Monthly Archives: September 2017

Issue 364 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3

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The Paregien Journal    —    Issue 364    —    September 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 3 of 3

[See Parts 1 and 2 for earlier portions of the story of our evacuation from Bradenton, Florida due to the imminent arrival of Hurricane Irma.]

On Thursday, Sept. 14th, we made a mad dash from our motel in Lexington, Kentucky about 20 miles west to visit Frankfort, Kentucky. That is where the state’s capital is, plus that is where the grave of he one-of-a-kind American hero Daniel Boone is buried. The first place we went was to the final resting place of Daniel Boone and his beloved wife Rebecca. A tall, impressively carved marker stands in the beautiful and historic cemetery across the Kentucky River on a bluff which looks out upon the State Capital.

2017--09--14 06--D Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--14 06--A Frankfort, KY - grave stone of Daniel Boone -2017--09--14 06--B Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--C Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--F Frankfort, KY - Stan Paregien at grave of Daniel Boone - by Peggy Paregien2017--09--14 06--G Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--H Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 06--J Frankfort, KY - grave of Daniel Boone - by Stan Paregien2017--09--14 07--A Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--B Frankfort, KY - State Capital Building - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--C Frankfort, KY - Ky Historical Society Bldg Quote from Happy Chandler - by Sttan Paregien2017--09--14 07--D Frankfort, KY - First Baptist Church building - by Sttan Paregien

Then we drove up to Williamstown, Kentucky. Never got to see the town itself. But we saw what draws many hundreds of people every day to the edge of town. Just off I-75 is an attraction named “Ark Encounter.” A bunch of some bodies invested a ton of money in this project. Taking the actual dimensions given in the Old Testament of Noah’s Ark, they built a 510 foot arch, with a ground floor devoted to a huge gift shop, some meeting room, etc. Then the ark itself — with all the birds and beasts and such all arranged two by two — takes up three full floors. We walked ourselves silly and were amazed by all of the displays and exhibits. We probably spent three hours or so there.

However, if you’re a serious student of the Bible and/or archeology and such, you really ought to buy a two-day pass. Then pace yourself by maybe spending two hours there on the first morning and after lunch another two hours. Same thing for the second day. My bet is you won’t even be able to see it all even then. It is H-U-G-E, as a car dealer in the Tampa area likes to shout in his commercials.

2017--09--14 11 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 12 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 13 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 14 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 15 Williamstown, KY - replica of Noah's Ark2017--09--14 16--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - by Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Stan and Peg Paregien2017--09--14 16--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 17 Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--A Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--B Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien2017--09--14 18--C Williamstown, KY - Noah's Ark - Peg Paregien

After seeing the Ark Encounter, we had planned on driving on up to Indianapolis to visit Peggy’s eldest sister, Mrs. Charlotte Allen Richardson and her husband Bill. We thought we might spent a couple of nights there, then wander west to our son’s house near St. Louis for the duration of our evacuation from Florida. That is, we did not want to start back until we were sure we had our electricity back on and that food and gas supplies were adequate.

However, about then we got a call from a neighbor back home in Bradenton. She gave us the exciting news that our electricity had been restored (it had been off since last Sunday night). And she said it looked like our house had only very minor damages.

Hallelujah! Those were the words we were waiting to hear. We did a quick u-turn and headed back to Florida. However, I did not want to drive down I-75 again. So we went slightly west toward Nashville and I-65. We spent Thursday night in a very busy, small town named Franklin, Kentucky, right on I-65. We had perhaps the best night of sleep since we had been forced out of our home by Hurricane Irma.

On Friday, Sept. 15th, we left Franklin, Kentucky about 8:30 pm and drove through some patches of fog on the way down to Nashville. Getting through congested “Music City” was no easy task, but I guess it did prepare us for what was coming next.

After actually looking at a map and seeing that the lower part of I-65 took us way west toward Mississippi, we decided to boogie back over to Chattanooga and join back up with . . . yep, . . . I-75. There is some major road construction going on in Chattanooga, so it was stop and go all the way.

