opened wide to both Jews and Gentiles (the gulf between them was vastly wider than that between, say, a Baptist and a Lutheran) well, you never saw cats and dogs have a harder time figuring out how to live under one roof.

Ironically, then it was the more conservative folks who felt duty-bound to observe special feast days, and folks on the other end of the spectrum who felt perfectly free not to. Read the amazing Romans 14 to see God’s incredible counsel to his kids about dealing with differences. Don’t stand in judgment on each other, he says. Make a decision that you believe honors Christ. In love, let your brothers and sisters do the same. And don’t you kids dare look down on each other or try to make laws for one another! You’ve got one Master. You’re not him.

By the way, it turns out that Lent has precious little to do with fish. Advent does have something to do with candles (and I like candles). But both have a lot to do with preparing our hearts to more fully receive what God is doing. Personally, I like that a lot. Personally, I need that a lot.

[Copyright 2017 by Curtis K. Shelburne of Muleshoe, TX. Permission to copy without altering text or for monetary gain is hereby granted subject to inclusion of this copyright notice. You’re invited to visit his website at http://www.CurtisShelburne.com ]

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Issue 370 – Christmas Cheer

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 370     –     Dec. 4, 2017

Christmas Cheer

Ah, here we are. Another holiday season with both Christmas and New Years Day fast approaching. Amid the din of noisy TV and radio commerials and the ads packing each issue of our newspaper, there is still an opportunity now and then to push the pause button and reflect on what the Christmas season means to me and to our society.

Oh, sure, there are those who see Christmas as just a time for more than a “cup of cheer,” more like a keg of beer and pretzels and tacos. Their anthem is,. “Let’s party! And, oh yeah, Merry Christmas and all that stuff.”

I was reminded recently about how a great many Americans and people in other cultures around the world still pause on Christmas to speak a word of kindness or to actually do a neighborly act for someone as a way of honoring the man Jesus who outgrew that manger in Bethleham and devoted his life to doing good for everyone.

On Saturday, November 17, 2017, we were guests of our son and his wife at whole day walking around Silver Dollar City near Branson, Missouri. People were there for the amusement rides, the Christmas parade, the lights and the vast selection of food items. In addition, though, at about 1:30 pm we joined an overflow crowd (I’d guess about 500 people) who found seats in the beautiful theater there. And then we were all treated to a live play, a really fine production of Charles Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol.” Like many of you grey-haired or no-haired folks, I have seen several versions of that play. 

However, I must say that this production on that day was the best I’ve ever experienced. The actors were simply superb. The orchestra was magnificent. The sets were like candy for the eyes. And the audience, . . . well, they clapped enthusiastically at the right times and wiped their eyes, as did I, at the quiet and emotional moments. I was so glad I got to experience that production and to do so with family and friends. Despite the fridgid north wind and the occasional rain, I was overjoyed to be there. Again I was reminded that people really do enjoy good stories with good moral values — honesty, loyalty to family and friends, sacrificial love of dedicated mothers and fathers for their children, and that still wonderful bond of community between people of diverse backgrounds.

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On Sunday, Dec. 3rd, we were out kicking around with friends Michael & Penny Letichevsky. Since Peggy and I had outfitted in “Christmas colors,” we all stopped by the Desoto Mall in Bradenton for Penny to take a few photos to try to get one we could insert in a few Christmas cards.

This shot was a great one, by our standards, but it came in 2nd place.

2017--12--03 03B Bradenton, FL - Stan & Peggy Paregien by Penny Letichevsky

The “1st Place” photo was totally unexpected. Ol’ Santa himself left his station where he was available for photos with kids . . . and sneaked up behind us and got into one of our photos. We love it, because we were blissfully ignorant he was right behind us and getting in on the fun.

2017--12--03 03A Bradenton, FL - Stan & Peggy Paregien by Penny Letichevsky

Yep, as you can probably tell from the above photo, both Peggy and I have trimmed down considerably over the last four months or so. I feel better now than I have in many years. And prettier, too. Yuk-yuk.

2017--12--03 09 Bradenton, FL - Stan and Peggy Paregien - by Penny Letichevsky

And Now, . . . A Word About

Football

Sooners.

Yes, as in the University of Oklahoma Sooners football team. They sport a record of 12 wins and one loss. And on New Years Day they will play the University of Georgia Bulldogs at the one-and-only Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. Later that night, the Clemson Tigers will play the Univerity of Alabama Tide. Then the winners of those two games will play for the National Championship.

2017--10--12 Logo for the University of Oklahoma Sooners

Congratulations to the OU football players, to their coaches and to their supporters — “the Sooner Nation.” I am of the humble, unbiased opinion that the Sooners will neuter the Dogs in their semi-finals game and will finally reign as the National Champions.

2017--10--13 Logo for the University of Oklahoma Sooners

After all, we have a not-too-secret weapon in our quarterback, Baker Mayfield, likely the next Heisman Trophy winner as the best football player in America, the world and our universe.

2017--10--10 Baker Mayfield, quarterback at Oklahoma University Sooners

Go Sooners!!

 

Betts, Don -- Wagging a Yuletide Dogs Tale -- 2017-12-25 Page 1 of 3

[Don Betts’ poem, Wagging a Yuletide Dogs Tale]

Betts, Don -- Wagging a Yuletide Dogs Tale -- 2017-12-25 Page 2 of 3

 

Betts, Don -- Wagging a Yuletide Dogs Tale -- 2017-12-25 Page 3 of 3

Bravo, Mr. Betts. Another amazingly creative and always linguistically challenging poem. Keep up the fine work, my dear friend.

2012--Christmas--tree--Blondie Cartoon--Dagwood trims the new tree--2012--12--16

[“Blondie” cartoon about an ugly Christmas tree and how Dagwood made it uglier.]

Christmas Trees Don’t Have To Be Perfect

To Be Beautiful

 By Curtis K. Shelburne

My earliest Christmas memories are mostly wrapped around our family’s Christmas trees.

 I remember Mom making creamy hot chocolate and my sister stacking the spindle of the old record player with an inch-high pile of vintage vinyl Christmas music by Nat King Cole, Perry Como, Tennessee Ernie Ford, and the Norman Luboff Choir.

 Most years the tree had already been bought at (where else?) Amarillo’s Boy Scout Troop 80 Christmas tree lot. I was a member of Troop 80 and thus expected to help sell trees each year. My younger brother was not, but he was a wheeler-dealer sort who liked selling trees and often, as I recall, managed to pawn off more trees than most of the bona fide boy scouts. Jacob (I mean, Jim) always felt Jacob of old settled for far too little when he sold his hungry brother Esau that bowl of stew and only got a birthright for it. Jim would’ve held out for hard cash and then the birthright at the end as a balloon payment.

Christmas Tree-- imperfect trees are okay

[photo of a not-too perfect tree]

We’d lean the tree in the garage for a day or a few on its amputation-site stump in a bucket of water while it waited to be lit and glorified. Anchoring the tree in the stand was a chore. Jim and I would crawl under the scratchy boughs and slide around on our wood floor to turn each screw just the right amount. It was never straight the first time.

Then my 15-years-older sister, the unquestioned head honcho of the process, would ascend to perform the task of highest honor as she put on the lights (bubble lights, snowball lights, and all), a job in later years graciously bequeathed to me.

 Then we would hang the ornaments, a tedious task but nothing like as bad as the final stage in the process: hanging the icicles.

I don’t see those long, thin, silvery strands of foil or plastic, those “icicles,” on trees much anymore. I hope never again to have to put them on one of mine.

1940s Christmas tree - with lots of tinsels

[ photo of a 1940s style Christmas tree with lots of icicles]

According to my sister, they had to be hung with great care, one at a time. Ten million or so came in a box. You’d drag one out of the box and carefully place it over a tree branch. It was essential, my sister assured us, to start at the back near the trunk and make sure the icicle hung straight down on both sides of the branch. Straight down. No clumps. Which is why Jim’s preferred method of grabbing a paw-full of icicles and launching the whole wad in the general direction of the tree was sternly forbidden. No. One at a time. Until you froze there, died there, decayed there, and Christmas never came, and it was spring and you were still hanging icicles. One at a time.

 I don’t know what we thought would happen—apart from sure death—if we didn’t hang the icicles exactly right. Would Santa’s sleigh suddenly crash in flight and the FAA later determine and publish for the whole world full of weeping giftless children to see that the cause was icing—not on the sleigh but improper tree icicling by two Shelburne boys at 125 N. Goliad, Amarillo, Texas, whose wanton and reckless disregard had killed Santa?

I’m sure we never did it “right.” But I remember wandering into the living room as a little lad clad in those great PJs that came complete with feet, lying down almost under the tree, looking up through its branches, and drinking in the beauty.

By God’s grace, Christmas trees don’t have to be perfect to be beautiful. Neither do lives.

[Copyright 2011 by Curtis K. Shelburne. Permission to copy without altering text or for monetary gain is hereby granted subject to inclusion of this copyright notice.]

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an-christmas tree

Christmastree-dog

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Poem 139 - The Truth About Santa Claus -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien on Feb 1, 1992

[ Stan Paregien’s poem, “The Truth About Santa” ]

Poem 393 -- A Holiday Greeting -- copyrighted by Stan Paregien on Oct 13, 2014

[Stan Paregien’s poem, “A Holliday Greeting” ]

Poem 402 Christmas Time in Florida - by Stan Paregien Nov 14, 2014

[ Stan Paregien’s poem, “Christmas Time in Florida” ]Poem by S Omar Barker - One Snowy Christmas Eve - in THE ROUNDUP for Dec, 1978, page 7
[ S. Omar Barker’s poem, “One Snowy Christmas Eve” ]S Omar Barker, 'The Cowboy's Christmas Prayer'
[ S. Omar Barker’s poem, “A Cowboy’s Christmas Prayer” ]

2017--12--03 06 Bradenton, FL - Be still and know that I am God - Psalm 46 v10

[ “Be still and know that I am God. Psalm 46:10 ]

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Honor Roll of Visitors

to The Paregien Journal

http://www.paregienjournal.com

I enjoy writing, as all of you can attest. My first published article was in the student newspaper at the first college I attended, back in the fall of 1961. Since then I have had hundreds of articles appear in scores of different newspapers and magazines. And three hardback books, two paperback books and 15 eBooks later, I haven’t lost that drive to find ideas worthy of sharing with all of you.

There is something singularly satisfying about my little blogs published as the title of THE PAREGIEN JOURNAL at http://www.paregienjournal.com. That satisfaction comes from knowing that on any given day there may be people visiting my site from all over the world. Instantly. Amazing.

I am pleased and thankful that – just since January 1, 2017 — people from 72 nations visited this web page. Heck, I don’t even know where many of them are on a map of the world. But here is that list as of Nov. 10, 2017:

Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Estonia, European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong SAR China, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland,Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe.

Thanks to all those who live in other nations and have honored us with a visit to this site. We appreciate it very much. Please feel free to leave a comment.

I’m giving some serious thought to doing a series of profiles next year about each of the nations listed above. I’m start with the first three — Albania, Algeria, Andorra — and see how that goes. If you are from one of those nations  or can put me in touch with a knowledgeable person with first-hand, recent information, I’d appreciate a note to me at:  paregien@gmx.com . Thanks.

an-christmas-fiveCats

A very merry Christmas to each and every one of you. And if you haven’t done so as yet, why not take a small gift or a dish of food to someone who is sick or lonely? You could certainly cheer them up. Then that person would be blessed and so would you, especially if you warmly and graciously offer to pick that person up in your car and spend maybe just an hour driving around looking at all the Christmas lights.

Until next year, Lord willing.

— Stan Paregien

2017--12--03 04 Bradenton, FL - Stan & Peggy Paregien by Penny Letichevsky

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Issue 369 – Trouble in Florida

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The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 369     –     Nov. 10, 2017

Trouble in Florida

Yes, friends, Florida is a wonderful place to live. Its name even conjures up the good life: the Spanish word “florida” means “land of flowers.” And so it is. Plus the land of perpetual sunshine and gentle, warm surf. Ah, yes, the good life. 

Only Hawaii and Florida among the U.S. states have truly tropical climates. That is a tremendous draw for tourists from other states and around the world to visit Florida. Florida is the 3rd most populous state in the Union and is the 8th most densely populated state. As of July 1, 2015, our resident population stood at a whopping 20 million well-suntanned folks and a few sunburned ones. The bean counters say that was nearly an 8% increase just in five years (since the Census of 2010). And newcomers keep pouring in, a fact which keeps the pressure on increasing real estate prices.

Of course, we do have a few wee issues such as (1) we are the lightning capital of the United States; (3) we are usually hit by at least one significant hurricane during the season which runs from June 1 to November 30); and (3) if you include waterspouts (actually tornadic winds over a body of water), then we also are the tornado capital of the United States (no, we don’t get much press because our dinky tornadoes very seldom come close to the F5 monsters in Oklahoma and other southwest and midwest states).

 

Oh, and there is one other increasingly bothersome issue.  We have 1,350 miles of coastline with about half on the Gulf of Mexico to our west and half on the Atlantic Ocean to our east. Way back in pre-historical times, Florida was not just surrounded by water it was mostly underwater. Not so surprisingly, then, today most of Florida is at or very near sea level.

Ah, yes, and there is the really big rub.

Our local yellow sheet, the Bradenton (Florida) Herald, has this bold front-page headline this morning: “Rising seas could cost area $25.4 billion in homes.”

The rub, you see, is climate change and rising sea levels are already causing major problems in many cities in Florida (Miami, Tampa, Anna Maria Island, etc.). And a new study by the folks at Zillow.com (the real estate search engine folks) — based on the data released by the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration —  warns that the following 10 cities nationwide will be in a catastrophic world of hurt within 100 years (that means being swamped by an additional 6 feet of water):

  1.  Miami, Florida
  2. New York City, NY
  3. Tampa, FL
  4. Fort Myers, FL
  5. Boston, Mass.
  6. Upper Township, New Jersey
  7.  Salisbury, Maryland
  8. Virginia Beach, Virginia
  9. Bradenton, FL  (yep, right here in Paradise)
  10. Naples, FL

 

Do you see a pattern here? Five of the ten listed cities are in Florida. Yikes.

Florida -- climate change - 'Visit While you Still Can'

More specifically, the study warned that the 15 or so cities and towns from the Bradenton area down to North Port could have more than $25 Billion in damages to our homes by the year 2100. Bradenton and beautiful Siesta Key would each have over 5,000 homes destroyed or heavily damaged.  

Because of that, I just won’t hang around for 100 years. I’m reminded of a joke about a scientist who was lecturing about how some distant planet would hit and destroy Mother Earth in 2,400,000 years. Some redneck in the audience widely raised his hand and asked the professor to repeat the timeline. “Yes, sir. Approximately 2,400,000 years.” And ol’ Bubba said, wiping his brow, “Oh, gee, I’m glad you cleared that up. I thought you said only 2,300,000 years.”

Put it in your “Facts to Remember” file.

Try a Little Kindness

2016--97--11 'Smile and Wave' - Bradenton Herald - Part 1 of 2

2016--97--11 'Smile and Wave' - Bradenton Herald - Part 2 of 2

A Last Word on Hurricane Irma

2017--11--08 House Prices Still Increasing in Manatee and Sarasota Counties

Aging -- Florida -- rooster saying, 'The older we got the less we care'

Amen, Brother!

Share this with your friends who just can’t wait for deer hunting season to start.

Animals - deer - hunting -- CLOSE TO HOME cartoon 2017-11-08

Smile . . . And Be Happy

Bradenton, FL -- 14th Happiest City in USA - 2017-10-25

[Bradenton, Florida named one of America’s happiest cities]

Florida -- we live where you vacation

 

2017--11--08 Waterloo, IL -- Stan Paregien Jr's 1937 Oldsmobile

[photo of Stan Paregien Jr.’s 1937 Oldsmobile in Waterloo, IL on Nov. 8, 2017]

2017--10--02 01 Scott AFB, Belleville, IL - Lt Col Stan Paregien and new recruit

Lt. Col. Stan Paregien Jr. helps induct a law enforcement officer into the Air Force Reserves. Scott AF Base in Belleville, IL.

2017--10--04 01 Peggy Paregien and Allie - Bradenton, FL

Some people and some pets have it rough . . . and some, like Queen Allie, above,

do not. Peggy bought this “doggie stroller” a while back.

2017--10--13 01 Palmetto, FL - Bob and Jean L'Hullier with Peggy & Stan Paregien on Peg's birthday

Stan & Peggy Paregien (right) with neighbors and friends Bob and Jean L’Hullier in Palmetto, Florida at a riverside restaurant in October.

2017--10--28 07 Bradenton, FL - Peggy Paregien at the Halloween party at Plantation MHP - by Stan Paregien

[Peggy Paregien in photo on Halloween]

One reason why I keep posting items on this account is because I enjoy reading the statistics on who is visiting my blog. Please understand, I don’t really get t-h-a-t many visitors per day. But, boy, I do get a variety. Just in the last two weeks, people from these nations have stopped by:  the United States, Germany, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, Philippines, Latvia, Russia, Norway, China, Switzerland and Netherlands.

Pretty neat, huh? Welcome to all of my long-distance readers and . . . I hope . . . friends. Please stop by again, real soon.

Until next time,

Stan

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Issue 368 – Boy Scouts vs. Girl Scouts

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The Paregien Journal   –   Issue 368   –   Oct. 27, 2017 

Boy Scouts vs. Girl Scouts

I read an article in the Wall Street Journal this week which was a bit shocking. The writer, a former administrator with the Girl Scouts of America, told a bitter struggle which is going on right now between the Boy Scouts of America and the Girl Scouts. Seems that the Boy Scouts’ membership has been hemorrhaging for several years, as times change and fewer boys join the scouts and many older ones are dropping out. So, if you’re in charge of money and growth at the Boy Scouts, what do you do?

Ah, ha. Thought you’d never ask. What the big boys in suits and ties decided was to kick their doors and membership open to girls. Not only that, they developed an aggressive recruiting plan to go after Girl Scout employees, troop leaders and girls to migrate to the winning team before they were all left high, dry and lonesome.

Hmmmm.

That just didn’t seem like a neighborly thing to do, not between folks setting the example for your young folk. So I sat down and wrote a little song in protest, put some guitar chords with the words and videotaped it, then posted in on Facebook and elsewhere. And today I revised the song as a poem. Each has the same title: “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts.”

Girl Scouts of America - 02

Anyway, here they are, starting with the poem.

Poem 477 Mamas, Don't Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts -- Stan Paregien Sr - Oct 27, 2017

Mamas, Don't Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts -- Stan Paregien Sr - Oct 25, 2017 -- Page 1 of 2

Mamas, Don't Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts -- Stan Paregien Sr - Oct 25, 2017 -- Page 2 of 2

Please take time to click on this link and watch my four-minute video of me playing my guitar and singing my song. It is on YouTube:. Just “cut and paste” this information into your browser’s address box:   

https://youtu.be/n-_iMT3rPgk

Oh, by the way, I’m gonna buy a few extra boxes of Girl Scout cookies this year. And maybe you and I can come up with other ways to help the organization. What do you think? And more importantly, what are you going to do?

Girl Scouts of America

 

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Issue 367 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    –     Issue 367     –     Oct. 27, 2027

 

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 3:

1870 to 1902

[Note: Most of the information in this 3-part blog may be found in the research which I did for my self-published book, Paregien Family History: 1816 to 2006. That book, published in 2006 and having some 675 pages, covers the following related groups: Paregien, Paregine, Peargin and Pearigen. — SP]

The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin”, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township and her occupation as “Domestic”. It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township. [RESEARCH NOTE: Did this child belong to Elizabeth Paregien??]

The St. Louis City Directory (which only lists the head of the household) for 1870-71 lists J.M. Paregien, “carpenter and builder,” with a business at 310 N. 7th St. and his residence at 1417 Cass Avenue. In December of 2004, Stan Paregien, Sr., tried to visit these spots. The business address is now part of a large area where the football stadium where the former St. Louis Rams team stands. And the residential address, close to the downtown area, is a vacant lot.

2004-104 St Louis, MO - Stan Paregien at the place where Jacob Paregien lived after 1865

Stan Paregien, Sr. in 2004 in front of 1417 Cass Ave., in St. Louis. The vacant lot to the left of this building was both the residence and business address for Jacob M. Paregien back in 1870. [Photo 2004-104]

The St. Louis City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for “J.M. Paregien”

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien)  to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

1874 -- 01 The Eads bridge was dedicated in St Louis on July 4, 1874and still operates in 2017

In 1874, the Eads Bridge, the very first bridge in St. Louis to cross the mighty Mississippi, was dedicated with famous  a famous Civil War soldier, General William T. Sherman presiding. It was Gen. Sherman who took his Union troops on the march across Georgia, destroying most everything in sight. That bridge is still there and in 2016 was carrying about 8,000 vehicles each day between St. Louis, Missouri and East St. Louis, Illinois.

14 Oct, 1874   –   Marriage of Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien) at age 16 to 21 year old Antoine (“Ollie”) Guion in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1874-75 Lists “Jacob Mac Paregien”, a carpenter, living on East Pennsylvania near Neosho St.

The Union Railroad Depot, a magnificent structure, opened at 12th and Poplar Streets. Today the old Depot houses dozens of upscale retail shops and restaurants and is still quite beautiful.

The 1876 directory lists him as “John M. Paregien, builder, Pennsylvania Ave. near Neosho. And it lists Jacob’s son, Samuel, as a laborer who boarded at the same address.

So, the last documentation we have of him living in St. Louis is in 1876.

28 Jan., 1876   –   Death of 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

According to other sources, Holy Trinity was a “poor man’s” Catholic Cemetery where mainly German and some Irish immigrants from north St. Louis were buried. In 1878 it was called “New Bremen Cemetery”. And in 1909 city fathers decided to use that land to create O’Fallon Park and they ordered the graves to be moved to Calvary Cemetery at 5239 W. Florissant (Calvary Cemetery Association, 5239 W. Florissant, St. Louis, MO 63115    Phone 381-1313). In July of 2005, I went there and they checked their computer and had no record of Melinda Paregien.

In 1876, Holy Trinity Catholic Church, itself, was located at 3519 N. 14th St. (14th St. & Mallinckrodt St.) in the community of New Bremen. It was just north of where the St. Louis city limits ended in that day.

On 19 Sept., 1877, the steamer Grand Republic burned down to the water’s edge as it lay at dock in the Mississippi River there at St. Louis. “The steamer Carondelet, laying alongside, was burned at the same time” (E. W. Gould, Fifty Years on the Mississippi. St. Louis, Mo: Nixon-Jones Printing Company, 1889, p. 436).

That second steamer, the Carondelet (named after a suburb of St. Louis), was one of the warships that James Alexander Paregien saw on the Tennessee River during the battles of Ft. Heiman and Ft. Donelson back in February of 1862.

It was in 1878 that John Pulitzer bought the bankrupt St. Louis Dispatch newspaper at auction. His name is now best-known for the annual prizes in literature.

1880

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien as a farmer who was 64 years of age (born in 1816 in Kentucky) and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri [main town in the area is Rolla, Mo.]. (Note the spelling of the first name for Jacob’s wife. That is the same spelling of her first name as given in the 1900 Census, when she was living with son Henry Pearigen and he listed her last name with the same variant spelling that he used. This is why we are now using the name of “Avis” as the first name for Jacob’s second wife. She listed her age, in 1880, as 52; occupation: “keeping house”)

The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  [RESEARCH NOTE:  Any school records available in Phelps County, Missouri?]

And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien.

Our Only Connection to Ireland

The 1880 Census says that both Jacob and his wife were born in Kentucky. His wife’s father was born in Georgia and her mother in South Carolina. SPECIAL NOTE: The Census says that Jacob’s father was born in IRELAND and his mother in SOUTH CAROLINA.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34-year-old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22-year-old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

 [NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card, # 494-40-4933, while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William Parmley.]

In addition, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists seven “Peregin” family members. One, an Ann C. Peregin, age 20 and born in about 1860 in Missouri, was a single white female living with her niece in Black River (Lawrence County), Arkansas.

Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced?

It is believed that Jacob Paregien worked as a Methodist minister and a carpenter during the last years of his life. [RESEARCH NOTE: Would there be a record of his ordination or other documentation with the Methodist Church?] 

Now, concerning the family connection with Ireland. We have found no other documentation, other than Jacob’s affirmation for the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, that any of the family came from Ireland. He did state that his father was from Ireland. Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Doug Paregine) firmly believed that Jacob was from Ireland, as she said Doug told her that on many different occasions [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in 1970].

In about 1970, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Jacob’s son, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien – or “Paregine” as Doug spelled the name) said that her father (Doug) investigated and all the Paregiens that he could find were definitely related to them.

Further, Lillian said that Doug always told them that his father (Jacob Paregien) “went back to Ireland to try and find some of the Paregien family. All he could find in Ireland was a Catholic priest. He was kinda afraid he was an illegitimate child by ‘Father Paregien’. Ha-ha.”. [Interview with Evelyn Paregien in Ventura, Calif., in 1970]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The photo on the previous page is of an unidentified woman standing in front of a house that Jacob M. Paregien supposedly built in St. Louis, Missouri (no date on photo). It was given to me by Melvin L. Pearigen in 1973. [Photo 1910-05]

In 1926, Lillian Paregine Hughes (daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine) received a letter from her first cousin, Eldora (“Dora”) Pearigen. Lillian told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that Dora told her in that letter about Dora’s father, Henry Clay Pearigen, going to St. Louis “to their old home place . . .  to see the house that his father built.” The house may have been the one pictured above, and Henry may very well have taken the photo.

Melvin L. Pearigen told me on Sept. 14, 1970 that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri.  That may be, but we just don’t have any proof. Ms. Corena Wegrzn, a volunteer genealogical researcher in Phelps County, Missouri sent an email to me on June 7, 2004. She said, “I did not locate Jacob Paregien (or near spellings) for a burial in Cemeteries of Phelps County, Missouri, Volume III. Nor did I locate him or any family in my records compiled for the state cemetery records. These records are not the complete records for all of Phelps.”

But then she added this: “I did locate a couple of marriages in the Phelps County (Missouri) Marriage book:

“(1)   “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This is certainly our Doug Paregine. It was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he met and married her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

“(2) Columbus F. Richardson, age 23 and Miss Mary A. Paregien, age 18. Jan. 19, 1883 (Book 3, pg. 092). Jonathan Harrison, Justice of the Peace (Rolla, Mo.) officiated. The groom was from West Plains (Howell County). J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”

Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900, perhaps in or near Rolla, Missouri.  The question remains: exactly when did he die and where is he buried?

1900

In the U.S. Federal Census for 1900 there is listed one   “Avis Pearigen” [this definitely is our Avis Paregien, second wife of Jacob Paregien, and mother of Henry Pearigen).

For some reason, Henry must have changed the spelling of his mother’s last name to match his own variation of the family name. The newspaper account of her death in the

Wapanucka, Oklahoma newspaper in 1902 lists her as ” Aries Pearrigen “. I guess if you’re going to get the spelling wrong, you might as well get both names wrong.

Is “Pearigen” the name under which she is buried and perhaps listed in a death certificate?

In the 1900 Census she is listed as 85 years of age and as having been born in Kentucky in about 1815. She is listed as the mother of the head of  the household (i.e., Henry Pearigen). She reported that she had given birth to 13 children, seven of which were living in 1900 (children by Daniel Parmley and by Jacob Paregien).

Further, Avis Paregien (i.e., Avis “Pearigen”) stated that she was a widow. That means Jacob M. Paregien died sometime between early 1883 and 1900. She also affirmed that she could neither read nor write.

(2)  Henry & Sarah Pearigen and children: Eldora Pearigen, Bird McKinley Pearigen, and Melvin L. Pearigen. Sarah reported that she had given birth to five children, three of which were still living. Henry’s occupation was listed as “farm manager” on rented land. Like many people of that day, he was a sharecropper. He worked the land and, in turn, gave a stipulated amount of the profits to the land owner.

That same 1900 Census listed in the same location  Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).  He had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

Thomas C. Guion’s wife was Lula M. Guion, age 18,  born  in Sept., 1881, in Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

When Did Jacob Mac Paregien Die?

When did Jacob Paregien die?  We don’t know, yet. However, he must have died sometime between Jan. 19, 1883 and 1900 . He was present at the marriage of his daughter Mary in 1883, but in 1900 Avis Paregien reported to the U.S. Federal Census taker that she was a widow.

In October, 2005, as I was doing a final review of the file on Jacob, I discovered a line that I had missed previously. My mother, Evelyn Paregien, had interviewed Lillian Paregine Hughes in 1970 and said that a letter from Dora Pearigen in 1926 stated her father—Henry Pearigen—told her that his father, Jacob Paregien, had died in Spadra, Arkansas (“near Coalhill or Clarksville”).  

At this date, I have no way to prove or disprove that assertion. I personally believe Henry must have been talking about his brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, who certainly did die there. Here, again, it is something that the next generation of Paregien family genealogists will want to pursue.

Death of Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley)

Paregien

After the death of Jacob Paregien, his widow — Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien — moved to Wapanucka (Johnston County) to live with their son, Henry Clay Pearigen.

The Wapanucka Press newspaper on Feb. 6, 1902 gave this notice of her death:

Mrs. Aries Pearrigen, aged mother of H.C. Pearrigen, died at her home in this city Tuesday morning. The deceased was 76 years of age, was a member of the Methodist Church of long standing, and was loved and highly respected by all who knew her. Remains were interred in the cemetery in this city Tuesday evening amid a concourse of heart-broken relatives and sorrowing friends. The Press joins many friends in extending condolence to the bereaved family.

So she died on Tuesday, 4 February, 1902 in Wapanucka. Note that in this newspaper article her first name is spelled “Aries” and her last name is spelled sort of the way Henry spelled his last name. That was an error even at that, of course, because Henry spelled his name “Pearigen” with just one “r”.

Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien is buried in or near Wapanucka. The question remains as to which cemetery that may be. Later in 1902 the town decided to abandon their current cemetery (“by the school”) to adopt “the Brown cemetery” [1 1/2 miles south of town ] as the official city cemetery. Presumably, she was buried in the first cemetery, but we don’t know as yet. Still later the Brown Cemetery was abandoned and people used the Rose Hill Cemetery about 1 mile north of town.

Adding to the mystery is a note I recently found from when I talked on the telephone with Melvin L. Pearigen (Henry’s son) on Sept. 14, 1970. I was in Stroud, Oklahoma and he was at 1625 Madrona Ave., St. Helena, Calif. He said that his grandfather, Jacob Paregien, died in Rolla, Missouri. And he said his grandmother was buried in the church yard of the old Presbyterian church near Wapanucka. So where is that?

In July of 2005, I made a trip to Wapanucka and actually visited the Brown Cemetery located about 1 1/2 miles south of town and east of the highway. Unfortunately, the cemetery is abandoned and has been vandalized. The few tombstones that remain have been knocked over and it is covered with tall brush. I would not recommend going there. I could not find her tombstone.

Then in August, 2005 I  re-read a brochure by Letha Channell Clark titled, “Wapanucka: Glory Days — Early 1900s”. In that she states that “The first church was a Presbyterian church built south and west of Button Springs. It was also used as the first school . . .  This was the first subscription school started in this area . . . and only those who paid could attend.”

Ah, ha!  It would appear, then, that Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien [ perhaps known as “Pearigen” while living with son Henry Pearigen in Wapanucka] was buried in the original cemetery on the grounds of the Presbyterian church south of town — but that cemetery apparently is not the same as the Brown Cemetery. The mystery continues.

In October of 2005, I discovered Button Springs listed on the internet as one of the “ghost towns of Oklahoma”. It suggests that Button Springs was the original town site for what is now Wapanucka, but that it was moved sometime before 1900 to the present-day Wapanucka site and gave up the name Button Springs for Wapanucka.