When we got to I-75. the pace of the hordes of southbound traffic moved along pretty well for the most part. That is, until we got to Hell. Yeah, you know — Hell, Georgia. Oh, okay, you may know it better as Atlanta. But I’m here to tell you that driving through Atlanta from 2:15 pm to 5:30 pm is as close as I want to get to hell.

2017--09--15 10 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--15 11 Atlanta, GA -- hell on wheels - by Peg Paregien

There were six lanes of traffic going each direction, but it all was going at the speed of a senior citizen snail. It was bad. No it was downright awful. I have driven in a lot of big cities — Los Angeles, San Francisco, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, St. Louis, Montgomery, Indianapolis, Columbus, and more. But I ain’t never in all my born days driven in anything that could compare to the helter-skelter of Atlanta. I came away from that white-knuckle experience crying, “No mas! No more! Never again!” Or to paraphrase the great Chief Joseph of Idaho’s Nez Pierce tribe who finally admitted defeat at the hands of the U.S. Army. He said, “As long as the grass grows and the water flows, I will fight no more forever.” And I said as I exited Atlanta, “As long as I am half-way sane, I will drive no more forever in Atlanta.” Amen and Amen!

We were physically and emotionally exhausted when we finally got to our . . . eh, well . . . 3rd rate motel in Macon, Georgia. After a few $160 per night hotels we just had to take something cheaper. It turned out to be okay. Certainly nothing fancy about the room, and the continental breakfast the next morning left much to be desired. But it was a bed and the room was air-conditioned . . . and they allowed pets. 

We set our alarm for 5:30 am on Saturday, Sept. 16th. And we hit the blacktop on I-75 at 6:40 am. We were going home. Nothing quite like that feeling after so many one-or-two night stands. There were pockets of very heavy traffic, especially about 11 am at all six exits or so to Gainesville. We wondered why the heck the traffic was backed up so far. And, bingo, we remember that the University of Florida “Gators” had a home football game that afternoon.

Amazingly, we managed to average about 66 mph on Saturday’s travel. We drove into our driveway about 2:00 pm.

2017--07--17 03 Cartoon - even anti-government folks ask for help after a disaster

2017--09--17 01 Bradenton, FL - Cartoon - linemen were heroes

2017--09--17 02 Bradenton, FL - home damaged - by Peggy Paregien

2017--09--19 01 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--19 02 Bradenton, FL - tree damage - by Stan Paregien

Yes, we did see a lot of trees down along the roads, all the way from central Georgia to Bradenton. And some of the residents in our 55+ community had some significant damage, with maybe 25 families still without electricity. Florida’s sauna-like summer heat and humidity are terrible for anyone without air conditioning, but it is especially hard on young children and on seniors. But, all in all, we were thankful the hurricane had not made a direct landing here.

Be it ever so humble, it is always a good feeling to get back home. And it is especially wonderful when the house that you half-way expected to lose in a massive storm surge of water is still in tact. Thank you, Lord.

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Issue 363 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

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The Paregien Journal   —    Issue 363    —    Sept. 21, 2017

Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 2

You will recalled that we evacuated from our manufactured home community in Bradenton, Florida on Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 5th, and ran for the north country.

We spent a delightful two days with my cousin Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in their home on a hill in Kingsport, Tenn. That’s when the weather folks began  forecasting heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday, Sept. 12th. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

We decided to drive up to Corbin, Kentucky — hometown of two great Americans, Colonel Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame and our friend Mike Cook (a leading proponent of Bigfoot theories) of Sarasota. First, though we drove through miles and miles of Tennessee mountains with occasional rain and gusty winds. 

2017--09--12 01 Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-A Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-B Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

2017--09--12 02-C Bean Station, Tenn - senic view and info

Actually, we barely went through the edge of Corbin as we drove 15 miles west to beautiful Cumberland Falls. We spent Tuesday night, Sept. 12th, there at the lodge.