That web site gave the directions to the Button Springs town site as follows: From Highway 69, take Highway 7 west into Wapanucka. Turn left at the stop sign and go south (toward Coleman and Durant). Turn into the last school road and park. Walk up the hill and you are now in Button Springs.

Well, here is something else. In making my final review of my file on Jacob and Avis Paregien, I found a small note from a short interview I had done at least 12 years ago with my aunt, Loretha Paregien Young of Duncan, Okla. I asked here where her great-grandmother was buried. She said the location was one mile south of Wapanucka, on the west side of the highway, in the corner of the property and that there were only a couple of other graves there.

And, to make it even more interesting, I recently spoke with Mrs. Louise Faulk of Wapanucka. She has lived there virtually all of her life. She remembers where the Presbyterian Church and the school were located. She says they were just south of town, on the right (west) side of the road. She says there is a hay barn near the few remaining tombstones.

So, there is still plenty of work to do to resolve the seemingly conflicting information and to find the tombstone (if one every existed).

FOOTNOTES

 The 1880 U.S. Census lists Jacob Paregien’s second wife name as “Avis” Paregien. It says she was born in 1828 in  Kentucky, that her father’s birthplace was Georgia and her mother’s birthplace was South Carolina. One document dated 10 Feb., 1857 lists her first name as “Arias”.

The 1860 U.S. Census for Jackson County spells the Parmley name as “Parmlee”.

The database of the Illinois Land Sales shows that Daniel Parmley purchased some land on 13 Sept., 1853. Record ID #429949 shows that he bought 40 acres of lace at $1.25 per acre in a Federal sale. The description was: County 39, Section 15, Section Pat SWSE, Township 09S, Range 03W, Meridian 3. Archive: Volume #32, page 173.

Daniel Parmley’s father was Hiel Parmlee and his mother was Rebecca Hardin. No doubt that Rebecca Parmley was named after her paternal-grandmother.

The Jackson County, Ill., Index of Cemeteries indicates there is a “Paregin” buried in “21”. That can refer to one of the following cemeteries:  (1) McBride Cemetery – this cemetery is not accessible (private land; swampy; or something). It is located in Kinkaid Township, Section 34, SW corner of SW Quarter.  (2) Christ Lutheran Cemetery – located in Fountain Bluff Township, Section 35.      (3) Modglin Cemetery – located in Bradly Township, Section 26, far west “26”.  (4) Morris-Creath Cemetery – Sand Ridge Township, Section 9. We were warned not to visit this cemetery during the warm months, as it is awfully “snaky”. However, Daniel Parmley’s first home was on Big Muddy River “between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge” until they moved “further north, in the same county”.

There is a Worthen Cemetery in Jackson County. In Murphysboro, go south on 20th for 4 or 5 miles (will be on the right). Several families moved together to Jackson County from Kentucky, including the Worthen and Parmley families. In fact, Robert Worthen married Daniel W. Parmley’s sister, Rebecca).

RESOURCES

Jacob M. Paregien is listed in the Family Search International Genealogical Index as Film Number 1904030. He is also listed as Jacob M. Paregin under #1903907.

Jackson County Historical Society Museum in Murphysboro, Ill.

Illinois State Historical Library, Newspaper Microfilm Section, Old State Capital, Springfield, IL. 62701-1507.  217-785-7941.

Southern Illinois University Library at Carbondale, Ill.

U.S. Federal Census Records 1800  to 1930.

I did an Internet search on every name in this section in February, 2005.

 

______________________   End of Part 3 of 3   ________________________

 

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Issue 366 – Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2

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       The Paregien Journal     –     Issue 366     –     Oct. 27, 2017

Jacob Mac Paregien, Part 2:

1857 to 1869

by Stan Paregien

 

Second Marriage: 

Avis  Murdon Parmley

On Feb. 10, 1857, widower Jacob Mac Paregien married a widow named Avis Murdon Parmley, of Jackson County, Ill. (His name is listed as McPerigirn” and her’s as Arvas Parmley” and the Justice of the Peace who performed the ceremony was Benjamin M. Redfield. –Register of Marriages: 1843-1958, Jackson County Courthouse). See the notes on the 1880 and 1900 U.S. Federal Census for why we have chosen to consistently use “Avis” as her first name.

Avis Murdon was born in about 1828 in Kentucky. Her father was born in Georgia and her mother was born in South Carolina (according to the 1880 U.S. Federal Census record, showing her at age 52 living with Jacob M. Paregien in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri).

Avis Murdon Parmley had six children by her first husband (Daniel Webster Parmley–he is buried in the Looney Springs Cemetery (Block 64, Lot 64) in Jackson County, ILL. It is located 3 miles west of Ava, Illinois on the north side of the highway. Stan and Peggy Paregien visited there, but could not find a tombstone).

Three of her children–John Wesley Parmley (born about 1842 in Ill.), Sarah Parmley and Robert  “Bob” Parmley (born about 1848 in Ill.)–died of typhoid fever in 1850.

So at the time of their marriage, Jacob brought seven (7) children to the dining table and  Avis Parmley brought three kids — for a total family of two adults and ten children.

Three of the children born to Daniel Parmley and Avis Parmley were still living when she married Jacob Paregien. Those children were:

  1. Rebecca Ann Parmley

Rebecca Ann Parmley was born about  1 Feb., 1846 in Ill.; (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. Addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky –far southwest Kentucky. She notes that Rebecca Parmley died “not too long ago”.)

The following information is from a booklet written by Mrs. Robert (Francis) Caudel (Rebecca’s daughter-in-law) on Feb. 1, 1940 to commemorate the life of Rebecca Ann Parmley. Lillian Mary Paregine Hughes, oldest daughter of Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine, gave a copy of the booklet to Stan Paregien back in about 1970.

“On her ninety-third birthday, February the first, 1940, Mrs. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel was the guest of honor at a large gathering of relatives and friends at the home of her son and daughter-in-law, Robert and Frances Caudel, 3028 West 36th St., Los Angeles, California, with whom she has made her home for twenty-six years.

“These pleasant birthday parties and the occasional meeting of the ‘Becky Ann’ Club arranged by her daughters, Mrs. Ida Wheatley, Mrs. Birdie Soloman and Mrs. Frances Caudel.

“This story of the ‘little old lady in lavender’ was prepared by Mrs. Frances Caudel, and presented to aunt Rebecca in printed form by Margaret and Fred M. Rolens.

“While California was still Mexican territory and gold had not been discovered on the Pacific Coast and the United States and Mexico were at war, a baby girl, Rebecca Ann Parmley, was born in Jackson County, Illinois, February 1st, 1847.

“James K. Polk was President of the United States, the eleventh in line, but that day in the snow-covered home all that mattered was that the tiny baby girl had been born prematurely and the parents and neighborhood midwife, Aunty Polly Worthen, had a struggle ahead to keep her alive.

“There was neither a Dr. Dafoe of Dionne Quintuplet fame nor a telephone to summon aid, but just the common methods used in those days.

“So in place of the modern baby incubator, little Rebecca was kept wrapped in sweet-oil soaked linen clothes for two months while the firmer skin, finger and toe nails, eyebrows and other accessories could grow for her future use as she traveled down the long trail.

“Her father was Daniel Webster Parmley, son of Ezekiel Parmley of Kentucky. Rebecca Ann’s mother was Arys Murdon Parmley. The mother [Avis] with her sisters Mary, Nancy, Charita Ann and brother Edward Murdon were also from Kentucky.

“The Parmley, Murdon, Hyres, Boone, Will and Worthen families had come about 1830 from Kentucky and settled in rich bottom lands and on hills of Jackson County, Illinois, staying close to the creeks and rivers when possible.

“Daniel Parmley had his home on the banks of Big Muddy River between Swallow Rock and Sand Ridge. It was a pretty spot for a home in this heavily timbered section, a few scattered meadows and the Kincaid Hills and Fountain Bluff nearby, with fertile sandy ridges for their garden and feed crops.

“Daniel Parmley built a tight, warm long home, with puncheon floors and Rebecca Ann could be kept very comfortable though she had arrived during a big snowstorm. Maybe that is the reason she still likes snow, though she is now content to just remember ‘Beautiful Snow’.

“When Rebecca Ann was about three years old [i.e., about 1850], an epidemic of typhoid fever broke out, which with malarial complications was the menace of the lowlands. She, with her sister and three brothers were very sick at the same time. Their mother cared for them day and night, but three of her children died, leaving only Rebecca and Harvey to comfort her parents, as they looked the last time on the three little ones, John, Sarah and Bob.

“Rebecca’s father decided to move his family to a healthier location further north, in the same county.

“Two years later [about 1852], when Rebecca was five years old, she had an attack of typhoid pneumonia and this time she was given up for dead and laid out in the ‘other room,’ and a messenger sent for a coffin. Her broken hearted father, mourning the loss of his daughter named for his two sisters (Rebecca and Ann), on removing the sheet from her face, detected signs of life and a feeble heart beat and overjoyed recalled the messenger. She was tenderly nursed back to health.

“Rebecca’s father, Daniel Parmley, had three sisters: Rebecca, who married Robert Worthen; Sarah, who married a Mr. Kirkendow; and Ann, who married William Hyres and at his death married James Plummer Watson. Daniel Parmley also had two brothers, Richard Parmley and Mathew Parmley.

“Her father purchased a farm, the deed to which was signed by President Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States.

“The father’s newly acquired farm in the higher part of the county had a fine stand of virgin pine, hickory, walnut and oak timber. Daniel and his partner, known to Rebecca only as ‘Dan’, cut logs and hauled them to the river, making it into rafts and floating them down the Mississippi river to New Orleans, Louisiana.

“It was a long journey. The return trip on flat boats was slow and tedious, but all was repaid by the well-filled bags of  silver they had received for the timber.

“Rebecca remembers welcoming the travelers and watching them divide the money, saying ‘This one for Dan, this one for Dan.’

“Also bright in her memory now are pictures of  the activities on that farm and the passing of the boats on the lower Big Muddy and Mississippi rivers (particularly the ones named, ‘Walk on the Water’ and ‘Silver Lake’). She also remembers walks with her father through the garden seeing ‘Love Apples’ (now known as tomatoes, but then considered rank poison) and she well remembers the time they shared their first tomato.

“In the meanwhile Mathew was born. A few years later, the father [Daniel Parmley], while away from home contracted pneumonia. The mother and three children on hearing of his sickness traveled overland by wagon and team, reaching him shortly before his death. He was buried in the Looney Springs burial ground, Jackson County, Illinois. [RESEARCH NOTE: Does anyone have a location in the cemetery or a photo of his tombstone? I visited there in about 2002, but could not find his grave. — SP]

“The widowed mother Arys Parmley left the farm, taking her three children, and lived with one of her brothers. Three years later the mother met Jacob McParegien, a widower with nine children. They fell in love as folks do. [Emphasis, mine. — SP]

“Rebecca’s little brother Harvey opposed the idea of any man taking his mother, and laid up a store of rocks, which he intended to use to chase the man away. But love won out.

“So Arys Parmley and Jacob McParegien were married and went to live on his farm nearby [emphasis mine, SP] where Rebecca and all the other eleven children helped their parents with the chores. One of the constant ones was to go down the hill a quarter of a mile to the spring to get water for the household uses.

“Rebecca could carry a full pail of water on her head and a full pail in each hand, the long path up hill from the spring. Perhaps that accounts for her erect carriage and fine poise to this day.

“The children carried corn and other feed to the hogs which were penned in, under an overhanging rock, which made a cave-like dry shelter.

“At night the children picked seed from the cotton bolls, each child having to fill one of his own shoes with seed each night. Lucky for Rebecca that her feet were tiny. They carded the cotton and spun it into thread. They also spun wool into yarn.

“Rebecca made the material which was woven into her first plaid dress of cotton and wool mixed, and the threads were dyed red, green, black and yellow.

“So their busy days hurried by until she was about thirteen years old, when the rumble of war was heard and all the young men and fathers, too, were called to the colors. [1861 — SP]  Then Rebecca and her half-sisters had to do the plowing, harvesting and all the rest of the hard work on the farm.

“Abraham Lincoln was now the President of the United States and had issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the Negro slaves. Many times the escaped run-away slaves appeared at the farmhouse.

“One time two of them had come to the smoke-house where the cured hams, bacon and other smoked meats were kept. One of the young lads in the family got his gun and with Rebecca at his side said he was going to ‘shoot that nigger’. Thrusting the gun through the wall, he was ready to shoot, when the Negro grabbed the gun and pulled it on through the wall and took it away with him, and the boy’s bravery suddenly melted into tears. The black men were harmless and only took two hams. Evidently they were too heavy, for they left one hanging on a tree near the farm.

“Rebecca’s step-father, Jacob McParagien [sic – SP], organized a company of soldiers and trained them for service, but he was denied the privilege of entering actual service on account of defective hearing.  [Emphasis mine — SP]

“While Rebecca was still in her early teens, her uncle and aunt, James P. Watson and Ann Parmley Watson, of Murphysboro, Illinois, invited her to come and make her home with them where there were better school advantages. She remained with them and their family, consisting of her cousins Bob, Mary, Carrie and Frankie, for many happy years.

“In the school she attended thee were two boys, John Haltwick and Don Ozburn, who did not like the grammar lessons. So when the time came to hear these classes, out through the window went the books, followed by the two boys, to the astonishment of the crippled school-master, Mr. McClarey, who crossed the room with the assistance of his faithful cane, and closed the window.

“About this time Rebecca commenced having her little love affairs, aided and abetted by her cousin Bob [Watson], who placed the ladder against the upstairs bedroom window and helped Beccy [sic – SP] escape to attend parties with him where she met and danced away the happy hours with the young soldier who afterward became her husband.

“Near the close of the Civil War the people of Murphysboro heard that a regiment of Union soldiers were to march through the town. Everyone was decorating their homes with flags and bunting, so Rebecca and her cousins thought they should do their patriotic bit. But in their home was a Confederate flag and Rebecca, not realizing the danger or the significance, waved the flag out an upper window. Her uncle [James P.] Watson, standing in the nearby courthouse door, where he was County Circuit Clerk, hastened home and disposed of the flag before the Union soldiers came by.

“While a young woman in the Watson home, she attended the Northern Methodist Church where she was converted and began the ‘Heavenly path that shineth more and more unto the Perfect Day’.

“When only seventeen, she had a class of younger girls in the Methodist Sunday School. She still can remember the names of them, Mary Butcher, Amelia Kennedy, Margaret Wilson and Anna Williams.

“When the Civil War was over and Rebecca twenty years of age, she was married to John Haltwick [on 30 March, 1867 in Jackson County, Illinois — Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, M731435, 1843-1879, 0968927  IT 2-3, Film]. And a very pretty picture she must have made with her curly black hair arranged into forty-two curls hanging down to her shoulders. The wedding dress was made of white swiss made with full skirt and full sleeves with a narrow band holding the fullness in at the hand.

“To them came four children, two boys and two girls. The two little boys were taken back into Heaven, one at two years of age, the other at fifteen months.

“The little girls, Ada and Carrie [born in 1875], grew to womanhood. The older one, Ada, passed away May 20, 1900. Carrie [Haltwick] Pigott is living today [1940] , in Murphysboro, Illinois.

“On April 20, 1877, after a married life of only ten years, Mr. Haltwick died. Rebecca was left a widow with two little daughters.

“In those days women were not trained to make their own way as they now are. So Rebecca, very well trained in the homemaking art, turned her hand to dress making and other things she could find to do.

“She was hostess in the town’s public library or reading room as it was known in those days. There she met Mr. Sion R. Caudel, a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the son of a Tennessee Baptist preacher. A few years later they were married. To them were born three children: Ida, Bob and Birdie Caudel.

“Life went on with its varied interests and tasks, such as housekeeping, tending babies, washing necks and ears, wiping bloody noses, wrapping up stubbed toes, kissing cut fingers, patching skinned shins and all the other joys of motherhood.

“She sent them to school and took them to Methodist Sunday School and sat with them in the pew at the Sunday morning service, at the same time serving four years as a Stewardess in the Church, an honored position.

“Again the Grim Reaper reached out his sickle for the ripened grain and the husband and father was gathered into the fold of the Redeemer above.

“One more Rebecca with faith and courage took up the burden and carried it cheerfully and well. Until one day the postman brought a letter from the Golden West, from her son Bob [Caudel], in Los Angeles, containing a railroad ticket and Pullman reservations and an invitation to ‘come up and see us sometime.’ She came, she saw, she conquered.

“That was twenty-six years ago. Today she is very happy to greet you, each and every one, on this occasion of  her ninety-third birthday, February 1st, 1940.”

The 1930 Federal Census states that Rebecca A. Caudel was living with her son, Robert W. Caudel and his wife Frances, in Los Angeles, Calif. Rebecca Ann Parmley Caudel died in California in about 1941 at the age of 94, we think. [RESEARCH NOTE: No record for her in the California Death Record index.]

According to the California Death Records, Robert Watson Caudel was born in Missouri on 2 June, 1881. He died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 20 Sept., 1950 at age 71. His wife, Frances Caudel, was born 23 Feb., 1876 in Kansas. She died in Los Angeles, Calif., on 25 Oct., 1950 at age 74.

  1. William Harvey Parmley

William Harvey Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in June, 1845 in Missouri. He married in about 1879 to Ellen _________________.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Jacob M. Paregien and his wife, “Avis” Paregien as living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. The Census lists five of their children living with them:  Samuel (son, age 26), Nancy (daughter, age 22), Stephen (son, age 18), Mary (daughter, age 16 — would have been born in about 1864 — during the Civil War), and Henry B. (son, age 12; actually Henry Clay Paregien).  And it lists three of their GRANDCHILDREN living with them:  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Clay Pearigen.

The 1880 U.S. Federal Census also lists just above the Paregien entry the William H. Parmley family. This was Jacob Paregien’s stepson (son of  Avis Parmley Paregien and her first husband, Daniel Parmley).  William Parmley is listed as a 34 year old farmer and his wife, Ellen as a 22 year old “Keeping House”. They had a 1-month old child, William R. Parmley.

[NOTE: There was a William Parmley born on 17 Nov., 1880 in Missouri. According to the SS Death Index, he received his Social Security card while living in Missouri. He died in zip code 64097, meaning the Wellington (Lafayette County), Missouri area — just east of Kansas City, Missouri. This may be our William R. Parmley, son of William H. Parmley.]

  1. Matthew Parmley

Matthew Parmley was born to Daniel and Avis Parmley in Feb., 1853. He married Carrie ________________. Lillian Paregien Hughes said that Matthew  was blind.

Jacob and his second wife and their large number of children lived on his farm. They hauled water to the house from a spring about one-quarter of a mile away.

 

CHILDREN BORN TO

JACOB  &  AVIS PAREGIEN

Jacob and Avis Paregien went on to have four children of their own (That made a total of 14 children sired by Jacob Paregien). Their four children were:

  1. Nancy Paregien

Nancy Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien, in about 1858, probably in Jackson County, Illinois. [See family photo: 1892-02.]

At age 16 she  married Anton (or Antoine) Guion (age 21) on 14 Oct., 1874 in St. Louis, Ill. by  Charles Picken, Justice of the Peace. Official witnesses were C.W. Guion and Lizzie Smith. [Marriage Index of St. Louis County. The marriage was filed and recorded on 29 Dec., 1874].  He definitely was of French heritage, as there are lots of Guion’s in Canada and France.

In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census the above three children were living with their grandparents, Jacob & Avis Paregien, at Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

The children were listed, with an error in spelling, as  May Gion (female, age 4), Maud Gion (female, age 3) and Thomas Gion (male, age 1). The correct spelling of their last name is “Guion”.

1880--03--B -- Nancy Paregien Guion - daughters May and Maud Guion

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion and daughters and an unidentified child. Date unknown. [Photo 1880-03]

1898--03 Nancy Paregien Guion-family

ABOVE:  Nancy Paregien Guion with family (and son-in-law??). Date unknown. [Photo 1898-03]

1898-02-NancyParegienGuion--StLouis

I’m a little confused about this photo. Taken in about 1898 (??), the label I put on it in about 1973 says it “shows (l to r) Nancy Paregien Guion (daughter of Jacob & Avis Paregien) and her mother Mrs. Jacob (Avis Murdon Parmley) Paregien. The woman on the right is Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion.  [Photo 1898-02]”. Now, I don’t know if that is correct. Instead, I belived the woman on the left is May Guion and the woman in the center is May’s mother, Nancy Paregien Guion. At first, I thought maybe the woman on the right was May’s sister, Maud. However, looking at the two previous photos of the sisters, they appear to be about the same height . . . but the woman at right in this photo is considerably shorter than May Guion. So she may indeed be Nancy’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thomas (Lula) Guion. That’s my best guess.

One source indicates that Antoine Guion was born in 1853 and his parents were Barthelmi Guion and Marguerite Barada. [http://www.stlgs.org/efdb/d238.htm#P27037 ]. This Mr. Guion’s age would be about right. [There was a much older Antoine Guion born in 1832 in Carondelet, St. Louis, Missouri. His father or maybe an uncle??]

Nancy and Mr. Guion had at least three children:  May Guion, Maud Guion and Thomas Guion.

Melvin L. Pearigen wrote me in on 30 April, 1973 and said: “I was through St. Louis in 1922. Her [“Aunt Nancy’] and her husband, he’s a Frenchman by the name of Guion, . . . owned a rooming house and was selling it to buy a chicken ranch near Springfield, Missouri. And that’s the last I ever heard of them.”

The St. Louis City Directory for 1880 lists Antoine Guion as a gardener (or a guard; “ard.”) and living on 4th Street near Fillmore.  We have a photo of a Mr. Guion with Henry Paregien. Further, the 1880 U.S. Federal Census lists Antoni O. Guion (age 27, a laborer born in 1853) living with his mother Margaret Guion. Had he and Nancy divorced or simply were not listed?

The 1900 U.S. Federal Census shows Thomas C. Guion, age 20 (son of Antoine Guion and wife Nancy Paregien Guion) living in Township 3, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory (Atoka County, Okla.). He was listed as head of his own household. He would have been Henry Pearigen’s nephew (i.e., Henry’s sister’s son).

Thomas C. Guion had been born in Missouri, as had his mother and father. His occupation was given as a farm laborer and he could neither read nor write, while his wife could do both. He, too, was a sharecropper.

His wife was Lula M. ________ Guion, age 18. She was  born  in Sept., 1881, in  Arkansas (both of her parents had been born in Tenn.). No children were listed. They had been married for two years (since about 1898).  They apparently followed or moved with Henry Pearigen and his family from St. Louis, Missouri to the area around Boggy Depot, Indian Territory. By the 1930 Census Thomas and Lula Guion were back in St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis City Directory for 1905 lists one “Nannie Guion” living at 1401 Chauteau Ave. Could this “Nannie” be our Nancy?

1910--04 HenryPearigen-OllieGuion Family

In the photo above, Henry Pearigen stands between his brother-in-law, Anton Guion, and his sister, Nancy Paregien Guion [Photo 1910-04]

1910--05 HouseBuiltBy JacobParegien

The 1930 U.S. Federal Census shows a Thomas Guion, age 51,  living with his wife, Lula Guion in the Independent City section of St. Louis (St. Louis County), Missouri. He was born to Antoine Guion & Nancy Paregien Guion in about 1879.

NOTE: A certain “Filbert Antoine Guion” died in Lincoln County, Missouri on 17, June, 1903. He had been born about 1854 in Missouri. [Source: Lincoln County, Missouri Deaths: 1866-1896, an online database created by Kenneth E. Weant.] 

 

  1. Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (later “Paregine”)

Doug Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, on 31 May, 1861 at Murphysboro (Jackson County, Illinois). 

Like his full-brother, Henry Clay Paregien,  Doug began using an alternate spelling of the family name. And while Henry spelled it “Pearigen” Doug spelled it  “Paregine.”  The big unanswered question is this: why they would take on such spellings, even when living close to other relatives who maintained the original spelling? Strange, indeed.

Apparently Jacob and Avis Paregien must have been impressed by Illinois politician and U.S. Senator Stephen Arnold Douglas so much so that they named their second child after him. It makes one wonder whether they ever heard the famous Senator speak in person. He debated his little-known Republican opponent Abraham Lincoln in many cities across Illinois in 1858 for the U.S. Senate seat. Douglas won that contest, but Lincoln beat him for the job of President of the United States in 1860.

Were the Paregiens registered Democrats?

The Phelps County, Missouri Marriage Book  lists one  “Stephen Arnold Douglas Parequin, age 19 and Miss Celia Lowe, age 18. July 24, 1881 (Record Book 3). Robert C. Adams, MG. Father of groom J.M. Pareqin. The wedding was held in Miller Township.” This was his first marriage. I spoke with one of his granddaughters, Marie Clark Palm, on Nov. 27, 2004 and she was not aware that he had been married before he wed her grandmother. Nor did she know that he had at least one child by Celia Lowe.

  1. Mary A. Paregien

Mary A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Paregien, in about 1864, near the end of the Civil War. This Mary Paregien is not to be confused with the Mary Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien.

The 1880 Census for Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri has Mary A. Paregien as age 16 and living with their mom and dad, Jacob and Avis Paregien.

Mary A. Paregien married Columbus F. Richardson, age 23, on 19 Jan., 1883. Jonathan Harrison, a Justice of Peace in Rolla, Missouri performed the ceremony. Columbus Richardson was from West Plains (Howell County), Missouri. The record states “J.M. Paregin was father of the bride.”(Phelps County Missouri Marriages, Book 3, p. 092).

As it turns out, Columbus Richardson is a very common name in the United States. And often the Census records show that the so-named person of a Black or Mulatto. In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census there was a Columbus Richardson (age 70, born about 1860 in Missouri) living in the Kansas City (Jackson County), Missouri area as a boarder.

  1. Henry Clay Paregien (later “Pearigen”)

Henry Clay Paregien  was born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien in St. Louis, Missouri on 4 Aug., 1867 (according to a letter by his daughter, Mrs. J.A. [Eldora Pearigen] Taylor, from Ardmore, Okla., on April 18, 1954. It was addressed to a Rev. William Harris Pearigen in Water Valley, Kentucky [far southwest Kentucky]).

For some unknown reason, Henry spelled his last name as “Pearigen”. So there is now an entire line of the family spelling it that way. And there are a great number of other folks, who may or may not be related, who spell their name that way (lots of them in Tennessee and Kentucky).

And to just make it more confusing, Henry Clay Paregien’s full-brother, Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien, also started using a variant spelling of the last name — and it was even different from the one Henry used! Doug Paregien became Doug “Paregine”.

 

______________ Miscellaneous Notes ________________

Lillian Paregien Hughes told Evelyn Paregien in 1970 that she remembered seeing her grandmother Avis Paregien. She said that Avis smoked a pipe, and she swept the floors with a short-handled broom, which she had to stoop to use. Lillian also recalled seeing her wash their clothes. They had a tree stump which they would beat their clothes on, after soaking them, to get them clean. She wore her hair slicked back in a knot.

In later life, Avis lived with her son, Henry Clay Pearigen, at Wapanucka (Johnston County), Okla.

On 1 March, 1859, there was a “James Parigen” of Iron County, Missouri who purchased 120 acres of land at or near Jackson (Cape Giradeau County), Missouri. The official land description was: The south half of the SE quarter and the NE quarter of the SE quarter of Section 22, in Township 32N of R4E, in the District of Sands.” This land is located only about 30 miles from the Paregien home base of Murphysboro (Jackson County), Illinois.  Was this our James A. Paregien, who would have turned 18 on 21 March, 1859?

1860

The 8th Census of the United States, done in 1860, for Jackson County, Illinois shows two Paregien-related families living in Township 8, Range 3W.

  1. William H. “Paragen” – #748 listing — a day laborer, age 23, born in Missouri. Also lists a female named Huldy Paragen, age 21, born in Illinois. Also lists Eliza J Paragen, born in Illinois and her age shown as “8/12”, meaning she was only 8 months of age. William H. Paregien was the eldest son of Jacob and his first wife, Nancy (or “Nanley”) Morgan, born on Nov. 23, 1837. Apparently he was living in his own home, with his wife and a child. [RESEARCH NOTE: Is there a birth certificate available in Missouri? ]
  2. Jacob “Paragen” – #749 listing — a farmer, age 44, born in Kentucky and married to Arris (or perhaps, “Avis”; hard to read the writing) Paragen”, age 34, born in Kentucky. Others living in that household included Jacob’s children by his first wife :(a) James Paragen – age 19, born in Ill; (b) Elizabeth Paragen – age 14, born in Missouri; (c) Sarah – age 10, born in Missouri; (d) Samuel – age 8, born in Illinois; and (e) Nancy – age 2, born in Illinois. It also included the children of his second wife “Erris” (or Aryns or Avis) — (a) William H. Parmlee – age 15, born in Missouri; (b) Rebecca Parmlee – age 12, born in Missouri; and (c) Matthew Parmlee – age 5, born in Illinois. And then there was a man living with them named Tobias Penrod, age 75, born in Pennsylvania.[Who the heck was he? ]

During the Civil War, Jacob M. Paregien organized a trained a company of soldiers for the Union Army. However, he was so hard of hearing that he himself could not enlist. His son, James Alexander Paregien, did join the service.

There is, however, a record of one “Jacob Peargin” (also spelled “Pergin”) being in the 7th Missouri Infantry, serving as a Private in Company G. (Box 000390, Extraction 0037)

The Military Census of 1862 for Jackson County recorded two Union soldiers who hailed from Levan Township (Town 8 South, Range 3 West):   (1)  William Perigan, age 27, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 81st Regiment; and (2) James Perigan, age 22, born in Illinois, a farmer, serving in the 27th Regiment.

1865  –  End of the Civil War between the northern states and the southern states.

1868  –   The approximate year when Jacob Mac Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien moved to St. Louis, Missouri.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

Louise E. Paregien,  one of  the daughters of Jacob & Nancy Paregien, married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869. [Her name may also be read as “Louisa E. Pariagein”]

   ________________________   End of Part 2  of 3  ____________________

Oh, hey, a couple of other things.

I am now publishing a free newsletter titled “An Encouraging Word.” It is a periodic publication, sent only once or twice a month. Our goal: “To share positive ideas and to encourage acts of kindness.” To be added to my mailing list, just write to me at paregien@gmail.com and in the subject line put “Encouraging Word.” Easy, huh?

Also, my most recent music video can be found online at YouTube. After I read how the Boy Scouts organization (reeling from large membership losses) was mounting an agressive campaign to recruit Girl Scout employees, troop leaders and girls. So I sat down and wrote a song titled, “Mamas, Don’t Let Your Girls Grow Up to Be Boy Scouts.” It is at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-_iMT3rPgk

Thanks.

 

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Issue 365 – Jacob Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 365  –  October 12, 2017

 

Jacob Mac Paregien: 1813 to 18??, Part 1

Paregien, Jacob M - no exiting photo -- maybe looking something like this in about 1866

 

 How Jacob might have looked at about age 50.

Introduction

I compiled the first Paregien Family History and published it in February of 1974. There were only a few people who were really involved besides me. That small number included my mom, Evelyn Paregien, my sister, Roberta Fournier, and Melvin Pearigen, Jewel Paregien Smith and Eura Paregien. That was about it. And those last three have been gone a long time now.

Thankfully, there were others who stepped up this time and gave me a hand. I especially want to thank Marie Paregien Walker, Roberta Paregien Fournier, Jan Harris Warner, Sandra Paregien Dudley, Marie Clark Palm, Amanda Pearigen, Kathy Peargin, Shirley Paregien Barrett and Clayton Moorman.

Are there typographical errors in this history? Are there factual errors in it? Do some families have much more material than others? Could it have been organized differently? Could it have been printed as a hardbound book rather than sold in the CD format?

Well, the answer to all those questions is “Yes”. And not just “Yes,” but “Heck, yes!”

The organization, final typing and editing has been a one-person project of monumental proportion. And I accept the blame for any errors or typos.