2017--09--12 05 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 06 Corbin, KY - Spent night at Cumberland Falls Lodge

2017--09--12 07 Corbin, KY - Colonel Sanders and KFC

2017--09--12 08 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 09 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 10 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 11 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 12 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 13 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 14 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--12 15 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls

2017--09--12 16 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 17 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 18 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls2017--09--12 19 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien2017--09--12 20 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 21 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 22 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 23 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peg Paregien - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 24 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 25 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - by Stan Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Stan & Peg Paregien2017--09--12 26 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 27 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 28 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 29 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 30 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 31 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 32 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 33 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 34 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 35 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 36 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 37 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 38 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 39 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 41 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 42 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 43 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien

2017--09--12 45 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - StanParegien2017--09--12 49 Corbin, KY - Cumberland Falls - Peggy Paregien - by StanParegien

This was our second visit to Cumberland Falls. Our first one was almost 55 years ago, in the late spring of 1963. I was a student minister preaching for my first congregation — the Mars Hill Church of Christ northwest of Bowling Green, Kentucky. I am happy to report that the old church building, surrounded by fields of tobacco, is still being used (the congregation was founded in 1912). Anyway, one Saturday that we took three girls from our congregation with us for a day at Cumberland Falls. We all waded way out toward the middle of the Cumberland River (don’t try that downstream at Nashville) on solid stone. There was a lot more water that year than was flowing this time, but it was still beautiful.

Here are about all the photos we have related to the little rural church in the tobacco field almost due west of Bowling Green, Kentucky (though on the photos I put either southwest or southeast — guess I’m a bit directionally challenged).

1962-061 PeggyParegien-Stan formal--01

This is our formal wedding photo. As I recall, I had Peggy — who had worked for about a year after high school as a cosmotologist in Ventura, Calif. — cut my hair in a burr style, to say money on haircuts. I don’t recall how long that lasted. As I recall, it made me look a lot like one of the guys in the Three Stooges films — so it probably didn’t last long.

1962-093--A--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-093--B--MarsHillCofC-BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--A PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--B PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-094--C PeggyParegien--girls---BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--A Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-095--B Peggy's Bible Class - BowlingGreenKY

1962-096--Peg'sSSClass-BowlingGreenKY

1962-097 Map-BowlingGreenKY

1963-013 CumberlandFallsKY

1963-014 PegParegien CumberlandFallsKY

1963-016 BowlingGreenKY

1963-017 Sweat-RobertsFamily BowlingGreenKY

On the left, as I recall (and my recaller is badly bent, if not broken), is Mr. Roberts (father, I believe of the legendary Kentuck high school band teacher Joe Van Roberts). Next is Mr. Sweat. And the other man, at the far right, I think is Joe Thompson. I wouldn’t swear to this in any court of law, however.

On Wednesday, Sept. 13th, we had barely left the lodge when it began to rain. And rain and rain.  Hard rain, driving rain. You see, once in a while the weatherman gets it exactly right.

Frankly, I was worn out by the time we got to Lexington. So we checked into a motel and crashed for the afternoon and night. And it continued to rain most of the evening.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of “Fleeing Hurricane Irma.”

— Stan

 

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Issue 362 – Fleeing Hurricane Irma, Part 1

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The Paregien Journal    –    Issue 362    –    September 21, 2017 

When “Hurricane Irma” became more than a run-of-the-mill tropical storm, the weather forecasters began to speak of it in superlatives. “Greatest storm in a hundred years.” “Larger than the state of Texas” (yep, that’s large alright). “Highest wind speed for a hurricane ever recorded.” “Catastrophic water surges followed by giant waves of 30 feet or higher.” “Total and complete destruction possible.”

Kinda makes a non-Floridian nervous.