As to the format, I would welcome anyone who has deep pockets and wants to step up and put up the money to have it published as a standard book. But not many of us could afford something that would cost well over $150 each copy. So I chose to do it this way. Each person can print out the entire CD and put it in two or three three-ring binders, thus having a nice and quite functional copy. Or one may take it to a print shop and have them print it out and give it a professional binding and, . . . shazam! . . . , have a real book. Or some may choose to just print out the section dealing with their particular branch of the family. There is great flexibility, so it is your choice.

As to some families having much more material in the book than others, the fact is that some families simply donated more information and more photos than others did. Some lines did not provide any information or photos at all. None. Nada. Zip. So the minimum information that is contained here was all I could find. My goal all along was to be as inclusive as possible.  And it is.

Deciding how to organize this history was a much more difficult task than you might first think. After much consideration, it seemed to me that the best way to organize this book would be to first present the history of our patriarch, Jacob Mac Paregien, and his  thirteen (yes, 13) biological children and three stepchildren in the first section, called “Our Roots”. The remaining individuals and/or families then will follow in alphabetical order by their legal names at birth. So that is what I have done.

You will see markers such as [2001-027] in the captions next to most of the photographs and illustrations. That is simply my personal method of indexing my large collection of photographs and graphics. When the date in the caption does not match the date of the marker, the date in the caption is most reliable.

It may be helpful for you to start this history by studying the Overview, at the end of this section. That will help you to see how the different “pieces” or families fit together.  

Folks, this is about it for me. I have put much of my life into collecting information and photos of the Paregien family. It has been a rewarding and satisfying experience, but it has consumed about enough of my time and energy. There are other things in life that I still want to do.

So with this book I am passing the torch to whoever has the interest and the dedication and the love of history to take up the challenge. I’ll be glad to help those who have questions, but what you see in print here is virtually everything that I know about the family. And when I don’t work with the information regularly, it sure fades fast.

Finally, I want to dedicate this book to three very important and special women in my life: my wife and best friend, Peggy Allen Paregien;  my mother, Evelyn Cauthen Paregien Spradling; and my sister, Roberta Paregien Fournier.

Happy reading,

Stan Paregien

March 1, 2006

Part 1:    1816  to  1857

It is thought that Jacob Mac Paregien was born on April 12, 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. We do not know the names of his parents. Jacob stated in a U.S. Federal Census for 1880 that his father was from Ireland and his mother from South Carolina.      [With the publication of this history in 2006, I am passing the genealogical torch to the next generation. Perhaps they can trace our roots back to our European origin. –SP]

The 1860 U.S. Census of Jackson County, Ill., listed Jacob “Paragen” (age 44) and married as having been born in Kentucky. But the family tradition, at least for the Frank Paregien branch and the Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine branch,  is that Jacob was born in Northern Ireland and came to the U.S. as a stowaway at the age of 14 (about 1830).

The Family Search Ancestral File (ID # 10511984) says that “Jacob M. Paregin” was born in 1816 in Warren County, Kentucky. Please be advised that you will find the name Paregien spelled 50 different ways, due to the particular writer’s indifference or literacy.

The major town, today, in Warren County is Bowling Green (the county seat). Ironically, in 1962-63 Stan Paregien traveled to Bowling Green, Kentucky from Nashville every Sunday for about a year. He preached for a little country congregation, Mars Hill Church of Christ, outside of Bowling Green. He had no idea, back then, that he was near the birthplace of his great-great-grandfather.

Map -- Bowling Green, KY -- 2017

Warren county was formed in 1797. It is located in the Pennyrile and Western coal field regions of the state. The elevation in the county ranges from 395 to 955 feet above sea level.

Nancy Baird wrote this of  Bowling Green (Warren County), Kentucky: “In 1821 the Bank of the Commonwealth established a branch office on the square and by 1827 the town boasted a locally owned newspaper, a resident physician, a private school for boys (a school for girls opened in the Presbyterian Church in the mid 1820s), a Masonic lodge, at least one church, two tiny hotels, a number of mercantile shops and an array of other business establishments. Most structures housing a commercial venture also served as a residence for the owner. The courthouse provided meeting space for congregations without buildings and numerous rural log structures provided space for both school and church meetings. A stagecoach line connecting Bowling Green to Louisville, Nashville and Hopkinsville rumbled into town three times a week to discharge and pick up the mail and passengers. The round trip between Bowling Green and Louisville (180 miles) took three days and cost $12.

“From its inception Warren County’s residents depended on the Barren River as an avenue for commerce. In the winter when the river was high, flatboats loaded with tobacco, ham, whiskey and other farm produce began the arduous trip from a warehouse on the river’s edge to New Orleans. The flatboat journey down river and return by wagon or on foot (steamboats did not paddle up the Mississippi and Ohio until after 1814) required about six months. Goods not produced locally came by wagon from Louisville or Nashville on roads that were little better than an animal path, an erratic and expensive mode of freighting.

“After the advent of the steamboat on the Ohio River, local businessmen urged that the narrow, winding, snag-filled Green and Barren rivers be improved sufficiently for steamboats to ascend to Bowling Green. Without such river trade, warned a newspaper editor, “we can never be independent or prosperous.” Discussions and delays followed but eventually a company of young volunteers cleared the worst snags and overhanging trees. In January 1828 a tiny, single stack steamboat, the United States, arrived at Bowling Green and its cargo of a few boxes of sugar, tea, coffee and other items was unloaded and displayed on the riverbank. A local miss later recalled that she could not believe that so much could ever be consumed by the town’s residents.

“During the 1830s the state authorized improvements on the Green and Barren and eventually provided for the construction of locks and dams. On the completion of these projects, paddle wheelers could ply upriver to the Bowling Green boat landing.” (from A HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY)

1840

Jacob Paregien was living near Murphysboro in Jackson County, Ill., when the 1840 census was taken. He may have bought land in Section 31, W/SE sometime prior (Saline Land Grant). That record, taken by Dr. John Logan,, lists “Jacob Peregin” and a white female as living in “Township 7 — Ora”. There is an “Ora” township just north of the “Oraville” community on the Jackson County map.

Murphysboro, IL - Welcome sign - 2017

Welcome sign for Murphysboro, Illinois

Murphysboro, IL - map of Illinois with star on Murphysboro

Map of Illinois, with Myrphysboro at the bottom.

Map -- Murphysboro in Jackson County, IL and surrounding area

Map of the region around Jackson County, Illinois

Map -- Jackson County, IL                               Map of Jackson County, Illinois with Myrphysboro as the County Seat   

Dr. John Logan donated twenty acres of land for a new county seat in Murphrysboro, Jackson County, Ill., in August of 1843.

Jacob M. Paregien’s first marriage was to Nancy Morgan (born 9 April, 1821 or 1822  in Warren County, Kentucky). Her father was  Robert H. Morgan and he was born 19 March, 1786 in North Carolina. Robert Morgan  married Hannah Moyers Myers on  5 Feb., 1812 in Warren County, Kentucky. She had been born about 1794 in Tenn. The web site of Warren County Genealogical Society has her name spelled as “Hanniah Mires,” but the date is the same (http://www.burgoo.com/). Robert Morgan died in September, 1855 in Jackson County, Ill.

Nancy Morgan’s siblings were: Margaret Morgan (born 1826 in Kentucky), Martha Jane Morgan (born 25 Feb., 1825 in Warren County, Ken.; died 13 Sept., 1948 in Jackson County, Ill.)

Jacob and Nancy (Morgan) Paregien had nine children. We only have a photo of one of these nine children, James A. Paregien.

  1. William H. Paregien

William H. Paregien was born 23 Nov., 1837 . He was born in Missouri, according to the 1840 U.S. Census for Jackson County, Ill.  He married Huldah McCann on 11 Jan., 1859. — Jackson County Illinois Marriages: 1857-1866, p. 27).

(Also: See the information below on the 1860 Census, below, which states that at age 23 he was living with his wife, “Huldy” and daughter Elizabeth in Jackson County).

On 21 Sept., 1852, William Paregien bought 40.12 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W. Then on 30 Sept., 1852 William Paregien bought .12 acres of land for $1.25 in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NENW, Range 02W.

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1868-69 lists “Jacob Perigan,” carpenter, living at 1417 Cass Ave. It also lists his son, William H. Perigan, as a laborer and living at the same address.

28 Jan., 1876   –   A 5-yr old Melinda Paregien died of bronchitis at 1214 W. 9th St., St. Louis, Missouri. Who is she?? Could this have been a daughter of William and Huldah Paregien?  Melinda Paregien was buried at Holy Trinity Catholic Cemetery, and the undertaker was listed as “Father,” meaning probably that he dug her grave and buried her. [St. Louis Death Registers — City, County, 1850-1908 — Vol. 7, p.57.  St. Louis County Library Film #RDSL 16 ]

  1. James Alexander Paregien

James Alexander Paregien was born 21 March, 1841 in Murphysboro, Ill. (State of birth so noted in the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Ill.).

See more under a separate listing for James A. Paregien in Chapters 4-8.

  1. Mary Jane Paregien

Mary Jane Paregien was born 24 June, 1844. At the tender age of 14, she married James Ward on 25 Nov., 1858. (Marriages Index, Jackson County Courthouse, p. 37).

The 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows a Mary Ward, born in Illinois in 1844, married to a John Ward (blacksmith). That may or may not be our Mary Jane Paregien Ward.

It is important not to confuse this Mary Paregien, born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien, with the Mary A. Paregien born to Jacob Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley Paregien.

  1. Emily Elizabeth Paregien

She was born 30 Dec., 1845 in Missouri (according to the 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois).The U.S. Federal Census of 1870 for Jackson County, Ill., lists an “Elizabeth Peregin“, age 22, born in 1847 in Missouri as living in Kincaid Township.

It also lists a Melicy A. Peregin, age 2, born in 1867 in Illinois as living in the same Township.

[The 1870 Census for Lauderdale, Alabama (Township 2, Range 8) lists an Eliza Peregin, age 36, born in 1833 in Alabama. It also lists a Nancy Peregin, age 1, born in 1868 in Alabama as living in the same Township.]

30 Oct., 1873   –   Marriage of Elizabeth Paregien, age 27,  (daughter of Jacob & Nancy Paregien) was married to Richard Connell in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 30 Oct., 1873.  William Powers, a Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony.  [St. Louis County Wedding Records, filed and recorded on 29 Jan., 1874]

There is no listing for them anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census that I can find. Both the names Richard Connell and Elizabeth Connell are very common.

  1. Sarah A. Paregien

Sarah A. Paregien was born to Jacob Paregien and his first wife, Nancy Morgan Paregien on 10 March, 1849 (??) in Missouri (according to 1860 U.S. Federal Census for Jackson County, Illinois). There is no mention of her in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census, anywhere.

There is no mention of a Sarah A. Paregien anywhere in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census, when her father and stepmother and several siblings were living in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri. She would have been 31 years of age then.

  1. Robert H. Paregien

Robert H. Paregien was born 24 March, 1849 in Jackson County, Ill. He died in 1857 at about age 8. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has his name as Robert F. Paregin.

  1. Louise E. Paregien

Louise (or perhaps Louisa) E. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien  on 26 Dec., 1851. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has her first name as Louisa and says she was born in 1853 in Jackson County, Ill.

She married Jonathan W. Moore in St. Louis (St. Louis County, Ill.) on 18 Feb., 1869.

  1. Samuel M. Paregien

Samuel M. Paregien was born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien on 10 Feb., 1853. One source (Family Search Ancestral File, ID #10511984) has him born in 1855 in Jackson County, Ill. The 1910 U.S. Federal Census has him born in 1852

One source says Samuel died 4 May, 1864, but I don’t think that is correct. Can a dead man get married? Perhaps. Or, more likely, he really did not die in 1864. There was a Samuel Paregien who married Mary C. Davis (Index to Female Marriages, Jackson County Marriages, Book 2, 121).

The St. Louis (Missouri) City Directory for 1872-73 lists “Samuel M. Paregein” living on east Pennsylvania Ave., between Neosho and Itaska, in Carondelet. It gives the same address for his father,  “J.M. Paregien

However, the 1880 U.S. Census shows Samuel Paregien, age 26, living with his parents and other relatives in Cold Spring (Phelps County), Missouri.

In 1907 there was a Samuel Paregien who owned land in Kincaid Township, IS, Range 4W of the 3rd PM, Block 24. The land is west of Kincaid Lake (The lake is man-made and was not there in those days) and is now owned by the U.S. Forest Service.

The 1910 United States Federal Census for Jackson County shows Samuel M. Paregien, age 57 (born in 1852 in Illinois), as living in Kincaid Township.

There is a  Sam Perigen  listed as buried in the Kincaid Cemetery.

  1. Thomas J. Paregien

Thomas J. Paregien was the final child born to Jacob and Nancy Paregien. He was born 20 Nov., 1854 in Jackson County, Ill. Could his full name have been Thomas Jefferson Paregien? It was common to name children after presidents or prominent people. Thomas J. Paregien died at age four, on 21 Feb., 1859, probably in Jackson County, Illinois.

___________

 

The 1830 Census for Jackson County, Illinois shows that there were only 86 white residents in the county who were over 50 years of age. The life span was not that great, back then. There were a total of 1,768 white residents and 62 black residents.

The 1840 Census Record taken by Dr. John Logan lists a “Jacob Peregin” and a white female in Jackson County, Illinois (Township 7 – Ora; sheet 11). This document was found at www.rootsweb.com/~iljackson/1840.html. There is a community north of Murphysboro named Oraville.

The 1850 U.S. Census Record shows Arys Parmley being married to Daniel, in the Jacksonville area [My sister, Robert Paregien Fournier, found this entry]

The web site for Illinois Land Purchases shows that Jacob “McParegien” bought a parcel of “Federal sale” land in a sale dated 28 April, 1853. And he bought another on 30 April, 1853.  The April 30 document says it was a Federal sale in which he bought .38 acres of land in County 39, Section 19, Township 09S, Meridian 3, Section NESW, Range 02W, for $1.25.  Jacob Paregien is also listed as “Jacob M. Paragin” (Township 7S, Range 2W,  Sec 31 WSE) and as Jacob “Peregin”.

On 26 Feb., 1855 “Jacob McParigren” was listed in a probate hearing as the executor of the will for a Mr. Samuel Perry (will on file at Southern Illinois University Library, File 1775).

It was on 3 Nov., 1855 that the probate of the will of  Daniel Parmlee was filed (File #1777), with the executor being Jesse W. Ward.  This was, no doubt, Daniel Parmley, the deceased husband of  Avis Parmley ( She then became Jacob Paregien’s second wife).

Jacob’s first wife , Nancy Morgan Paregien, died on 19 Dec., 1856 (just one year after her father died). Probably in Jackson County, Illinois.  [RESEARCH NOTE: Where is she buried?]

Overview

 Jacob M. Paregien & Nancy Morgan had 9 children (listed chronologically):

          William H. Paregien

          James A. Paregien 

          Mary Jane Paregien

          Emily Elizabeth Paregien

          Sarah A. Paregien

          Robert H. Paregien

          Louise E. Paregien

          Samuel M. Paregien

          Thomas J. Paregien

Jacob M. Paregien and his second wife, Avis Murdon Parmley, had 4 children:

          Nancy Paregien

          Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregien (changed his name to PAREGINE)  

          Mary A. Paregien

          Henry Clay Paregien (changed his name to PEARIGEN)

 

James A. Paregien (son of Jacob) and Harriet Brummett had 9 children:

            Hariett E. Paregien

            James Edward “Bud” Paregien

            George Walter Paregien

            Emey Evaline Paregien

            Jefferson Mac (“Jeff”) Paregien

            William Marion (“Will”) Paregien

            Alruettir Paregien

            Nancy Paregien

            Benjamin Franklin (“Frank”) Paregien

Nancy Paregien (daughter of Jacob) married Anton “Ollie” Guion and had 3 children:

            May Guion

            Maud Guion

            Thomas Guion

 

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine* (son of Jacob) married Celia Lowe and they had one child:

            Edd Paregine

Stephen Arnold Douglas Paregine and his 2nd wife, Mollie Mary Brooks Payne, had 3 children:

            Lillian Mary Paregine

            William Mack Paregine

            Grace Olive Paregine

Henry Clay Pearigen (son of Jacob) married Sarah Evangeline Taylor and they had 5 children:

            Eldora Pearigen

            Bird McKinley Pearigen

            Melvin L. Paregien

            Girl who died in infancy

            Another child

 

James Edward “Bud” Paregien married Julie Copeland and they had 1 child:

            William Reece Paregien (he began spelling his name as PEARGIN). He

                     married Lulu Lawson and they had 5 children:

            Marvin Peargin

            Douglas Peargin

            Orie Peargin

            William Olan Peargin

            Creda Peargin

            Richard Odell Peargin

James Edward Paregien and his 2nd wife had 1 and possibly 2 children:

            Bertha Paregien

            Warner (or maybe William) Paregien (??)

 Part 1 of 3 

 

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Issue 364 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    —    Issue 364    —    September 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3 of 3

[See Parts 1 and 2 for earlier portions of the story of our evacuation from Bradenton, Florida due to the imminent arrival of Hurricane Irma.]

On Thursday, Sept. 14th, we made a mad dash from our motel in Lexington, Kentucky about 20 miles west to visit Frankfort, Kentucky. That is where the state’s capital is, plus that is where the grave of he one-of-a-kind American hero Daniel Boone is buried. The first place we went was to the final resting place of Daniel Boone and his beloved wife Rebecca. A tall, impressively carved marker stands in the beautiful and historic cemetery across the Kentucky River on a bluff which looks out upon the State Capital.

2017--09--14 06--D Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--14 06--A Frankfort, KY - grave stone of Daniel Boone -2017--09--14 06--B Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--C Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--F Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--G Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--H Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--J Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 07--A Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--B Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--C Frankfort, KY - Ky Historical Society Bldg Quote from Happy Chandler - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--D Frankfort, KY - First Baptist Church building - by Sttan Paregien

Then we drove up to Williamstown, Kentucky. Never got to see the town itself. But we saw what draws many hundreds of people every day to the edge of town. Just off I-75 is an attraction named “Ark Encounter.” A bunch of some bodies invested a ton of money in this project. Taking the actual dimensions given in the Old Testament of Noah’s Ark, they built a 510 foot arch, with a ground floor devoted to a huge gift shop, some meeting room, etc. Then the ark itself — with all the birds and beasts and such all arranged two by two — takes up three full floors. We walked ourselves silly and were amazed by all of the displays and exhibits. We probably spent three hours or so there.

However, if you’re a serious student of the Bible and/or archeology and such, you really ought to buy a two-day pass. Then pace yourself by maybe spending two hours there on the first morning and after lunch another two hours. Same thing for the second day. My bet is you won’t even be able to see it all even then. It is H-U-G-E, as a car dealer in the Tampa area likes to shout in his commercials.

2017--09--14 11 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 12 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 13 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 14 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 15 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 16--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - by Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Stan and Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 17 Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien

After seeing the Ark Encounter, we had planned on driving on up to Indianapolis to visit Peggy’s eldest sister, Mrs. Charlotte Allen Richardson and her husband Bill. We thought we might spent a couple of nights there, then wander west to our son’s house near St. Louis for the duration of our evacuation from Florida. That is, we did not want to start back until we were sure we had our electricity back on and that food and gas supplies were adequate.

However, about then we got a call from a neighbor back home in Bradenton. She gave us the exciting news that our electricity had been restored (it had been off since last Sunday night). And she said it looked like our house had only very minor damages.

Hallelujah! Those were the words we were waiting to hear. We did a quick u-turn and headed back to Florida. However, I did not want to drive down I-75 again. So we went slightly west toward Nashville and I-65. We spent Thursday night in a very busy, small town named Franklin, Kentucky, right on I-65. We had perhaps the best night of sleep since we had been forced out of our home by Hurricane Irma.

On Friday, Sept. 15th, we left Franklin, Kentucky about 8:30 pm and drove through some patches of fog on the way down to Nashville. Getting through congested “Music City” was no easy task, but I guess it did prepare us for what was coming next.

After actually looking at a map and seeing that the lower part of I-65 took us way west toward Mississippi, we decided to boogie back over to Chattanooga and join back up with . . . yep, . . . I-75. There is some major road construction going on in Chattanooga, so it was stop and go all the way.

When we got to I-75. the pace of the hordes of southbound traffic moved along pretty well for the most part. That is, until we got to Hell. Yeah, you know — Hell, Georgia. Oh, okay, you may know it better as Atlanta. But I’m here to tell you that driving through Atlanta from 2:15 pm to 5:30 pm is as close as I want to get to hell.

2017--09--15 10 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--15 11 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

There were six lanes of traffic going each direction, but it all was going at the speed of a senior citizen snail. It was bad. No it was downright awful. I have driven in a lot of big cities — Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, St. Louis, Montgomery, Indianapolis, Columbus, and more. But I ain’t never in all my born days driven in anything that could compare to the helter-skelter of Atlanta. I came away from that white-knuckle experience crying, “No mas! No more! Never again!” Or to paraphrase the great Chief Joseph of Idaho’s Nez Pierce tribe who finally admitted defeat at the hands of the U.S. Army. He said, “As long as the grass grows and the water flows, I will fight no more forever.” And I said as I exited Atlanta, “As long as I am half-way sane, I will drive no more forever in Atlanta.” Amen and Amen!

We were physically and emotionally exhausted when we finally got to our . . . eh, well . . . 3rd rate motel in Macon, Georgia. After a few $160 per night hotels we just had to take something cheaper. It turned out to be okay. Certainly nothing fancy about the room, and the continental breakfast the next morning left much to be desired. But it was a bed and the room was air-conditioned . . . and they allowed pets. 

We set our alarm for 5:30 am on Saturday, Sept. 16th. And we hit the blacktop on I-75 at 6:40 am. We were going home. Nothing quite like that feeling after so many one-or-two night stands. There were pockets of very heavy traffic, especially about 11 am at all six exits or so to Gainesville. We wondered why the heck the traffic was backed up so far. And, bingo, we remember that the University of Florida “Gators” had a home football game that afternoon.

Amazingly, we managed to average about 66 mph on Saturday’s travel. We drove into our driveway about 2:00 pm.

2017--07--17 03 Cartoon - even anti-government folks ask for help after a disaster

2017--09--17 01 Bradenton, FL - Cartoon - linemen were heroes

2017--09--17 02 Bradenton, FL - home damaged - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--19 01 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--19 02 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

Yes, we did see a lot of trees down along the roads, all the way from central Georgia to Bradenton. And some of the residents in our 55+ community had some significant damage, with maybe 25 families still without electricity. Florida’s sauna-like summer heat and humidity are terrible for anyone without air conditioning, but it is especially hard on young children and on seniors. But, all in all, we were thankful the hurricane had not made a direct landing here.

Be it ever so humble, it is always a good feeling to get back home. And it is especially wonderful when the house that you half-way expected to lose in a massive storm surge of water is still in tact. Thank you, Lord.

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Issue 363 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

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The Paregien Journal   —    Issue 363    —    Sept. 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

You will recalled that we evacuated from our manufactured home community in Bradenton, Florida on Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 5th, and ran for the north country.

We spent a delightful two days with my cousin Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in their home on a hill in Kingsport, Tenn. That’s when the weather folks began  forecasting heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday, Sept. 12th. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

We decided to drive up to Corbin, Kentucky — hometown of two great Americans, Colonel Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame and our friend Mike Cook (a leading proponent of Bigfoot theories) of Sarasota. First, though we drove through miles and miles of Tennessee mountains with occasional rain and gusty winds. 

2017--09--12 01 Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-A Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-B Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-C Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

Actually, we barely went through the edge of Corbin as we drove 15 miles west to beautiful Cumberland Falls. We spent Tuesday night, Sept. 12th, there at the lodge.

2017--09--12 05 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 06 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 07 Corbin, KY - Colonel Sanders and KFC

2017--09--12 08 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 09 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 10 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 11 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 12 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 13 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 14 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 15 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 16 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 17 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 18 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 19 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien2017--09--12 20 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 21 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 22 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 23 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 24 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 25 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Stan & Peg Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 27 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 28 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 29 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 30 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 31 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 32 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 33 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 34 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 35 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 36 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 37 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 38 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 39 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 41 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 42 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 43 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien

2017--09--12 45 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 49 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien - by StanParegien

This was our second visit to Cumberland Falls. Our first one was almost 55 years ago, in the late spring of 1963. I was a student minister preaching for my first congregation — the Mars Hill Church of Christ northwest of Bowling Green, Kentucky. I am happy to report that the old church building, surrounded by fields of tobacco, is still being used (the congregation was founded in 1912). Anyway, one Saturday that we took three girls from our congregation with us for a day at Cumberland Falls. We all waded way out toward the middle of the Cumberland River (don’t try that downstream at Nashville) on solid stone. There was a lot more water that year than was flowing this time, but it was still beautiful.

Here are about all the photos we have related to the little rural church in the tobacco field almost due west of Bowling Green, Kentucky (though on the photos I put either southwest or southeast — guess I’m a bit directionally challenged).

1962-061 PeggyParegien-Stan formal--01

This is our formal wedding photo. As I recall, I had Peggy — who had worked for about a year after high school as a cosmotologist in Ventura, Calif. — cut my hair in a burr style, to say money on haircuts. I don’t recall how long that lasted. As I recall, it made me look a lot like one of the guys in the Three Stooges films — so it probably didn’t last long.

1962-093--A--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-093--B--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--A PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--B PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--C PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--A Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--B Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-096--Peg'sSSClass-BowlingGreenKY

1962-097 Map-BowlingGreenKY

1963-013 CumberlandFallsKY

1963-014 PegParegien CumberlandFallsKY

1963-016 BowlingGreenKY

1963-017 Sweat-RobertsFamily BowlingGreenKY

On the left, as I recall (and my recaller is badly bent, if not broken), is Mr. Roberts (father, I believe of the legendary Kentuck high school band teacher Joe Van Roberts). Next is Mr. Sweat. And the other man, at the far right, I think is Joe Thompson. I wouldn’t swear to this in any court of law, however.

On Wednesday, Sept. 13th, we had barely left the lodge when it began to rain. And rain and rain.  Hard rain, driving rain. You see, once in a while the weatherman gets it exactly right.

Frankly, I was worn out by the time we got to Lexington. So we checked into a motel and crashed for the afternoon and night. And it continued to rain most of the evening.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of “Fleeing Hurricane Irma.”

— Stan

 

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Issue 362 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal    –    Issue 362    –    September 21, 2017 

When “Hurricane Irma” became more than a run-of-the-mill tropical storm, the weather forecasters began to speak of it in superlatives. “Greatest storm in a hundred years.” “Larger than the state of Texas” (yep, that’s large alright). “Highest wind speed for a hurricane ever recorded.” “Catastrophic water surges followed by giant waves of 30 feet or higher.” “Total and complete destruction possible.”

Kinda makes a non-Floridian nervous.

2017--09--04 Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--A Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--B Hurricane Irma fast approaching US

That’s what happened to Peggy and me. We were going about our business as usual on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 5th. In fact, we were planning on flying out of Tampa on Thursday morning to spend the weekend in Lubbock, Texas. I was scheduled for my 17th year of performing my cowboy poetry and stories at the National Cowboy Symposium at the Civic Center in Lubbock. I hadn’t been in about six years, so I was getting excited about seeing many of my cowboy pals and palettes (yeah, I know, I invented that one).

That did not happen. About noon Peggy came into my study and told me that Governor Scott had just declared a state of emergency in Florida. They were expecting Hurricane Irma to rip through Florida like a chainsaw, leaving death and destruction in her wake.

It didn’t take us long to figure out that by now we had not one chance in heck of flying “standby” anywhere (Peggy worked for Southwest Airlines for some 15 years and earned us free — i.e., standby — flying privileges wherever SWA goes). All flights out of Tampa would be full of paying passengers, no doubt.

Then there was the additional problem of what to do with our dog Bullet. Oh, wait a minute, that was the name of Roy Rogers’ German shepherd. Our little Pomeranian is Allie, and we did not want to leave her behind in harm’s way.

So, with all other options ruled out, we hastily packed a few clothes, our important papers, plus some food and water and such. And, to get a start on what by Wednesday morning would become a marathon snail race, we left in our trusty Kia Sedona van by 3:00 p.m.

We spent Tuesday night at a high-dollar motel in Lake City, Florida, just a few miles south of the Georgia border. There were at least 10 other dogs staying in our doggie motel that night.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6th, we left Lake City, Florida about 8:30 p.m. and joined the heavy traffic headed north to who knows where. Our destination was the home where our long-time friends Darrel and Martha Russell live with their daughter and son-in-law and their boy (Christie, Todd & T.J.). They were all so gracious in putting us up for a couple of nights. We even spent some time perusing a very large antique shop in an old cotton mill in the town of Social Circle, Georgia. Check it out on a map, and you’ll see that the city limits is nearly a perfect circle. Why, I don’t know, even though I asked a few people. Must be a story there.

2017--09--06 Manatee County Preparing for Hurricane Irma - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--07 01--A Social Circle, GA - home of Darrel and Martha Russell - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--07 01--B Social Circle, GA - plaque - Psalm 93 v 04 by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 Old couple at a shelter in Bradenton, FL - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--09 US Rep Vern Buchanan visits Manatee County on Friday, Sept 8

2017--09--09 What to take to a shelter & what to expect - Bradenton Fl Herald

On Friday, Sept. 8th, the forecasters were saying that this part of Georgia could soon expect heavy rain and high winds . . . followed by widespread power outages. So we decided it was time to mosey on a bit further north. Peggy spent more than an hour on the phone trying to book a motel room in Chattanooga. None was available. Nary a single pad. Little did we know, in addition to the untold hundreds of refugees like us, they were hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. So Peggy finally found us a room about 40 miles further up the road at Cleveland, Tennessee.

We took a long way around Atlanta, to keep from fighting that urban traffic. We saw a few scenic spots, traveling the back two-lane and sometimes four-lane roads of rural Georgia. But mostly we saw stoplights and lots of lumber trucks and innumerable strip retail shops and such.

We finally arrived in Cleveland, Tennessee and checked into our motel. It was located right next to paradise, which is to say, next to a Cracker Barrel restaurant. We were a good little boy and girl, though, and avoided our normal “Southern comfort” foods. I’m about six weeks from my next doctor’s appointment and I am determined to exceed his recommendation for me to shed at least 20 pounds (over a 3 month period).

Soon after we had arrived, Peggy discovered that the little meeting we had with a strip of blown truck tire back near Lake City had not just put a dent in our passenger door . . . but it had knocked the peawadden out of the turn sign assembly on the front, passenger side of our car. It was just dangling by a thread. But, using virtually all of my mechanical skills, I found a bungee cord in my tool box. I flawlessly attached one end to a motor mount inside the engine compartment, stretched it down over our grill and expertly attached it to the assembly. Ah, the satisfaction of a job well done. For a while, anyway.

Saturday, Sept. 9th, dawned with a stunningly beautiful day. We left our dog in her large cage in our motel room, and we retraced our steps back to Chattanooga with a list of several things we wanted to see and do. As we approached the downtown area, near the area along the Tennessee River, we noticed how athletic all these Chattanooganites looks. Both men and women were slim and muscled up, with fancy athletic shoes, colorful athletic shorts and shirts, and even with athletic looking bicycles — some with tires no wider than my thumb.

Duh. Then we found out the city was hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. Hundreds of certified athletes and thousands of fans and families crowded the area we had to pass through. There were barricades everywhere so the public could not cross a street during a bycicyle race (not a good idea) or a foot race. We also got to see these way-too-fit folks swimming across the Tennessee River, when they all no doubt had perfectly good swmming pools back at their motels.

Well, here is where the plot thickens. As we were trying to get through this mass of athletic folks, Peggy missed seeing a step down off a curb and hurt her left foot. Not her ankle, the side of her foot. She was in considerable pain, but managed to hobble on down to the river — through three or four of those barriers — to where we bought tickets for the luncheon cruise aboard the Southern Belle Riverboat.