2017--09--04 Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--A Hurricane Irma fast approaching US2017--09--05--B Hurricane Irma fast approaching US

That’s what happened to Peggy and me. We were going about our business as usual on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 5th. In fact, we were planning on flying out of Tampa on Thursday morning to spend the weekend in Lubbock, Texas. I was scheduled for my 17th year of performing my cowboy poetry and stories at the National Cowboy Symposium at the Civic Center in Lubbock. I hadn’t been in about six years, so I was getting excited about seeing many of my cowboy pals and palettes (yeah, I know, I invented that one).

That did not happen. About noon Peggy came into my study and told me that Governor Scott had just declared a state of emergency in Florida. They were expecting Hurricane Irma to rip through Florida like a chainsaw, leaving death and destruction in her wake.

It didn’t take us long to figure out that by now we had not one chance in heck of flying “standby” anywhere (Peggy worked for Southwest Airlines for some 15 years and earned us free — i.e., standby — flying privileges wherever SWA goes). All flights out of Tampa would be full of paying passengers, no doubt.

Then there was the additional problem of what to do with our dog Bullet. Oh, wait a minute, that was the name of Roy Rogers’ German shepherd. Our little Pomeranian is Allie, and we did not want to leave her behind in harm’s way.

So, with all other options ruled out, we hastily packed a few clothes, our important papers, plus some food and water and such. And, to get a start on what by Wednesday morning would become a marathon snail race, we left in our trusty Kia Sedona van by 3:00 p.m.

We spent Tuesday night at a high-dollar motel in Lake City, Florida, just a few miles south of the Georgia border. There were at least 10 other dogs staying in our doggie motel that night.

On Wednesday, Sept. 6th, we left Lake City, Florida about 8:30 p.m. and joined the heavy traffic headed north to who knows where. Our destination was the home where our long-time friends Darrel and Martha Russell live with their daughter and son-in-law and their boy (Christie, Todd & T.J.). They were all so gracious in putting us up for a couple of nights. We even spent some time perusing a very large antique shop in an old cotton mill in the town of Social Circle, Georgia. Check it out on a map, and you’ll see that the city limits is nearly a perfect circle. Why, I don’t know, even though I asked a few people. Must be a story there.

2017--09--06 Manatee County Preparing for Hurricane Irma - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--07 01--A Social Circle, GA - home of Darrel and Martha Russell - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--07 01--B Social Circle, GA - plaque - Psalm 93 v 04 by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 Old couple at a shelter in Bradenton, FL - Bradenton Fl Herald

2017--09--09 US Rep Vern Buchanan visits Manatee County on Friday, Sept 8

2017--09--09 What to take to a shelter & what to expect - Bradenton Fl Herald

On Friday, Sept. 8th, the forecasters were saying that this part of Georgia could soon expect heavy rain and high winds . . . followed by widespread power outages. So we decided it was time to mosey on a bit further north. Peggy spent more than an hour on the phone trying to book a motel room in Chattanooga. None was available. Nary a single pad. Little did we know, in addition to the untold hundreds of refugees like us, they were hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. So Peggy finally found us a room about 40 miles further up the road at Cleveland, Tennessee.

We took a long way around Atlanta, to keep from fighting that urban traffic. We saw a few scenic spots, traveling the back two-lane and sometimes four-lane roads of rural Georgia. But mostly we saw stoplights and lots of lumber trucks and innumerable strip retail shops and such.

We finally arrived in Cleveland, Tennessee and checked into our motel. It was located right next to paradise, which is to say, next to a Cracker Barrel restaurant. We were a good little boy and girl, though, and avoided our normal “Southern comfort” foods. I’m about six weeks from my next doctor’s appointment and I am determined to exceed his recommendation for me to shed at least 20 pounds (over a 3 month period).

Soon after we had arrived, Peggy discovered that the little meeting we had with a strip of blown truck tire back near Lake City had not just put a dent in our passenger door . . . but it had knocked the peawadden out of the turn sign assembly on the front, passenger side of our car. It was just dangling by a thread. But, using virtually all of my mechanical skills, I found a bungee cord in my tool box. I flawlessly attached one end to a motor mount inside the engine compartment, stretched it down over our grill and expertly attached it to the assembly. Ah, the satisfaction of a job well done. For a while, anyway.