Since her foot was hurting and we were boxed in by the sports activities, we sat at that location for about an hour. Finally, we loaded onto the Riverboat. They had a big and private birthday party going on upstairs, but on the main deck there were probably only about 15 of us. But, off we went. It was a nice little river tour, with a guide giving some history of what we saw.

2017--09--09 05 Chattanooga, TN - World Championship Ironman and Ironwoman contest

2017--09--09 15 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River

2017--09--09 18 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 19 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 20 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

About two hours later, we discovered as we prepared to leave that Peggy’s foot was so swollen and sore that she absolutely could not walk. We informed the boat’s staff of what had happened and our predicament. There was no way she could climb the steep hill up to where all the events were going on. Nor could she manuever through the crowds, nor could she get far enough for me to bring our car close enough to pick her up.

After about 45 minutes of waiting for help, one of the uniformed boat staff — perhaps a captain himself — took a personal interest in our dilemma. He finally agreed to procure a golf cart and give both of us a ride to the streets up above. So this man named Daniel, dressed in a sharp uniform which perhaps passed for an official of some kind, weaved the cart through the barricades and up past the crowd. He even drove about three city blocks, on the public streets, to get to a corner parking spot about two blocks from our car. So, showing my own athleticism (I hate that word and other “ism’s” just like it), I sucked in my stomach and sorta jogged a lot of the way — even up hill — to get our car. I drove down and “Captain Daniel” helped Peggy into the car while I waved the impatient drivers around us. Bless you, Daniel, you were wonderful.

So we high-tailed it out of Chattanooga as fast as the numerous areas under construction and the heavy load of traffic would allow. I managed to get Peggy from the car to our motel room, then I skedaddled a couple of miles down the road to a CVS because they had a practical nurse on duty there. Right. Except, . . . that she had gone to supper right before I arrived. So I bought about $70 of home remedies and hurried back to the motel and put some ice on Peggy’s foot. That seemed to help, but all other activities were out.

We we were “forced” to sit in the room and eat the Sonic burgers I had picked up on the way back from CVS, . . . while we watched our University of Oklahoma “Sooners” (ranked Number 7 at the time) gave #2 ranked Ohio State “Buckeyes” a spanking they won’t soon forget.

In between plays and during the commercials, we watched the weather bulletins. And Hurricane Irma was shifting further west, away from Miami and headed directly toward Tampa (and us at Bradenton). Yikes. And to make matters even more interesting, they had warnings of heavy rain and high winds there in Cleveland, Tenn.

2017--09--09 05 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 1 of 2

2017--09--09 06 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 2 of 2

So . . . we phoned my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in Kingsport, Tennessee (in the northeast corner near Bristol Speedway) and pleaded on bended knees for them to put up a couple of refugees. Now, the Paregien family — our Paregien grandparents (Frank and Mattie) as well as Jerry’s mom and dad and my own mom and dad — know all about being refugees in a foreign country. They all left poverty-stricken Oklahoma in 1942 and moved to Ventura County, California in hopes of getting work in the war industry. And they did exactly that, and their lives and those of their descendants changed dramatically. They all went to work for the U.S. Navy at Port Hueneme (near Oxnard).

Anyway, Jerry and Muriel graciously agreed to take us in as long as we wanted or needed to stay. So we again loaded up Allie and our stuff, leaving Cleveland about 8:00 am on Sunday morning, Sept. 10th. We passed Knoxville and about the time we were to turn north, off of I-40, we saw a sign saying that Sevierville was just 15 miles on east. So we decided to take a quick tour. We stopped at a really beautiful Visitor’s Center and got a bunch of brochures.

That’s when one of the employees walked over the ladies who were helping me and told them their manager had called and said they would shut down at noon Monday because the National Park Service was shutting down the area parks because of dire predictions of heavy rain, high winds and probably trees falling and power losses.

That sure explained why we had seen a mob of cars and RVs headed out of Sevierville as we were headed into town. Now my momma didn’t raise no dummies, so I changed our plans and got right back on the road to Kingsport.

2017--09--10 08 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--10 09 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

We spent a delightful time with Jerry and Muriel in their hillbilly home. Well, okay, it is beautiful and spacious home on a hill, not a cramped log cabin by any means. We spent Sunday night and Monday night there. On Monday I took our car down to a nearby mechanic and he was able to stabilize the turn signal assembly . . . by putting a second bungee cord on it. Naw, not really. He was able to snap it back together for a temporary fix, as it is cracked and some “teeth” are missing.

However, the weather folks were now forecasting those same heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

Well, friends, we’ll continue the story of our evacuation from Florida in our next issue.

Thanks for stopping by.

— Stan Paregien

 

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Issue 361 – The Vietnam War

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 361  –  September 17, 2017

The Vietnam War

Tonight, Sept. 17, 2017 our local cable station will air on one of our PBS stations another new film series by master storyteller Ken Burns. Mr. Burns previously did such outstanding documentaries as “The Great Depression” and “The Civil War.” This one is no doubt his most controversial one of any he has done. It is titled “The Vietnam War.”

Vietnam War - Photos - 01 -- SV Police Chief killed Viet Cong suspect in Saigon in 1968

Vietnam War - Photos - 02 -- a SV plane Accidental dropped napalm on people, including 9 yr old Kim Phuc

Vietnam War - Photos - 03 -- American soldier in 1965 with 'War is Hell' on his helmet

Vietnam War - Photos - 04 -- Anti-war in Vietnam march in 1969 drew 400,000 people

Vietnam War - Photos - 05 -- American soldier saving 2 V children from danger

I plan to watch every hour of it, so that means a total investment over the next few weeks of 18 hours. Of course, if you miss it the first time around, it will be playing again in your area sometime in a year or two and periodically until Vietnam, . . . er, I mean . . . Hell freezes over.

There are lessons to be learned about our world, our nation and about ourselves if we will just pay attention. Here is some information about it:

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 1

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 2

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 3

The Vietnam War by Ken Burns -- intro to 2017 series

 

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Issue 359 – Back in the Saddle, Again

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A Periodic Publication    –    Issue 359    –    Augtust 9, 2017

The National Cowboy Symposium will be having its 29th annual celebration of all things cowboy – music, poetry, papers, chuck wagon cookoff, cowboy church on Sunday morning – preceeded by authentic chuck wagon cooking in 40 or so dutch oven (iron kettles) placed on coals on the ground (north of the Civic Center).  It is a busy place, with 6 stages running programs at the same time all day Friday and Saturday. Then they have a major show in the evening on Friday and Saturday nights from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. in the big auditorium. This event draws thousands of people to the Civic Center there in Lubbock, Texas each year. The date is Thursday evening, Sept. 7 through Sunday morning, Sept. 10th.

I just received word that I have been invited to perform there, again. This is, as best I can figure, my 17th  year to be one of the maybe 75 to 100 entertainers. My first year to perform, thanks to the Director – Alvin Davis – was in 1991. As you can tell from the photo, below, things have changed a wee bit. But I still have that “Tom Mix Grizzly Hat” I bought that year.

1991--002--StanParegien--PatsyMontana--Lubbock

Stan Paregien with singer, actress Patsy Montana in 1991

1991--035--LubbockTX--NatCowboySymposium---RichardFarnsworth----bySP

Movie stunt man and actor Richard Farnsworth

1991--036--LubbockTX--NatCowboySymposium---R-W-Hampton--BarryCorbin----bySP

Singer R.W. Hampton and actor Barry Corbin

1992--043--TX--Lubbock--Flether Jowers - Stan Paregien - Nat Cowboy Sym - by PP

Fletcher Jowers with Stan Paregien in 1992

 

1995--011--TX--Lubbock-- actor Barry Corbin -- Stan ParegienActor Barry Corbin with Stan Paregien

1998--043-- actor - Dale Robertson with Stan Paregien -- Lubbock, TX

Actor Dale Robertson with Stan Paregien in 1998

 

1999-030-- Lubbock, TX -- Natl Cowboy Symposium -- Stan Paregien with Elmer Kelton

Stan Paregien with famed Western novelist Elmer Kelton in 1999

 

1999-038-- LubbockTX -- Natl Cowboy Symposium -- Stan Paregien and Curt Brummett -- by Peggy Paregien

Stan Paregien with cowboy humorist and author Curt Brummett in 1999

 

2000-011--TX-Lubbock--DustyRichards-PaulPatterson-StanParegien

Western novelist Dusty Richards with Paul Patterson (author and humorist; and Elmer Kelton’s beloved high school teacher) and Stan Paregien in 2000

 

2002-056-- Lubbock, TX - June 9 - Will and Rhonda Stearns - Stan Paregien - National Cowboy Symposium - by P Paregien

Rancher and rodeo star Will Stearns and and wife/rancher/author/poet Rhonda (Sedgwick) Starnes with Stan Paregien in 2002

 

2002-060--A Lubbock, TX - James Drury - Stan Paregien - by P Paregien - June

Actor James Drury of “The Virginian” TV show with Stan Paregien in 2002

 

2006-1150-A Paregien-Stan Peg

Stan & Peggy Paregien

 

2006-1166 Smith-Dean Brimley-Wilford

Olympics track star, movie stunt man and actor Dean Smith with actor Wilford Brimley in 2006.

 

2007-1313--E--TX--Lubbock--Bumgarder-Paregien-Lopez

Cowboy poets: Scott Bumgardner, Stan Paregien & Adrian Lopez in 2007

2009-1127-D-StanParegien---byNCS

Stan Paregien in 2009

 

2011--1511--TX--Lubbock--NCS--Stan-PegParegien--Sept-10

Stan & Peggy Paregien in 2011

On Friday my first performance will be in a “Stories & Poetry” session in Civic Center Room 107. Others include Carol Glover of Amarillo, TX and June Cathey of Martin, TX. 

My second performance on Friday will be at 4:00 p.m. in a “Music” session in the Civic Center – Banquet drag” (i.e., bringing up the rear) at an outdoor “Music” session from 11 a.m. to 1:50 (long session). It will be in the “North Park” (just north of the Civic Center) at the Outdoor Stage. Those performing will be Craig Cortes and Zack Carey of Marathon, TX; Allan Chapman & Rodeo Kate of Ft. Worth; Stan Mahler of Olney, TX; Sid Hausman of NM; Bill Cate of Cleburne, TX; Mary Kaye of Escalante, UT; and your’s truly.

Then at 3:00 pm I will perform at a “Stories & Poetry” session in Room 107 of the Civic Center. Others performing will be ol’ saddle pal Roff Flake of Gilbert, AZ; and Gary Penny of Lorena, TX.

And my last performance will be at 4:00 pm in a “Poetry & Stories” session in the Civic Center, Banquet Hall 1-West. Other performers include David Hansford,  Ft. Worth, TX; and Jeff Posey of Ft. Worth, TX.

Y’all come, if you can. The host hotel, where a great many of the performs will stay (including Peggy and me), is the MCM Elegante Hotel & Suites (formerly the Holiday Inn Hotel & Towers) at 801 Avenue Q in Lubbock (directly west of and near the Civic Center). 806-763-1200

I have placed online nearly 100 photos of me and folks I have met at the National Cowboy Symposium since 1991. Counting the 29th event this September, I will have had the pleasure and honor of performing  at 17 or so of those annual events. I started when I was “not-so-old” and now I’m one of the senior Senior Citizens still telling stories and reciting poetry and doing a little music, all of the cowboy kind, of course. You may see all those photos at my Flickr account in the album titled “National Cowboy Symposium.” That is at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/111910623@N04/albums

 

Sam Elliott and “The Hero,”

His Latest Movie

Today, Aug. 9 th is the birthday of actor and all-around good guy Sam Elliott. Happy birthday, Sam, . . . and salute! He was born in 1944 in that old cow town of . . . Sacramento, CA. He started in films in 1969 and married Katharine Ross in 1984. Their stable marriage is unusual in glitzy Hollywood.

The first photo, above, shows Sam Elliott dressed in his familiar cowboy gear, as he had done a lot of  fine Western roles over the years (“The Sacketts,” “Tombstone,” etc. The second photo is of Sam and his lovely and talented wife, actress Katherine Ross. She is best known for her first major role years ago as the love interest for both Paul Newman and Robert Redford in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” Ironically, Sam was in that movie as well, but they never got a chance to meet during the filming. 

Ol’ Sam, with his deep and roughly melodious voice, has made a sizeable amount of money over the years doing voice over commercials for such outfits as the Dodge Ram pickup, the American Beef Raisers (“Beef. It’s what’s for supper.”), and others. He has worked pretty doggone steadily through all the years.

In my point of view, it is unfortunate that both Sam and Katharine (a minor role) got hooked up with the production of the 2017 movie, “The Hero.” The gist of the film is that he plays a has-been, once-famous cowboy actor who has reached old age with not much to show for it. He doesn’t have much money but he is able to drink like a fish and smoke pot to his heart’s content, a normal thing it seems . . . or at least there is no real objection to it. The self-center character has ruined his marriage with his wife (played by Katharine Ross), and made his daughter hate him with a deep passion. But he still has a few fans who stroke his ego from time to time. And he gets that old star-power feeling, temporarily, when a group of Western movie fans present him with their annual award at their convention. Yahoo. There is a constant street of vulgar language on the part of his character and that of a young woman — profane stand-up comedian — he beds down after he learns he is dying of cancer. Cut. And print. That’s about it.

This movie was a major disappointment for me. I felt sorry for Sam and Katharine for making such an odd, depressingly different film from previous ones. Frankly, I think the film had no redeeming virtues and I would warn fans of Sam to not get closer than the length of a football field from this dog. 

__________

 

Folks, Hold On to Your Forks!

by Stan Paregien

Copyrighted Aug. 8, 2017

Lonesome Omar died a while back

At the ripe old age of ninety-one.

He had no health issue to speak of,

So I guess maybe his work was done.

 

I knew him for years before I learned

His full name was Omar O’Dell.

At cowboying he was mighty good,

Though in his youth he was wild as hell.

 

He had the rough edges knocked off

By the Lord and sweet Lilly Ann.

One winter he caught pneumonia and

A wild bronc smashed his fighting hand.

 

Lilly Ann was ol’ Doc Hester’s nurse,

And she nursed and loved on Omar

Until he caught and married Sweet Lil’,

And he took up church and left the bars.

 

The ranch foreman let ’em live in a cabin

A hundred yards from his big house.

And for three years they reveled in life,

And Omar thanked God for his sweet spouse.

 

Twice a year they hosted all the cowhands

To a meal featuring tasty beef or pork.

At the end, before desert, she always said:

“Folks, be sure to keep your fork.”

 

That always meant something mighty good

Was coming next, like maybe a pecan pie

Or a chocolate cake – Omar’s favorite –

Decorated to delight any cowpoke’s eye.

 

There was a pond fed by a year-round spring

Where she liked to relax, bath and swim.

They figured two moccasins bit her arm

And she was dying so a rider went after him.

 

She died just after Omar arrived at a run,

And she spoke slowly so he would understand:

“My love, remain true to our Lord and

“Please, bury me with a fork in my hand.”

 

They say that was the last time Omar cried,

But vowed to honor her dying request.

They buried her next day near the cabin and

In her right hand a fine silver fork did rest.

 Eating Utensils - Fork - fancy silver-looking on a brown bkground

Omar himself said a few words to the

Ranch folk on that solemn, sad day.

“Sweet Lilly led me to Christ and gave

“Her love to me in every single way.”

 

“We worshiped at Oak School House

“With church folk ever time we could.

“When we had dinners on the ground,

“They’d say, ‘Keep your fork, if ya would.'”

 

“By that they meant they was gonna

“Uncover a passel of dessert and such.

“It was gonna be something real good

“And we looked forward to it so much.”

 

“Sweet Lilly always liked that saying,

“And with guests at our cabin she’d blurt,

“‘You good folks, keep your fork!’

“Just before serving a fine dessert.”

 

“So yesterday I knew exactly what she meant

“When she asked to go with a fork in her hand.

“We both talked about loving each other more

“Up in heaven gathered in that promised land.”

 

Well sir, folks ’round  here in Post, Texas

Loved ol’ Lonesome Omar, a friend to all.

He never remarried and usually drank his

Evening coffee by Lilly’s marker so small.