Saturday, Sept. 9th, dawned with a stunningly beautiful day. We left our dog in her large cage in our motel room, and we retraced our steps back to Chattanooga with a list of several things we wanted to see and do. As we approached the downtown area, near the area along the Tennessee River, we noticed how athletic all these Chattanooganites looks. Both men and women were slim and muscled up, with fancy athletic shoes, colorful athletic shorts and shirts, and even with athletic looking bicycles — some with tires no wider than my thumb.

Duh. Then we found out the city was hosting the World Championship “Ironman” and “Ironwomen” contests that weekend. Hundreds of certified athletes and thousands of fans and families crowded the area we had to pass through. There were barricades everywhere so the public could not cross a street during a bycicyle race (not a good idea) or a foot race. We also got to see these way-too-fit folks swimming across the Tennessee River, when they all no doubt had perfectly good swmming pools back at their motels.

Well, here is where the plot thickens. As we were trying to get through this mass of athletic folks, Peggy missed seeing a step down off a curb and hurt her left foot. Not her ankle, the side of her foot. She was in considerable pain, but managed to hobble on down to the river — through three or four of those barriers — to where we bought tickets for the luncheon cruise aboard the Southern Belle Riverboat.

Since her foot was hurting and we were boxed in by the sports activities, we sat at that location for about an hour. Finally, we loaded onto the Riverboat. They had a big and private birthday party going on upstairs, but on the main deck there were probably only about 15 of us. But, off we went. It was a nice little river tour, with a guide giving some history of what we saw.

2017--09--09 05 Chattanooga, TN - World Championship Ironman and Ironwoman contest

2017--09--09 15 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River

2017--09--09 18 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 19 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

2017--09--09 20 Chatanooga, TN - Southern Belle Riverboat Cruise on the Tenn River - by Peg Paregien

About two hours later, we discovered as we prepared to leave that Peggy’s foot was so swollen and sore that she absolutely could not walk. We informed the boat’s staff of what had happened and our predicament. There was no way she could climb the steep hill up to where all the events were going on. Nor could she manuever through the crowds, nor could she get far enough for me to bring our car close enough to pick her up.

After about 45 minutes of waiting for help, one of the uniformed boat staff — perhaps a captain himself — took a personal interest in our dilemma. He finally agreed to procure a golf cart and give both of us a ride to the streets up above. So this man named Daniel, dressed in a sharp uniform which perhaps passed for an official of some kind, weaved the cart through the barricades and up past the crowd. He even drove about three city blocks, on the public streets, to get to a corner parking spot about two blocks from our car. So, showing my own athleticism (I hate that word and other “ism’s” just like it), I sucked in my stomach and sorta jogged a lot of the way — even up hill — to get our car. I drove down and “Captain Daniel” helped Peggy into the car while I waved the impatient drivers around us. Bless you, Daniel, you were wonderful.

So we high-tailed it out of Chattanooga as fast as the numerous areas under construction and the heavy load of traffic would allow. I managed to get Peggy from the car to our motel room, then I skedaddled a couple of miles down the road to a CVS because they had a practical nurse on duty there. Right. Except, . . . that she had gone to supper right before I arrived. So I bought about $70 of home remedies and hurried back to the motel and put some ice on Peggy’s foot. That seemed to help, but all other activities were out.

We we were “forced” to sit in the room and eat the Sonic burgers I had picked up on the way back from CVS, . . . while we watched our University of Oklahoma “Sooners” (ranked Number 7 at the time) gave #2 ranked Ohio State “Buckeyes” a spanking they won’t soon forget.

In between plays and during the commercials, we watched the weather bulletins. And Hurricane Irma was shifting further west, away from Miami and headed directly toward Tampa (and us at Bradenton). Yikes. And to make matters even more interesting, they had warnings of heavy rain and high winds there in Cleveland, Tenn.

2017--09--09 05 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 1 of 2

2017--09--09 06 Hurricane Irma - Bradenton, FL Herald -- Page 2 of 2

So . . . we phoned my cousin/brother Jerry Paregien and his wife Muriel in Kingsport, Tennessee (in the northeast corner near Bristol Speedway) and pleaded on bended knees for them to put up a couple of refugees. Now, the Paregien family — our Paregien grandparents (Frank and Mattie) as well as Jerry’s mom and dad and my own mom and dad — know all about being refugees in a foreign country. They all left poverty-stricken Oklahoma in 1942 and moved to Ventura County, California in hopes of getting work in the war industry. And they did exactly that, and their lives and those of their descendants changed dramatically. They all went to work for the U.S. Navy at Port Hueneme (near Oxnard).

Anyway, Jerry and Muriel graciously agreed to take us in as long as we wanted or needed to stay. So we again loaded up Allie and our stuff, leaving Cleveland about 8:00 am on Sunday morning, Sept. 10th. We passed Knoxville and about the time we were to turn north, off of I-40, we saw a sign saying that Sevierville was just 15 miles on east. So we decided to take a quick tour. We stopped at a really beautiful Visitor’s Center and got a bunch of brochures.

That’s when one of the employees walked over the ladies who were helping me and told them their manager had called and said they would shut down at noon Monday because the National Park Service was shutting down the area parks because of dire predictions of heavy rain, high winds and probably trees falling and power losses.

That sure explained why we had seen a mob of cars and RVs headed out of Sevierville as we were headed into town. Now my momma didn’t raise no dummies, so I changed our plans and got right back on the road to Kingsport.

2017--09--10 08 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

2017--09--10 09 Kingsport, Tenn - sunset - by Stan Paregien

We spent a delightful time with Jerry and Muriel in their hillbilly home. Well, okay, it is beautiful and spacious home on a hill, not a cramped log cabin by any means. We spent Sunday night and Monday night there. On Monday I took our car down to a nearby mechanic and he was able to stabilize the turn signal assembly . . . by putting a second bungee cord on it. Naw, not really. He was able to snap it back together for a temporary fix, as it is cracked and some “teeth” are missing.

However, the weather folks were now forecasting those same heavy rains and high winds for Kingsport about noon on Tuesday. So we packed up, again, and headed further north. Do you see a pattern here??

Well, friends, we’ll continue the story of our evacuation from Florida in our next issue.

Thanks for stopping by.

— Stan Paregien

 

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Issue 361 – The Vietnam War

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The Paregien Journal  –  Issue 361  –  September 17, 2017

The Vietnam War

Tonight, Sept. 17, 2017 our local cable station will air on one of our PBS stations another new film series by master storyteller Ken Burns. Mr. Burns previously did such outstanding documentaries as “The Great Depression” and “The Civil War.” This one is no doubt his most controversial one of any he has done. It is titled “The Vietnam War.”

Vietnam War - Photos - 01 -- SV Police Chief killed Viet Cong suspect in Saigon in 1968

Vietnam War - Photos - 02 -- a SV plane Accidental dropped napalm on people, including 9 yr old Kim Phuc

Vietnam War - Photos - 03 -- American soldier in 1965 with 'War is Hell' on his helmet

Vietnam War - Photos - 04 -- Anti-war in Vietnam march in 1969 drew 400,000 people

Vietnam War - Photos - 05 -- American soldier saving 2 V children from danger

I plan to watch every hour of it, so that means a total investment over the next few weeks of 18 hours. Of course, if you miss it the first time around, it will be playing again in your area sometime in a year or two and periodically until Vietnam, . . . er, I mean . . . Hell freezes over.

There are lessons to be learned about our world, our nation and about ourselves if we will just pay attention. Here is some information about it:

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 1

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 2

New York Times - KEN BURNS' VIETNAM WAR -- Sept 17, 2017 -- Page 3

The Vietnam War by Ken Burns -- intro to 2017 series

 

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