 

Ol’ Omar sorta adopted me ’bout 40 years ago,

A kid who didn’t know straight up about a cow.

So the cowboy skills I’ve gained in my own  life

Were by Omar taking his time to show me how.

 

 One day on the range we paused under an oak

And he told ’bout his wife and made me take a vow.

He said not to have no grief when the Lord took him,

‘Cause he’ been ready to go after Lilly died, anyhow.

 

So when he died in his cabin at 91,  I knew

Exactly what he’d want us cowpokes to do.

We built him a casket, put an old fork in his hand,

And buried him next to Lilly in the morning dew.

 Eating Utensils -- Fork - an old three-sharp-pronged fork with a wood handle -- 02

Now neighbor, I don’t know what you’ll do,

But when I die and you lower me into the land,

I’d be mighty grateful to ya and plum proud

If’n you’d put an old fork in my right hand.

_____

I wrote this poem, my 476th, in Bradenton, FL

on Aug. 8, 2017. It is based on a story by an

unknown writer that was posted online on the

Guideposts web site on Nov. 23, 2010.

_______________________________________________________

See ya down  the trail.

—  Stan

End.

 

Issue 358 – Catching Up

The Paregien Journal    –   A Periodic Publication    –    Issue 358   –   July 29, 2017

Catching Up

In my last post, some 16 days ago, I mentioned that I hoped to get on a more regular posting schedule. My intent was to published each and Thursday. Obviously, that didn’t happen and I don’t expect it to happen in the future. 

You see, friends, shortly after that I saw my doctor for my regular 6-month check-up. I was shocked out of my Justin boots by his diagnosis. Full-blown diabetes and a low-functioning thyroid. He told me to change my diet and to lose at least 20 pounds in the next three months. Then I might make it without going on a diabetic routine of meds. He did put me on a pill for the low-thyroid functioning problem. I have noticed that for the last three months or more I just did not have much energy. Low-thyroid will do that. So I started this med and it has knocked me for a loop: a headache for several hours each and every day; frequent nausea; inability to sleep from early morning to 11 pm or so (I had loved my afternoon naps); and no decreasing of my fatigue. After two weeks, those three of those four side-effects have faded. I’m still waiting for it to give me more energy.

Anyway, now you know . . . the rest of the story.  I have sub-titled this blog as “A Periodic Publication.” And that’s about the best I can do for the foreseeable future. Thanks for your understanding. 

A Birthday Bash

We’re having another birthday party for a local celebrity here in Bradenton, Florida. It will happen on Saturday, July 20th. He is a very popular guy and lots of folks come from far and near to take photos of him. That “him” is none other than ol’ Snooty, who was born on July 21, 1948, back when Harry (“Give ‘Em Hell”) Truman was sitting in the White House as President of the U.S.A. He’s not as old as I am, of course, but he is now ancient compared to his peers.

Okay, I’ll tell you . . . the rest of the story. Snooty is a manatee who has lived in a manatee-sized pool in the South Florida Museum for a long, long time. He was born in the Miami Aquarium down south, but packed up his bags and more here at the age of one. The manatees who live wild along Florida’s shores are odd-looking creatures. In the wild, they seldom if ever live beyond their 20’s. Fast-moving boats kill or badly injure many of these gentle giants each year. 

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Oh, did you know that Bradenton is a city in “Manatee” County? Yep, and the first community was called Manatee but was swallowed up by a faster growing upstart. And our town sits on the south bank of “Manatee” River.” There are lots of those Manatee around, though I have yet to see one in the wild.

Anyway, happy birthday to you Snooty. 

UPDATE:

Unbelievably, Snooty the Manatee died one day after his 69th birthday party. That was on Sunday, July 23, 2017. Officials reported that somehow an access panel door to his pool or aquarium had somehow been knocked loose. The huge, gentle creature was able to go underwater and swim into the small enclosure. When he did not have room to turn around and reach air, again, he drowned. It is quite a tragedy for our community. And those who literally grew up seeing and enjoying Snooty a few times each year were especially saddened.

*****

I am certainly sad to learn that Arizona’s Senator John McCain has been diagnosed with a very aggressive kind of brain tumor called glioblastoma. I have great respect for Senator McCain, though I think he should have retired a few years ago. He spent five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, and he was severely tortured — physically and psychologically — by the Communists during that time. In my book he is a true American hero and a fine gentleman. We hope and pray for his recovery.

*****

I see in “Today’s Birthdays” for July 20th that novelist Cormac McCarthy is now 84. His first novel, The Orchard Keeper, was published in 1965. You probably know him for his 2005 novel, No Country for Old Men, which was adapted into an award-winning film by Joel and Ethan Coen. The movie starred Tommy Lee Jones and one of the supporting cast was a gent we have met a few times at cowboy events, actor Barry Corbin. In 2006, his novel The Road, won a Pulitzer Prize for Literature. And also in 2006 he finished writing a play, “The Sunset Limited.” That was made into an HBO film starring  Samuel L. Jackson and Tommy Lee Jones (directed by Jones).

In the birthdays for July 29th I see the name of none other than Leonard Leroy “Buddy” Lee, born on this date in 1933 and celebrating his 84th year on Mother Earth. Okay, you probably know him better by his stage name, “Robert Fuller.” In 1952, barely out of his teens, he moved to Hollywood to try his luck at acting. He also attended actor Richard Boone’s acting school and started to get small parts.  In 1959, Fuller wanted to do Westerns and came in 2nd to Michael Landon for the role of “Little Joe” Cartwright of the Bonanza TV show.  But he kept auditioning and won a co-starring role of Jess Harper on the TV Western, Laramie. It ran from 1959 to 1963, and Fuller made lots of money and lots of contacts in the movie industry.

Fuller, Robert - on TV show Laramie -- 2

Fuller appeared in numerous TV Westerns and movies after that. However, his next really successful and lucrative deal was a non-Western. Actor (remember “Dragnet”) and director Jack Webb pestered him until Fuller accepted a co-starring role in NBC’s “Emergency!,” a modern, fast-paced TV medical drama. He got the role of Dr. Kelly Brackett, Chief of Emergency Medicine at the fictitious Rampart General Hospital. And his co-star was the lovely, talented pop singer and actress Julie London, who was the ex-wife of director Jack Webb. She was Nurse Dixie McCall. That show ran for five years, from 1972 to 1977. Long retired, Robert Fuller lives in north Texas. 

2017--07--17 04 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

2017--07--17 03 Stan Paregien Jr's new toy -- Jurassic Park jeep

This is the latest piece of business equipment (i.e., toy) purchased and painted and decaled by our son, Stan Paregien Jr. Are you ready for this? He also has an honest-to-Batman “batmobile” with a fake jet exhaust, a fully decorated “General Lee” as seen on Dukes of Hazard” TV show, an authentic DeLorean car with all of the “Back to the Future” gizmos inside and out a little VW all decked out as a Disney studio “love bug” with the number 53 on it. Yep. He is actually making a little money along the way by being paid by folks who want him to bring one of ’em to their corporate event, party, TV commercial and/or movie set. Not bad work if you can get it.

Well, folks, it is now 8:10 in the evening and I’ve been at this way too long. I had hoped to include more, but . . . I am plum tuckered out.

See ya next time.

— Stan

 

 

 

 

Issue 357 – We Enjoy Our Visitors

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The Paregien Journal   –   Issue 357   –   July 13, 2017

We Really Enjoy Our Visitors

During our marriage of 55+ years, Peggy and I have lived in several states and cities. I can safely say that none of them, except for our current home in Florida, has been known as a “tourist destination city.”  The region from Tampa, down through Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Bradenton, Sarasota, and Venice contains beautiful cities, beaches, museums and scores of other attractions. So hundreds of thousands of visitors flock here from all over the United States, Canada and Europe–especially during “the season” (November through April). 

Naturally, that old capitalism rule of “supply and demand” kicks in, with hotels raising their rates and still running at or near capacity, and restaurants hike their prices and still have waiting lines (even at . . . or maybe especially at . . . the “Early Bird Special” time of 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.). And then there is the additional traffic, . . . but don’t get me started on that.

So we are fortunate and happy to have a few more friends and relatives who come to visit us for a day several days. We are always glad host them and get caught up on their lives and the lives of our mutual friends. And we try to guide them to the best attractions in the area.

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Martha and Darrell Russell are very special friends of ours and have been for many years. We all met when Peggy and Martha each worked in the Southwest Airlines Reservation Center north of the airport in Oklahoma City. For several years, Peggy and Martha shared rides back and forth to work from our respective homes about 25 miles from the airport (in Edmond, Okla.). Then when we decided to move to Florida in June of 2013, these two generous souls volunteered to make the trip with us. In fact, Darrell had driven business-sized trucks for years and he accepted the role of chief driver of our rental truck. Martha and Peggy drove our van. 

Then a couple of years later they retired, sold their house, bought a Recreational Vehicle and started roaming all over the U.S. Then their daughter and son-in-law got transferred to Jupiter (over on Florida’s east coast; also where the aging movie star Burt Reynolds still lives) and they started living with there when not RV-ing. And just a few weeks ago, the whole crew moved to new digs up in Social Circle, Georgia. Google that town and scroll out and look at how the town is platted — in a doggone circle. Pretty strange.

Anyway, I think you catch my drift that we very much appreciate and love these two wonderful folks.

And, speaking of wonderful folks, . . . that leads us to James and Glenda Cotton of Edmond, Okla. 

2017--03--05 01A Palmetto, FL - James and Glenda Cotton - by S Paregien

We first met James and Glenda Cotton (of Marshall, Okla.) in a congregation in Oklahoma City where we were all attending. Since then, they have moved from her family farm to just on the far north side of Oklahoma City. We all four laugh all the time about how we were mismatched somewhere back in time, as Peggy and James share a great passion for searching for seashells and tinkering with stuff while Glenda and I are happy to watch the sunsets and read books. Last year Peggy and I rode with them from Edmond all the way through Texas and New Mexico up to Westcliffe, Colorado . . . to a friend’s cabin . . . and then took the long way home. Quite an adventure. And quite fantastic friends.

2017--03--26 02 Brian, Ruth, Muriel, Peg - Venice, FL - by Stan Paregien

Two of our newer retired friends who live in Venice are Dr. Brian and Ruth Smith, R.N. Before they were married, they each independently went to separate medical missions in Africa. A series of twists and turns took place, finally causing them to meet and to get married. They spent the last 20 years of their careers working in McAllen, Texas, moving to Venice in late 2015 or so for his health.

The photo above shows them with my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien (blue shirt) and his wife Muriel and with Peggy.  Both Jerry and I grew up a few miles apart in the wilds of Ventura County (just north of Malibu, etc.). He graduated (as did Peggy) from Ventura High School, while I graduated from Fillmore High School.  I had one sister, Roberta (“Berta”), but nary a single brother. Jerry has certainly filled that slot for me over the years, so I love him as my substitute physical brother and as my brother in Christ. It just doesn’t get much closer than that. 

Muriel and Peggy just seemed to hit it off from the first time they met. For one thing, they are both “P.K.’s.” Now those of you insiders in church circles know what that means. Each of them was a “preacher’s kid.” Muriel’s father, Dale Knowles, preached for ultra-conservative independent Christian Churches (and her brother, Victor Knowles, is a preacher and the long-time editor of ONE BODY, a magazine advocating Christian unity).  Peggy’s father, W.W. (“Woody”) Allen, preached for ultra-conservative Churches of Christ, mainly in Nebraska and in Ventura, Calif. But Muriel and Peggy share so many other interests that their relationship is very similar to that which Jerry and I have. 

2017--06--01 02 - Woody, Lisa, Ella King - Bradenton, FL - by Stan Paregien

Woody King is a son of Paula King and the late Bill King, making him a nephew to Peggy and to me. Woody’s parents farmed in Arizona and Texas, then moved to California and soon to Oklahoma’s oil patch(s), and in his adult life out to Portland, Oregon. Lisa’s parents live in Sarasota and it was Woody and Lisa’s wedding on beautiful Siesta Beach — attended by Peggy — that was a major influence in our moving to Florida. They have the one daughter, cute and smart little Ella. They work together as independent entrepreneurs.

Hey, here is a “blast from the past.”  This photo of Woody and others was taken at our little 10-acre “farm” northwest of Stroud, Okla., in 1981. I added the captions, of course.

1981--048--B---Woody-Gene-Evelyn-Chester-Jeff---StroudOK

That is my mom and step-father in back, and Woody’s younger brother Jeff at right.

2017--06--15 12 - Sarasota, FL - luncheon cruises - by Stan Paregien

Luncheon cruise on Sarasota Bay in mid-June, 2017

This photo is of Stan and Peggy Paregien with their one and only daughter, Mrs. John (Stacy Evelyn Paregien) Magness. Stacy (cook in a nursing home) and John (foreman for a company in the oil field service business) and their adult daughter Christal live in tiny Snook, Texas just west of Bryan/College Station (think “Texas A&M”).  They have lived in Texas all of their married lives. This was Stacy’s first trip to Florida. We hope someday, since her husband John refuses to fly at all, to hog-tie him and load him on a plane and get him here, too. Stacy, by the way, is our greatly loved “chosen child,” as we adopted her in Oklahoma when she was two years old. Their older child, Dylan, works with his father and lives in College Station with his girlfriend. Their first baby is a beautiful girl named Presleigh.

That is Stacy’s picture on the left, at about the same age as Presleigh.

The note in my newspaper for July 7th’s “Birthdays” included the one and only . . . Doc Sevrinsen. Okay, if you’re under 40 years of age you have probably never heard of him. But ol’ Doc, whose real name was Carl, turned 90 this year. He was the band leader during most of the years that Johnny Carson hosted “The Tonight Show” on TV. At one time he owned a horse ranch in Purcell, Oklahoma (which likes to call itself “The Quarter Horse Capital of the World”). He lives up in Webbed Foot Country (i.e., Oregon), and he still performs once in a while. He was especially noted for his wacky stage outfits and for his kinda “wacked out” stage persona, which I don’t know was for real or just an act. He was different, though.

Severinsen, Doc -- about 2016 -- trumpet player and band leader on NBC

Oh, and on July 7, 1954, that nobody truck driver from Tupelo, Mississippi actually conned some D.J. at WHBQ in Memphis to play his first record, “That’s All Right,” for the very first time. And the song was a heck of a lot more than “All Right.” Neither Sun Records nor the world of music would be the same for very long after that. I remember that this “rock ‘n roller” (or hillbilly rocker) in about 1955, when I was a student at Roosevelt Junior High School in Tulsa, came to town for a show. The place was mobbed. And the newspaper the next day on their front page had a photo of two or three of my female classmates trying to climb into Elvis Presley’s dressing room from a window on the outside wall. Ah, yes, the good ol’ days.

Presley, Elvis -- with his guitar in about 1955 - it is a 1955 Martin D-28 guitar

We had been giving some serious thought and discussion about flying to Japan to see that nation and to spent some time with our daughter-in-law Becky Paregien’s brother and sister-in-law, Mike and Tomoko McClain in the Hitachi coastal area north-east of Tokyo. . . .  . . Then, one of our Rwandan friends invited us to his wedding in September there in Rwanda, Africa. So we (mainly Peggy) shifted gears and started researching that trip, instead. The Rwanda trip was just too cost-prohibitive. So we (mainly Peggy) turned our attention back to that possible trip to Japan. After visiting with a travel agent, we decided the possible Japan trip was impossible for us. And for the same reasons:  $$$$$

So we have regrouped and are thinking of going two places instead of one: Paris and Rome.

Doesn’t that sound just wonderful?

Well, don’t get too excited. We’re talking (mostly joking) about driving to both Paris, Tennessee and Rome, Georgia. It would give us some bragging rights, if we just left off the state names. Then on second thought, . . . naw. Back to the drawing board.

Hey, we have a heck of a lot of fun with all of the folks here in our 55+ gated MHP, including such folks as long-time resident Pat Goeller. Read the sign on her shirt.

 

2017--04--11 01 Bradenton, FL - Pat Goeller - by S Paregien

Well, friends and neighbors, that’s it for this time. Thanks for stopping by and “Y’all come, ya hear?”

— Stan Paregien

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